SPECIAL REPORTS CALENDAR

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Special Reports Calendar

Date
Publication
Monday 09 May 2022
Health at Work 2022: Burst 2 (Single Sponsor)
Monday 09 May 2022
Exchanges, Trading & Clearing - Burst 1

Exchanges, Trading & Clearing

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in 3 online bursts, on:

9 May; 23 May; and 8 June 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


9 MAY

Russia’s Stock Exchange - Double Dealing?

In late March, as the war in Ukraine continued, BNY Mellon launched a scheme to allow its clients to swap overseas shares in Russia’s biggest companies for locally-listed equivalents. It followed reports that Russia was considering  having depositary receipts in its major companies delisted from foreign exchanges and converted to securities that would trade in Moscow. Some suggested these developments could pave the way for an official split of Russian bourse, into local and international shares. Several weeks on, how realistic does this look?     


Markets in the Cloud 

CME Group and Nasdaq are among the big exchanges that are hosting more of their business on cloud computing technology. In November, CME announced ambitious collaboration plans with Google  — through a 10-year strategic partnership, they will aim to “accelerate CME Group’s move to the cloud and transform how global derivatives markets operate with technology”. Then, four weeks later, Nasdaq and Amazon Web Services released news of their collaboration – “a multi-year partnership to build the next generation of cloud-enabled infrastructure for the world’s capital markets” This piece will examine how far the trend can go, and where customers may draw the line.


23 MAY

It’s on the (Consolidated) Tape

To boost the unification of their capital markets, EU regulators want to establish live databases that bundle together basic trading information from competing trading venues. These databases, known as consolidated tapes, will cover stocks and bonds. The aim is to help  make the EU a more attractive destination for international investors following the UK’s departure from the single market. But Brussels has run into opposition from banks and exchanges over costs and competition. How likely is it these databases will become a reality and achieve all that policymakers hope?


Carbon Offset Trading - On Fire? 

The global push to reduce carbon emissions is leading to record trading in the permits that producers can buy to offset each tonne of carbon dioxide they generate. But demand to trade carbon-related contracts is only in its infancy; the markets will have to grow bigger and more sophisticated to cover more of total global emissions. And one initiative to boost the market for carbon offsets is now being scaled back, in the wake of fierce debate around whether the traded assets really help avert global warming.This piece will look at how these offset markets will develop.


8 JUNE 

The Future of Crypto Trading is Futures 

Cryptocurrency futures contracts for retail investors are expected to give rise to a hugely-growing market in coming years. There are at least five companies gearing up to offer trading, assuming they receive regulatory approval. Only this year, CME Group, the world’s leading derivatives marketplace, launched options on Micro Bitcoin and Micro Ether futures, further expanding its crypto offerings. But how many trading platforms can the market realistically support? What are the likely factors which will determine winners and losers?


Stemming Payment for Order Flow 

US regulators want to clamp down on payment for order flow, the controversial practice whereby brokers sell trades made on their platform to market makers. The practice, widespread in the US market, is lucrative for retail brokers and enables them to provide zero-commission stock and options trading to attract more customers. But critics say payment for order flow can create conflicts of interest, and encourages brokers to push clients to trade more, which boosts the broker's profit but may not be a successful  investment strategy. Is it likely that the practice will be banned? And if it is, what will come in its place?


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Mackenzie Kyle: 917-551-5052, mackenzie.kyle@ft.com


Katharine Christian +44 (0)7557 943 514, katharine.christian@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


Wednesday 11 May 2022
Risk Management 1: Financial Institutions

Risk Management: Financial Institutions

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in print and online on 11 May


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


War in Ukraine: The New Risks for Financial Institutions

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has ramped up risks for global  financial institutions in all of their operations. We assess the threats and the responses chief risk officers have made, from checking on sanctions against Russian entities, to exiting the country, holding Russian securities, detecting cyber threats, and preparing for inflation and economic stagnation.


Climate Risk: Has COP 26 Made it Harder for Banks?

