SPECIAL REPORTS CALENDAR

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Special Reports Calendar

Date
Publication
Friday 26 Aug 2022
African Development

African Development

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 26 August 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Overview

Much of the progress that African countries have made in recent decades has been reversed by two external shocks: first the Covid pandemic and then the war in Ukraine, with its potentially worrying consequences for African food security. This piece will look at  what has been gained over years of development, what has been lost and whether African countries can bounce back.


Ticad and Japan’s Impact on Africa

Japan has been organising the Tokyo International Conference on African Development since 1993 and this year the eighth edition of the summit will take place in Tunisia. But what has Ticad actually achieved and is Japan punching above or below its weight on the continent? Japan’s own development trajectory and its continued technological prowess - in fields as diverse as energy and agriculture - means it has much to offer. It also has much to gain in terms of hard commodities and soft power. But can it compete with China and become truly part of the African development story,  helping to unlock the riddle of how a country - and a continent - takes off economically? 


Tunisia

Tunisia has made progress in terms of economic development, but this has not spared it from years of political turmoil. This piece will look at development successes and failures in the host country. 


Energy Transition

As the UN COP27 climate conference approaches, many African countries are pushing back against the idea that they must give up fossil fuels. Still, others see potential in embracing new technologies from geothermal and hydrogen to electric vehicles and circular-economy solutions. Can these diverse views be reconciled? 


Food Security

The war in Ukraine, coupled with growing food security in several parts of the continent from Madagascar to the Sahel, has focused attention on agricultural production and food security. Despite years of effort, many countries have struggled to formulate policies that help their nation’s farmers, raise crop yields, improve soil quality and provide cheap food for growing urban populations. Yet without this combination of factors, meaningful development will be difficult. This piece will look at what is at stake and how it might be tackled. 


Manufacturing

Most African countries’ route to development has gone via manufacturing and exports. A few countries on the continent. including Morocco, Ethiopia, Rwanda and Ghana, have sought to emulate this path, with mixed results. In much of Africa, manufacturing has gone backwards as local producers have been overwhelmed by cheap imports from China and elsewhere. Can this trend be reversed and, if so, where is it happening?


A Tale of Health in Two Countries

This piece will compare and contrast the story of two countries in west Africa with similar levels of per capita income but with very different outcomes in terms of health and social welfare. What makes for good and bad health policy and can policymakers in Africa learn best practice? 


Vaccines

The Covid pandemic taught many countries in Africa that, when the world goes into crisis, they will be at the back of the queue. African leaders have responded by arguing that economies need to become more resilient and self-sufficient. Nowhere is this truer than in vaccines, where the African Centres for Disease Control and Prevention has set the target of massively ramping up local production from just 1 per cent of the vaccines consumed to 60 per cent by 2040. Can this possibly be achieved and what would be some of the knock-on benefits? 


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Larry Kenney: Mob:+44 (0) 7775 921 048, larry.kenney@ft.com

Sunny Sun +81 903207 7568, sunny.sun@ft.com

Kona Masui +81(0) 80 4069 4661, kona.masui@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


Saturday 27 Aug 2022
Art of Fashion AW22
Thursday 01 Sep 2022
Call for Entries - FT 1000: Europes Fastest-Growing Companies
Thursday 01 Sep 2022
Call for Entries - FT The Americas Fastest-Growing Companies
Friday 02 Sep 2022
Watches & Jewellery: September

Watches & Jewellery: September

The Financial Times proposes to publish this Special Report on 02 September 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Service Watches

Several brands offer special loan watches to clients while their own watch is being serviced. Some of those have proven more popular than the ones given for repair, resulting in the creation of new models. How do these service watches fare in the secondary market?


K-pop Marketing

Originally a niche music movement in Asia, K-Pop keeps growing in popularity in the West, drawing new crowds for jewellers who use their singers to promote their events and wares. Traditional high jewellery clients may not know K-pop stars, but these help sell all the entry-price level pieces which are the bread and butter of jewellery houses.


Subdial

The self-described Deliveroo of watches, is a fast-growing platform for watch trading aimed at collectors wanting liquidity. With Brexit stifling trade with the EU, Subdial has become a go-to for UK collectors wanting to trade. How do their turnover numbers add up?


Singer Re-imagined

The high-end watch brand grew out of Singer Vehicle Design, a US-based firm that builds Porsches based on 1990s 911s but brought up to and beyond modern specification. Ex-rock musician Rob Dickinson, teamed-up with Italian watch designer Marco Borraccino to create Singer Re-imagined which specialises in chronographs with a very unusual, specially developed movement/display.  


Gold Prices

With the price of raw materials on the rise, luxury houses are repricing their products and reassessing their short-term outlook.


Basel Fall-out

Baselworld’s closure left a vacuum in the traditional Swiss jewellery trade shows. Which are the latest alternatives and how can they gauge their success?


Not Set in Stone

How has the globe-trotting gem buyer of the pre-Covid days had to adapt to a new world reality and some of the ingenious new ways of sourcing precious minerals are proving to be worth keeping.






Luxury Clocks

Several watchmakers have a separate but lesser known production of table clocks. How does it compare to the regular watchmaking process and how profitable can it be?


Plus: news in brief from the watch and jewellery industry


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Yoon Sun Oh +33 (0) 6 6683 3154, yoonsun.oh@ft.com

Ade Malino +33 (0) 7 8283 7824, ade.malino@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

Friday 02 Sep 2022
FT Wealth 2022 - September

FT Wealth September

The Financial Times proposes to publish this online FT Report on 2 September2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Editor's Letter: Wealth in Charts

An overview of a topic of importance to high earners or wealthy individuals, setting out the relevant data in a series of annotated charts and graphics.


A New Dawn for US Fossil Fuel Billionaires

Dario Kenner, the author of Carbon Inequality: The Role of the Richest in Climate Change, coined the term "polluter elite" to describe the wealthiest in society who invest extensively in fossil fuels. But earlier this year, Reliance Industries — the company led by Mukesh Ambani, Asia’s richest man, announced plans to invest $76bn in clean energy projects. This was an increase on an earlier commitment of $10bn by the world’s biggest fossil-fuel billionaire. Is this the start of an attempted new beginning for the fossil fuel elite? 


Green Investing in a Time of an Energy Crisis

Soaring energy prices, the war in Ukraine and further evidence from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change on the severity of the environmental threat are all pushing sustainable investors “into a new phase”, according to the London School of Economics.   

The Ukraine conflict has moved strategies such as divestment centre-stage as corporations and investors race to exit Russian assets. However, investors also want to allocate capital to net-zero projects, especially in the Global South. And there is growing investor demand for green, social and sustainability sovereign bonds. Are their wealth managers adapting to this “new phase” and enabling these decisions?  


Superyachts Go Green

While the Ukraine crisis has focused attention on yachts as a means for Russian oligarchs to escape political scrutiny, environmental campaigners have long suggested greater environmental scrutiny is needed, too. According to a report in The Guardian, a superyacht with permanent crew, helicopter pad, submarines and pools emits about 7,020 tonnes of carbon dioxide a year — 1,500 times more than a typical family car. And yet sailing yachts used to be the ultimate in green transport. Can new technologies restore the vessels’ ESG credentials?  


Hong Kong v Singapore in Wealth Management

Pre-Covid Hong Kong was comfortably ahead of Singapore for wealth management business — as measured by assets under management. Hong Kong had $1.9tn of cross-border wealth versus the city state’s $1.1tn. Together, they were even larger than Switzerland, which has $2.4tn. But how has that changed in the wake of the pandemic and the political crackdown in Hong Kong?


Female Entrepreneurs in the Gulf 

An 2022 analysis by Arab News has found that women in countries that are part of the Gulf Cooperation Council are increasingly pursuing their own business interests, and they feel more empowered by some reforms undertaken in the region. In the UAE, for example, Gender Lens Investing, to promote equality, is helping female entrepreneurs to get backing for new ventures. As a result, last year, 11 percent of venture capital funding in the UAE went to female-only founders, compared to the international average of 3 percent. But academic research by Dr Sumaya Hashim also finds that women are still expected to adhere to traditional gender roles within the private sphere of the family. Can entrepreneurs break free of these constraints? 


Madison Darbyshire Column

In the Hamptons, the playground of US millionaires, a big fight has been playing out: “Helicopters versus Homeowners”, as the New York Times put it. Those homeowners, angered by the noise that disturbs their weekends away from the city, have managed to secure the closure of East Hampton Airport, and its reopening as a private facility subject to limitations on use. But frequent fliers and business owners have filed lawsuits to keep it open. Watch this (air)space…


Rich Column

Rhymer Rigby opines on a question of the moment for dynasties, philanthropists, or wealthy investors.     


PLUS   Book Review


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Petra Harkay +44 (0) 20 7775 6815, petra.harkay@ft.com


Katharine Christian +44 (0)7557 943 514, katharine.christian@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on edito



Monday 12 Sep 2022
Business Education 2022 (5) - Masters in Management

Business Education: 

Masters in Management

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 12 September 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Introduction

An analysis of the leading business schools for Masters in Management programmes and trends in the sector.


Education Editor’s Letter 

Looking at developments in business education and our coverage. 


The Rankings

The 2022 rankings of the best providers of Masters in Management programmes.


Management Column

Andrew Hill, the FT’s management editor, explores current thinking around leadership. 


Professor’s Column

A business school professor shares thoughts and research on challenges facing business today. 


MiMs & GEN Z 

Masters in Management are often studied by younger students, straight from a first degree. How are curricula being tailored to the demands of a generation that places high value on ethics, social responsibility, the environment and inclusivity, and who often have ambitions to start a business?