Climate change has created a need for financial institutions to evaluate the impact of different climate-related scenarios on counterparties, investments, and portfolios. And the COP26 meeting in 2021 has brought agreement on an International Sustainability Standards Board to change reporting standards, a Glasgow Financial Alliance for Net Zero to deliver more than $100 trillion investments to achieve net zero by 2050, and initiatives from central banks to actively supervise climate-related financial risks. But has this only made banks risk management harder? 


Crypto and Money Laundering: What More Can Institutions Do? 

Regulators around the world are stepping up warnings about the use and marketing of cryptocurrencies to investors. They have highlighted risks to market integrity and to consumers, particularly when crypto is used as a speculative investment, as well as significant risks in relation to financial crime and money laundering. But does highlighting the risks mean institutions must act now? And if so, how?


Risk Management Lessons: Credit Suisse, Greensill, Archegos, and More

High profile risk management failures have been identified at various banks in recent years. Was the common factor pressure from senior executives on compliance staff to become ‘more commercial’? Were warnings ignored? Or did a number of small risk management errors come together at the same time? We ask what lessons can be learned from Credit Suisse, Greensill, Archegos, and more


Hybrid Working, Hybrid Risk? How Must Financial Institutions Adapt? 

Companies have been quick to introduce hybrid home and office working models, to ease employees back after the Covid pandemic. But consultants have already identified 5 major risks this brings to institutions: cybersecurity breaches; fraud opportunities; culture and cohesion breakdowns; health and safety dangers; and process failures. And in financial institutions, there is a sixth: regulatory risk. Is hybrid working worth it?   


OpEd: Chief Risk Officer of a Financial Exchange 

Exchanges’ typically apply risk management policies in four areas: credit, market, operational and business. But in an increasingly digital but geopolitically uncertain environment, is this approach too limited? Or too rigid? What else should they be considering? 



Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Erin Alley +1 312 415 2750, erin.alley@ft.com


Katharine Christian +44 (0)7557 943 514, katharine.christian@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Friday 13 May 2022
Innovative Lawyers: Asia-Pacific
Saturday 14 May 2022
Collecting: Frieze (New York)
Monday 16 May 2022
Health at Work 2022: Burst 3 (Single Sponsor)
Friday 20 May 2022
FT Wealth 2022 - Entrepreneurs

FT Wealth: Entrepreneurs

The Financial Times proposes to publish this online FT Report on 20 May 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Old Money Seeks out New Entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley

While Silicon Valley billionaires have long been putting their funds back into tech, financing new entrepreneurs, older money was initially slow to move in. But now families with fortunes established in manufacturing, property and consumer goods, are joining the fray, trying to spot the next unicorn.


Wealth Charts

An overview of entrepreneurs in the world, setting out data on the latest trend with charts and graphics.


Private Jets: Do we have Take-off in Locked-down Hong Kong?

Have Hong Kong's travel rules and the collapse of commercial airline activity led to greater use of private jets? And have the rich been able to gain exemptions from quarantine rules? How do they apply to the owners or bosses of big companies, and other economically significant individuals? Or are the rules so extreme that even the ultra-rich have given up on travel? Local hotels, restaurants and resorts report an increase in demand from the stay-at-home wealthy. 


Divorce for the Wealthy after the Maktoum Case.

The ruler of Dubai was forced to pay a record-breaking £550m to his former wife after a torrid dispute in the English courts. What precedent does this set for other wealthy couples breaking up? Does it make London an even more important centre in the international markets for divorces and settlements?


An International Wealth Management deal Highlights Industry’s Future

We look at a deal that brings together two wealth management advisory companies - one from North American and one from Europe. Together, they will manage more than $50bn of client assets - and the partners aim to compete with large banks in the offshore market for ultra-high net worth families, But some are questioning whether clients will be comfortable with a change in structure and scale. Is this the future of wealth management? Or a step too far for those who prefer the family office approach?  


Are Carbon Offset Assets the Next Niche for Wealth Managers?