Applications Advice

What is the role of the GMAT, how should students prepare and what are the key tips to strengthen their chances of being admitted to MiM courses?


Careers

The rising risk of a global recession underscores the importance of choosing a course that will boost employment prospects. How do MiM courses equip students with the skills, tools and networks to succeed, and how do employers view graduates?


The MiM in Charts

Drawing on FT data, business education ranking specialists look at the Masters in Management and those who study it.


Digital Skills

Employer demand for digital skills has led to a rise in the number of students choosing a technology-related business masters degree. Schools have responded with new programmes focused on topics including blockchain and digital assets, analytics and artificial intelligence.


Interview

An in-depth interview with a graduate about their studies and what the masters has meant for their career.


Student Views  

Students and graduates share their experiences of study and what came next.


Technology

An FT tech specialist explores developments that will affect business and our working lives. 


In Real Life  

A graduate explains what it was like to take a Masters in Management course and how it has affected their career, in their own words

.  

Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Rachel Blake +44 (0)20 7873 3290, rachel.spence@ft.com

Jackie King +1 917 551 5113, jackie.king@ft.com

Matthew Rodford +44 79212 50719, matthew.rodford@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Monday 12 Sep 2022
Health at Work 2022: Burst 6 (Single Sponsor)
Monday 19 Sep 2022
FTfm Special: Responsible Investing 2

FTfm: Responsible Investing 2

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 19 September 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

 

A Moment of Reckoning: What is ESG For?

In the past few years, "ESG" — environmental, social and governance — has become the hottest acronym in finance. Trillions of dollars have flowed into funds branded along these lines. But now the agenda faces a backlash from multiple angles.US conservatives call it a stalking horse for leftist interests that are undermining the national economy. Others worry that the concept has been exploited cynically by financial companies with little interest in genuine impact, and that the hype around ESG investing is a distraction from the need for tighter regulation. Some even worry that the rise of ESG, with its focus on governance risks, could be squeezing capital flows to developing countries. Is it time to replace ESG with something better? And if so, what?

 

Transition Funding

In June, Brookfield Asset Management announced it had raised the biggest "impact investment" fund to date, with a first close of $15bn. The fund, to be overseen by former Bank of England governor Mark Carney, will be focused on "transition funding" – that is, investing in heavily polluting companies with the aim of making them cleaner. This is an increasingly fashionable approach: funds with similar goals have been raised by others including KKR and Blackstone. But how will these investors ensure that their money drives serious change at these companies, rather than prolonging business as usual?

 

Executive Pay

While many households contend with a cost of living crisis, the personal finances of major corporate heads have never looked healthier. In the US, CEO pay has surged since the pandemic, with big corporate bosses now earning well over 200 times the income of their median employee. Other countries such as the UK may have less extreme ratios, but have still seen a pronounced widening of that pay gap. At shareholder meetings this year, some investors have begun to push back strongly against high executive pay. Is this becoming a key battlefield in the responsible investment space?

 

Carbon Markets

As companies chase ambitious net zero targets, many of them are planning to rely heavily on carbon offset credits. That's been driving rapid growth in this space, which is set to become a huge market worth tens or even hundreds of billions of dollars. Amid serious concerns about the true impact of many offset projects, initiatives are underway to develop serious standards for them. That comes as some experts warn that what is really needed is a focus on removing carbon from the atmosphere, rather than avoiding emissions, which is the goal of nearly all offset projects today. What is the future of this market – and what would truly responsible investment in carbon offsets look like?

 

Sustainability Claims and Legal Risk

Last year Desiree Fixler, the former sustainability head of German asset manager DWS, went public with claims that it had been exaggerating its claims about using ESG factors in its investment decisions. Her intervention led to major investigations in both the US and Germany, and ultimately the departure of DWS's CEO after a police raid. Meanwhile US regulators have taken action against both Goldman Sachs and BNY Mellon over their marketing of ESG-branded funds. And Norway's consumer watchdog has threatened legal action against clothing companies that overstate their sustainability credentials. This article dives into the growing legal risks surrounding ESG claims by investment companies, and by the companies they invest in.

 

Supply Chains

For many investors, it no longer seems enough to know that the companies in their portfolio are minimising social and environmental harms in their direct operations. Increasingly, attention is turning to supply chains, with investors seeking information about the carbon footprints, biodiversity impacts and working conditions of suppliers that can run into the hundreds or more for a single company. This article looks at the huge challenges of finding such information, and how investors are approaching this task – and also at the growing army of data providers who are seeking to help them do so.


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Chris Holt,  +44 (0)7415136450, chris.holt@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

Monday 19 Sep 2022
Next Tech Growth Markets

Next Tech Growth Markets

The Financial Times proposes to publish this Special Report on 19 September 2022


We plan to include the following pieces of content (please note: this list is provisional):


Introduction

Overview of this year’s report, especially the huge momentum that Asia is building up – in part a function of demographics.


Vietnam

The country is predicted to be the top tech growth market in 2022. We look at why this is the case, with factors including ambitious government policies – notably for 100 per cent smartphone penetration by 2023 – and significant FDI in manufacturing, which will boost 5G enterprise data usage.


5G – Is it a Goer? 

Some countries, notably India and Mexico, are betting heavily on 5G services. But are consumers willing to stump up for the extra functionality – especially as inflation bites? Are we seeing diminishing returns as the G-numbers climb? And, in terms of policy, doesn’t fibre do most of the heavy lifting anyway?


Play as you Go 

Cloud gaming is projected to explode – from a $1bn market in 2020, Omdia thinks it will be worth $12bn by 2024. What are games makers doing to capitalise on this, and is China positioned to make significant inroads on the US’s leadership in this area? And will gamers allow advertising to make the market even more valuable?


Mobile Payments

Traditional debit cards are coming under pressure from both real-time account-to-account payments and BNPL upstarts. What’s driving the uptake of these alternatives, which is likely to have the highest growth, and will debit cards be squeezed out?


Online Advertising

This year online video advertising revenue is projected to overtake traditional linear TV revenue. This is playing into the hands of big tech – GAMA – because, paradoxically, efforts to protect privacy, such as GDPR and Apple’s App Tracking Transparency protocol, mean that it’s only these incumbents who will be able to gather enough data to make advertising pay. What is the likelihood that other global media companies will be able to challenge their dominance?




Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Nick Eyles on +44 (0)20 7873 3613, nick.eyles@ft.com


Shobnom Dasgupta on +44 (0)20 7873 4114, shobnom.dasgupta@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Tuesday 20 Sep 2022
Energy Transition

Energy Transition

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 20 September 2022

 

What the Gas Crisis Means for the Roll Out of Renewable Energy in the EU

The EU has said it will accentuate its efforts to diversify away from Russian oil and gas, giving a boost to projects from wind, to solar, to nuclear. How realistic are the EU's aims? Possible column with a professor at Cologne university or a piece interviewing him.

 

Can Europe Establish Effective Supply Chains for its Renewable Plans?

The continent wants to ensure that the investment benefits stay in Europe as much as possible, rather than outsource manufacturing and materials supply to other countries. It faces challenges given China's dominance in solar panel manufacturing and rare earth materials critical to wind turbine and battery manufacturing.

 

A Just Transition 

What governments are doing around the world to support oil and gas workers in reskilling for green energyOil and gas workers fear being left behind but the challenge of retraining programmes is one of timing and government willingness       to fund.

 

Stranded Assets

Does the energy crisis risk embedding gas long-term in future energy plans, as countries rush to find alternatives to Russian supplies? 

From the US to Europe will we see too many LNG terminals or new gas fields developed at a time when the overall plan is to get off gas? The tension between short term needs and long term aims goes to the heart of the energy transition. 

 

The Race for Green Hydrogen 

A look at the companies making electrolysers and the scale of government support they need.  Green hydrogen has arguably been boosted by the surge in gas prices, giving it an advantage over rival blue hydrogen, which relies on natural gas. But can this small number of companies making electrolysers scale up quickly enough and what government support are they asking for?

 

EV Charging Infrastructure 

What needs to be done over the next decade to make mass adoption of EVs feasible.  Possible interview with one of the energy majors like Shell or BP that are investing a lot in this area of activity. 

 

Carbon Capture and Storage 

Long tipped to be the next big thing, has its moment finally come?

Look at the roll out of projects in the UK, with a number recently receiving government backing 

Security of Supply 

Has Russia's weaponisation of gas put security of supply back at the top of the agenda?

How are renewable energy companies leveraging this to convince governments that investing in wind, solar, hydrogen and nuclear can give countries a domestic source of energy supplies that is less exposed to geopolitics?

 

Are we Due for a Nuclear Renaissance?

Many countries are turning back towards nuclear energy as a result of the gas crisis. What are the challenges, given that there have been almost two decades when nuclear has been out of favour?



Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Rebecca Nolimaio on +44 (0)7935 202240, rebecca.nolimaio@ft.com


Maria Gonzalez +34 91 564 1810, Fax +34 91 564 1255, maria.gonzalez@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


Wednesday 21 Sep 2022
Innovative Lawyers: FT Business Legal Leaders - Burst 1
Monday 26 Sep 2022
Business Education: Asia-Pacific Business Schools

Asia Pacific Business Education

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in 26 September 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Changing Demand

Demand is increasing for business education among Asian students while the supply of high quality schools in the region is expanding. The pandemic, as well as political and economic disruptions, new practices and intensifying competition are modifying the formats, destinations and courses taken by students in countries as varied as China and Australia 


Directory of Providers

The FT shares tables containing key data around the leading business schools in the region, including those which are accredited and ranked in its listings of MBAs, EMBAs, Masters in Management and Finance programmes and for executive education


Asian Customisation

Business schools are increasingly developing their own case studies, teaching

resources and curricula tailored to reflect the particular experiences of businesses,

corporate culture and values. Examples of innovations and best practices.