Wealth managers and their clients are both seeing investment opportunities in carbon offset projects. Four European wealth management firms say they are attracting interest from more and more investors. One leading Swiss private bank also says there is rising demand for assets linked to carbon pricing, But what are the most suitable assets to back? 


Hot and Expensive Fashion Collectibles

Second hand high fashion items - including trainers - are now so valuable that resale platforms are having to hire specialist staff. In fact, the trainer resale market is now a billion dollar business, with the most sought-after shoes being bought and resold online for a huge profit. To crackdown on counterfeits, eBay is launching a scheme to authenticate high-value trainers sold on its platform in the UK. It is already up and running in the US, but it’s now being extended in the UK with the opening of a warehouse dedicated entirely to inspecting the most expensive sports shoes ever made.


Rich Column

Rhymer Rigby opines on how gentrification has changed. In the past, it was about surrounding oneself with culture and learning. But nowadays it often takes the form of attaching oneself to good causes and philanthropy. Sometimes, it's genuine and great; often it's about planting a few trees before flying in a private jet back to Hollywood.


British Farm Land - A New Look

Business families pile into British agricultural land to benefit from green policies. The aim is not so much to maximise farm production but to create environmentally attractive spaces and secure the subsidies and other benefits that accrue.


PLUS:  Book Review


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Petra Harkay +44 (0) 20 7775 6815, petra.harkay@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised, Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Saturday 21 May 2022
Collecting: Art in Asia
Monday 23 May 2022
Business Education 2022 (3) - Executive Education

Business Education: Executive Education

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on May 23, 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Introduction

An analysis of the leading business schools for executive education programmes and the trends amid turbulent times.


Education Editor’s Letter

Looking at developments in business education and our coverage. 


The Rankings

The twin 2022 rankings of the best providers of open-enrolment and custom executive education programmes.


Management Column

Andrew Hill, the FT’s management editor, explores current thinking around leadership. 


Professor’s Column

A business school professor shares thoughts and research on challenges facing business today. 

What the Customer Wants

The FT chief learning officers survey asked what the people who purchase executive education programmes for businesses want from the courses, and how they think providers perform.


Diversity and Inclusion

Movements such as Black Lives Matter and MeToo have pushed diversity, equity and inclusion up the corporate agenda, driving demand for training to help executives cultivate a diverse and inclusive workforce. 

 

Business School Rivals

Looking at the growing number of alternative executive education providers, from tech disruptors offering online training to consultancy firms.

 

Resilience and Wellbeing

are increasingly viewed as critical for leaders and for creating a healthy and happy workforce, with such concerns coming to the fore during the pandemic. How can executive education foster the necessary skills?

 

Interview

An in-depth interview with a graduate about their studies and what their MBA has meant for their career.


Student Views

Students and graduates share their experiences of study and what came next.


Technology

An FT tech specialist explores developments that will affect business and our working lives. 


In Real Life

A graduate explains what it was like to take an executive education course and how it has affected their career, in their own words.  


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Rachel Spence +44 (0)20 7873 3290, rachel.spence@ft.com

Jackie King +1 917 551 5113, jackie.king@ft.com

Matt Rodford +44 79212 50719, matthew.rodford@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Monday 23 May 2022
FTfm Special: Responsible Investing 1

FTfm: Responsible Investing

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 23 May 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Investing Amid the Ukraine Crisis

How has the war in Ukraine changed the responsible investment landscape? Investors have some tough calls to make, after many companies shuttered their businesses in Russia, while others argued it would be irresponsible to stop providing vital goods. Some investors now deem any investment in Russia beyond the pale, while others consider whether a tougher approach should also be applied to investing in other nations with dire human rights records — and where the threshold should be drawn.


Divestment Versus Engagement

As scrutiny grows of fossil fuel companies, the world's biggest investors are coming under pressure too. Some campaigners have called for them to sell all their stakes in fossil fuel producers. Big money managers like BlackRock have responded by saying that such divestment would simply push fossil fuel assets into the private markets, with less transparency and potentially worse outcomes for the climate. They argue that they can have more impact by keeping their stakes and engaging with energy companies' management. Is this strategy working?