Professor Op-ed

Insights from a leading academic based in Asia on cutting-edge research and trends

of use to business and management


Symbiosis with the West

High costs, less certain job prospects and ambivalence towards immigration reflected

in visa regimes have shaken up the traditional lure of North American and European

institutions, while a growing number of Asian business schools are expanding their offerings in other parts of the world.


Emerging Asia

An exploration of the nature of fresh demand for business education and local and

regional providers from fast-growing countries such as Indonesia, Vietnam and the

Philippines


Case Studies

A detailed look at practices in institutions in locations such as Singapore, China, India, Japan and Australia.



Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Jackie King +1 917 551 5113, jackie.king@ft.com


Matt Rodford +44 79212 50719, matthew.rodford@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Tuesday 27 Sep 2022
Health at Work 2022: Burst 7 (Single Sponsor)
Wednesday 28 Sep 2022
Innovative Lawyers: FT Business Legal Leaders - Burst 2
Thursday 29 Sep 2022
Innovative Lawyers: Accelerating Business - Burst 4
Saturday 01 Oct 2022
Collecting: Design Art
Monday 03 Oct 2022
FTfm Special: ETFs 3
Wednesday 05 Oct 2022
Call for Entries - FT Africa s Fastest Growing Companies
Wednesday 05 Oct 2022
Innovative Lawyers: FT Business Legal Leaders - Burst 3
Thursday 06 Oct 2022
Investing in America

Investing in America

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 06 October 2022


Overview

For the first time, the FT and Nikkei are jointly publishing an index on the best cities in America for foreign companies. How did we get here? What did we learn? And is the US losing its edge as the best place in the world for foreign direct investment? 


The Winner

Profile of the winning city, including the how and why of how they became a magnet for foreign investment. 


The Surprise: Atlanta

Georgia’s capital doesn’t seem like a place that would be on a list of cities that have become magnets for foreign companies. But this year it won the contest for a $5.5bn Hyundai EV plant, and several other major overseas multinationals are picking Georgia as their US home. How did Atlanta do it? 


The Ranking

Large infographic with the ranking of the FT-Nikkei Investing in America cities. 

SIDEBAR on methodology


National Security: The New Barrier to Entry

Over the last five years, concern about Chinese investment in the US has led policymakers to empower CFIUS, the Treasury Department-led federal agency that vets foreign investment in the US. But companies from allied countries – including Japan, Britain and the Netherlands, three of the largest sources of FDI – are getting caught in the net. Has the US over-corrected? 


Foreign Investment in the Age of Dobbs

Political polarisation has become an increasingly difficult issue for domestic American companies to navigate even before Roe v Wade was overturned. It’s even harder for foreign companies – especially after Dobbs v Jackson. Are they avoiding states with harsh new abortion restructions?


Foreign Banks in America: Retreat or Retrenchment? 

It was one of the biggest financial trends of the 1990s: Big foreign banks acquiring US assets to compete directly in the American market. Credit Suisse bought First Boston. Deutsche Bank bought Bankers Trust. But since the 2007 financial crisis, foreign banks have been on the retreat, selling off US assets and giving ground to big domestic rivals. Can foreigners make a comeback, or is the age of the foreign bank disappearing on Wall Street? 


What’s Wrong with Silicon Valley? 

As cities around America tout themselves as the “next” tech hub, the original is going through an identity crisis. In 2021, San Francisco received the lowest amount of FDI in over 10 years. The US Census said it was the city with the fastest declining population in the pandemic. The mayor's office estimates that one-third of the workforce is remote and living outside the city, hurting tax revenue. Can the City by the Bay get its groove back? 


Foxconn in Wisconsin: A Case Study of what can go Wrong

It was one of the most highly-touted foreign investments of the Trump era: Foxconn, one of Apple’s biggest foreign suppliers, was going to make a $10bn investment in a small town outside of Milwaukee, after the city and state promised $3bn in subsidies. But the project never materialised, and politicians involved were voted out of office. We talk to those involved to see what went wrong. 


Toyota in Texas: Case Study of what can go Right

Five years ago, Toyota moved its North America headquarters from Southern California, where it had been for half a century, to a suburb of Dallas, Texas. How does it look five years later, especially in the wake of controversies around social policies in Texas. 


Japan Inc: Why Japan has Remained the Biggest Investor in the US. 

Even as Asia’s economy has boomed, corporate Japan has retained the title of the largest foreign investor in the US. Why does it continue to bet on the American market – and could those investment dollars be at risk? 


China in Hollywood: The Giant Sucking Sound. 

Chinese foreign investment in the US peaked in 2019 after a spree of high-profile deals in the entertainment industry, including AMC theatres, Legend Entertainment and Universal Music. An increasingly hostile political environment in the US and crackdowns back home have led to a sharp falloff. Is China done in Hollywood?


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Don Janocha M +1 917 513 5925, don.janocha@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Friday 07 Oct 2022
Watches & Jewellery: Asia Special
Saturday 08 Oct 2022
Collecting: Frieze Week
Monday 10 Oct 2022
Managing Climate Change - Burst 1
Wednesday 12 Oct 2022
Innovative Lawyers: FT Business Legal Leaders - Burst 4
Wednesday 12 Oct 2022
Women in Business 2
Friday 14 Oct 2022
Innovative Lawyers: Europe
Saturday 15 Oct 2022
Collecting: Paris Art Scene
Monday 17 Oct 2022
Business Education 2022 (6) - Executive MBA

FT Business Education:

Executive MBA Ranking 

The Financial Times plans to publish this magazine on October 17th 2022.


Advertising booking deadline: September 12th 2022

Advertising copy deadline: September 19th 2022


We are likely to include the following articles (please note that this list is provisional):


Introduction

An analysis of the leading business schools for EMBA programmes and trends in the sector.


Education Editor’s Letter

Looking at developments in business education and our coverage. 


The Rankings: The 2022 rankings of the best providers of EMBA programmes.


Management Column

Andrew Hill, the FT’s management editor, explores current thinking around leadership. 


Professor’s Column

A business school professor shares thoughts and research on challenges facing business today. 


GEOPOLITICS is becoming a key strategic priority for business leaders, given rising global tensions and conflict. It is also a growing priority for business schools, which are sharpening their focus on the topic in their teaching.

 

Diversity and Inclusion

What can be done to increase the diversity of EMBA students and teaching faculty, including the share of women, who remain a minority at most institutions? 

 

The EMBA in Charts: FT experts delve into the data from the 2022 ranking.

 

Funding

The difficult financial outlook will have sharpened minds on the costs of an EMBA. With a recession looming, will employers cut back on funding for these expensive degrees? Or could funding help to attract and retain talent in a tight labour market? 

 

Interview

An in-depth interview with a graduate about their studies and what the degree has meant for their career.

Resilience

Executive MBA participants often juggle the demanding degree alongside senior jobs and family commitments. How can students best manage the pressure? 


Student Views

Students and graduates share their experiences of study and what came next.


Technology

An FT tech specialist explores developments that will affect business and our working lives. 


In Real Life

A graduate explains what it was like to take an EMBA and how it has affected their career, in their own words.  

Editorial information:

Special Reports are written by FT staff journalists and a small number of selected freelance writers. They will be specialists in the field and already have regular contacts to update them. It is therefore difficult for an unsolicited submission to be so compelling that it forces its way on to a writer’s agenda. However, it does happen occasionally. We ask that all submissions be sent to ftreports@ft.com, from where they are forwarded to the appropriate writer.

Please also note that due to the volume of material received, it is not always possible to acknowledge or reply to every submission.

■ Recently published Surveys and FT Reports, as well as a list of forthcoming FT Reports and their synopses can be downloaded by going to www.ft.com/special-reports and clicking on the link to the Reports library.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

■ Back issues of printed Survey and FT Reports can be obtained from: Historic Newspapers, Signature Online Limited, No 1 waterside Station Road, Harpenden, Herts, AL5 4US; Tel. no: 0870 165 1470; Fax no: 01582 469 248; or email: info@back-issue-newspapers.co.uk

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Supplements and Special Reports.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


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Jackie King +1 917 551 5113, jackie.king@ft.com

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or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Thursday 20 Oct 2022
Sustainable Food and Agriculture (Single Sponsor)
Monday 24 Oct 2022
FTfm Special: Fixed Income 2
Monday 24 Oct 2022
FT Health: Communicable Diseases
Thursday 27 Oct 2022
Innovative Lawyers: Accelerating Business - Burst 5
Thursday 27 Oct 2022
Investing in Italy

Investing in Italy 

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 27 October 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Italy’s Economic Re-boot

For years before Covid-19 hit, Italy’s economy had underperformed, growing far less than the European average. But Italy now has a once-in-a-generation opportunity to reboot its economy, and raise its long-term growth trajectory, as the largest single recipient of the EU’s 750bn Covid recovery fund. With nearly Euro200bn in grants and concessional loans, prime minister Mario Draghi’s cross-party, national unity government is planning major investments in much-needed physical and social infrastructure — and pushing through significant policy reforms — to make Italy more attractive for investment and reinvigorate growth. With general elections looming next year, however, it's a race against the clock to achieve the EU programs ambitious goals. The drive has been complicated by the war in Ukraine and its impact on the cost of living.

 

Catching up on Renewable Energy

Italy has had one of the lowest renewables energy use in the EU, with just 20 percent of its total energy coming from renewable sources at the start of 2022. This relatively lackadaisical renewable rollout has been blamed on everything from red tape to local resistance. But the Ukraine invasion – and Rome’s desire to wean off Russian gas – has given new impetus to the renewable energy drive. The government has cut red tape to make it easier for projects to proceed, creating many new investment opportunities in the sector.

 

Luring Professional Talent

Despite its many charms, Italy has never been a magnet for foreign professional talent. But Rome is now offering generous tax incentives to lure foreign professionals - and Italians currently resident abroad - to relocate to Italy to inject new dynamism into the economy. New foreign residents - and Italians returning after years abroad - will only pay income tax on a fraction of their earnings, an offer that has begun to lure a new breed of knowledge workers to the country.


Levelling up the South

Italy’s southern region has long lagged economically and socially behind the more prosperous, industrialised north. But a major part of the EU-funded program aims to strengthen the south to reduce these regional inequities, and make it a better place to live and work. Nearly 40 percent of the total plan funds are supposed to be for the south, with plans to build 680 kilometres of new railways lines, and tackle problems in nearly 15,000 square kilometres of ‘market failure areas.’

 

Tech Italia

Italy is best known for craftsmanship, luxury and heavy industrial manufacturing. But the country is now seeing the emergence of an increasingly dynamic tech and tech and start-up ecosystem, which is being boosted by an official digitisation drive and venture capital investments from state-owned Cassa Depositi e Prestiti. Among the successful start-ups are a wave of new fintech companies that are competing with Italy’s banks.

 

Interview: Minister for Digital Transformation (TBC)

The former head of Vodafone is now the minister for digital transformation in Mario Draghi’s government. He takes stock of the government’s progress. 

Other candidate:

Enrico Resmini, CEO and executive director of CDP Venture Capital, overseeing the venture capital investments in the start-up ecosystem

 

Italian Luxury

Italian luxury brands are respected globally for the quality of their products. But unlike French luxury brands – which have heavily corporatized under large conglomerates, Italian luxury houses remain largely family owned, and many iconic brands are now reflecting on their future. While Renzo Rosso's OTB group has snapped up Jil Sander and Marni from the French as it prepares to go public in 2024, others are starting to contemplate a sale of assets – or worried about becoming take-over targets. What's next for one of the two greatest fashion industries in the world?

 

Greening Milan

Italy’s financial and business capital Milan is on a drive to transform itself into a smart, green city. Under Mayor Giuseppe Sala, the city council has focused on transformation of its mobility and transportation service and pushing for greater use of technology and sustainable energy solutions. The revamp of several of its districts has attracted world class architects and large capital investments from abroad, including the Qatari sovereign wealth fund. Covid briefly brought progress to a halt. But ahead of the 2026 Winter Olympics - hosted by Milan and the nearby mountain resort of Cortina, the city council is pressing on with new green-oriented and technology-driven investments. 

 

Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Giulia Pepe +44 (0)20 7873 3225, giulia.pepe@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

Friday 28 Oct 2022
FT Wealth 2022 - Family Office

FT Wealth October

The Financial Times proposes to publish this online FT Report on 28 October 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Editor's Letter: Wealth in Charts

An overview of a topic of importance to high earners or wealthy individuals, setting out the relevant data in a series of annotated charts and graphics.


Luxury Property

A look at the top end of the market in the light of inflation and rising interest rates. Has real estate lost any allure for the rich. What advice are real estate specialists and family offices giving to their wealthy clients? 


Portfolio Rebalancing

Do billionaires need to rebalance their investment portfolios when economic times get tough? What will rising inflation and interest rates mean for the rich? What are family offices and wealth managers doing with their asset allocations and fund selections in response to the forecasts for 2023 and beyond?


Wealth Health

A look inside an exclusive clinic for ultra-rich patients struggling to cope with the physical and mental effects on wealth. We find that riches are often at the heart of their problems


Asian Art Boom

Asian buyers and collectors are helping to drive an art sales boom. Art lovers from  the the region are now  taking an ever-bigger share of the world market, 


Giving Back - Back Home 

Three British entrepreneurs are putting money back into the poor town from which they came, raising questions about social policy, the UK government's so-called “levelling up” agenda for disadvantaged regions, and the role of charities in local communities.


Wealth Management after Covid 

Do firms need to re-market wealth management after the pandemic? How have potential client attitudes changed? Are more seeking family office solutions?  What are the services now most highly valued?  

Madison Darbyshire Column

Rich people and empathy - does wealth change the personal and emotional responses to others? 


Rich Column

Rhymer Rigby opines on a question of the moment for dynasties, philanthropists, or wealthy investors.     


PLUS:  Book review


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Petra Harkay +44 (0) 20 7775 6815, petra.harkay@ft.com


Katharine Christian +44 (0)7557 943 514, katharine.christian@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


Tuesday 01 Nov 2022
Tech Champions: Microsite Launch (Single Sponsor)
Friday 04 Nov 2022
Watches & Jewellery: November
Monday 07 Nov 2022
Navigating Cyber Risk - Part 3
Monday 07 Nov 2022
Health at Work 2022: Burst 8 -Tabloid (Single Sponsor)
Tuesday 08 Nov 2022
Tech Champions: Magazine (Single Sponsor)
Tuesday 08 Nov 2022
Managing Climate Change - Burst 2
Wednesday 09 Nov 2022
Innovative Lawyers: Accelerating Business - Burst 6
Friday 18 Nov 2022
Scoreboard: The Business of Formula One

FT Scoreboard:

The Business of F1

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 18 November 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

 

Crypto, Big Tech, Oil: The New Generation of F1 Sponsors

A resurgence in the sport’s popularity is bringing new sponsors to F1. The next generation of sponsors ranges from Saudi Arabia’s state oil company to crypto and big tech companies such as Google and Oracle. The goal? Appealing to new and younger audiences as F1 expands. So how is the sport delivering for sponsors?

 

Behind the Helmet: Drivers Take Centre Stage

Under Liberty Media, F1 is putting drivers at the centre of attention, giving them social media freedoms that weren’t allowed under former supremo Bernie Ecclestone, and, making them protagonists in Netflix’s Drive to Survive. The race is on to build F1’s next stars.

 

Esports and NFTs/ Crypto: F1 Searches for New Audiences 

Crypto sponsors are rushing to enter the sport partnering with the series and teams. The sport is also embracing digital collectibles known as non-fungible tokens, powered by blockchain technology. Meanwhile, F1 is embracing esports and gaming, building on momentum generated during lockdowns when racing was suspended. However, there have been stumbles along the way, with Animoca Brands closing down F1 Delta Time, an official NFT game, earlier this year.

 

Rivals Gun for Mercedes in New Era of F1

Having won its eighth constructors’ championship, a new record in F1, Mercedes has also  dominated in the so-called hybrid era engine. The 2022 season is the first under F1’s all-new car in a new era for racing. Why have the big three made it to the front again despite F1’s efforts to make grands prix less predictable?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising opportunities please contact:


Nikola Peros +33 (6) 2805 8404, nikola.peros@ft.com


Robert Grange +44 (0)7887 656098, robert.grange@ft.com


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Friday 18 Nov 2022
Diversity Leaders
Saturday 26 Nov 2022
Collecting: Art in The Americas
Wednesday 30 Nov 2022
The Future of Energy
Friday 02 Dec 2022
FT Wealth 2022 - December
Saturday 03 Dec 2022
Style: Christmas Gift Guide 2022
Monday 05 Dec 2022
Business Education 2022 (7) - European Business School
Tuesday 06 Dec 2022
Innovative Lawyers: North America
Wednesday 18 Jan 2023
Health at Work 2022: Burst 9 (Single Sponsor)
Wednesday 18 Jan 2023
The World
Monday 13 Feb 2023
Business Education 2023 (1) - Global MBA Rankings
Friday 17 Feb 2023
UK s Leading Management Consultants
Wednesday 01 Mar 2023
Early List Publication - FT 1000: Europes Fastest-Growing Companies
Monday 13 Mar 2023
Business Education 2023 (2) - Online Learning
Wednesday 15 Mar 2023
Early List Publication - FT Asia-Pacific High Growth Companies
Tuesday 21 Mar 2023
FT 1000: Europes Fastest-Growing Companies
Tuesday 28 Mar 2023
Early List Publication - FT The Americas Fastest-Growing Companies
Tuesday 28 Mar 2023
Health at Work 2023: Burst 1 - Microsite Launch (Single Sponsor)
Thursday 06 Apr 2023
FT Asia-Pacific High Growth Companies
Monday 10 Apr 2023
Health at Work 2023: Burst 2 (Single Sponsor)
Friday 28 Apr 2023
FT The Americas Fastest-Growing Companies
Tuesday 02 May 2023
Early List Publication - FT Africa s Fastest Growing Companies
Monday 15 May 2023
Health at Work 2023: Burst 3 (Single Sponsor)
Monday 22 May 2023
Business Education 2023 (3) - Executive Education
Thursday 25 May 2023
FT Africa s Fastest Growing Companies
Monday 12 Jun 2023
Business Education 2023 (4) - Financial Training
Wednesday 21 Jun 2023
Health at Work 2023: Burst 4 (Single Sponsor)
Monday 10 Jul 2023
Health at Work 2023: Burst 5 (Single Sponsor)
Monday 11 Sep 2023
Health at Work 2023: Burst 6 (Single Sponsor)
Monday 11 Sep 2023
Business Education 2023 (5) - Masters in Management
Tuesday 26 Sep 2023
Health at Work 2023: Burst 7 (Single Sponsor)
Monday 16 Oct 2023
Business Education 2023 (6) - Executive MBA
Monday 06 Nov 2023
Health at Work 2023: Burst 8 -Tabloid (Single Sponsor)
Monday 04 Dec 2023
Business Education 2023 (7) - European Business School
Wednesday 17 Jan 2024
Health at Work 2023: Burst 9 (Single Sponsor)

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