Growing Focus on the 'S' of ESG

The responsible investment agenda has so far had a heavy focus on climate issues. But the Covid-19 pandemic has helped to galvanise a growing wave of attention to social concerns. This article considers how some investors are using their clout on issues such as the wages and working conditions of low-paid workers (and of hugely well-paid executives), unionisation rights, and drug companies' pricing strategies for drugs and vaccines.


Mobilising Investment in Developing Nations

One of the most contentious issues at the COP26 summit was the rich world's breached promise to mobilise $100bn a year in climate finance for developing nations. Even that sum is a fraction of the amount required for climate change mitigation and adaptation in those countries – and private capital will be needed in huge volumes. What prospects are there for "blended finance" and other innovative financial frameworks to attract large flows of private capital to this crucial area of investment?

Regulation and Greenwash

Amid rising concerns about "greenwashing" by companies — and investors — regulators are getting increasingly active. How will the regulatory environment around responsible investment shift over the next few years? Will the newly founded International Sustainable Standards Board succeed in establishing a widely followed global benchmark for sustainability reporting? Or will investors have to contend with a fragmented global landscape of divergent regulatory standards?


Investing in the Energy Transition

As the world seeks to mobilise trillions of dollars behind a shift to low-carbon energy sources, investors have an extraordinary opportunity to profit. But some have raised concerns about bubbles and irrational exuberance in sections of the clean energy sector. What will prove the most successful approach to investing in this space? And how should investors approach the ethical concerns that surround some parts of the global clean tech supply chain?



Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Chris Holt,  +44 (0)7415136450, chris.holt@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised, Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Monday 23 May 2022
Exchanges, Trading & Clearing - Burst 2

Exchanges, Trading & Clearing

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in 3 online bursts, on:

9 May; 23 May; and 8 June 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


9 MAY

Russia’s Stock Exchange - Double Dealing?

In late March, as the war in Ukraine continued, BNY Mellon launched a scheme to allow its clients to swap overseas shares in Russia’s biggest companies for locally-listed equivalents. It followed reports that Russia was considering  having depositary receipts in its major companies delisted from foreign exchanges and converted to securities that would trade in Moscow. Some suggested these developments could pave the way for an official split of Russian bourse, into local and international shares. Several weeks on, how realistic does this look?     


Markets in the Cloud 

CME Group and Nasdaq are among the big exchanges that are hosting more of their business on cloud computing technology. In November, CME announced ambitious collaboration plans with Google  — through a 10-year strategic partnership, they will aim to “accelerate CME Group’s move to the cloud and transform how global derivatives markets operate with technology”. Then, four weeks later, Nasdaq and Amazon Web Services released news of their collaboration – “a multi-year partnership to build the next generation of cloud-enabled infrastructure for the world’s capital markets” This piece will examine how far the trend can go, and where customers may draw the line.


23 MAY

It’s on the (Consolidated) Tape

To boost the unification of their capital markets, EU regulators want to establish live databases that bundle together basic trading information from competing trading venues. These databases, known as consolidated tapes, will cover stocks and bonds. The aim is to help  make the EU a more attractive destination for international investors following the UK’s departure from the single market. But Brussels has run into opposition from banks and exchanges over costs and competition. How likely is it these databases will become a reality and achieve all that policymakers hope?


Carbon Offset Trading - On Fire? 

The global push to reduce carbon emissions is leading to record trading in the permits that producers can buy to offset each tonne of carbon dioxide they generate. But demand to trade carbon-related contracts is only in its infancy; the markets will have to grow bigger and more sophisticated to cover more of total global emissions. And one initiative to boost the market for carbon offsets is now being scaled back, in the wake of fierce debate around whether the traded assets really help avert global warming.This piece will look at how these offset markets will develop.


8 JUNE 

The Future of Crypto Trading is Futures 

Cryptocurrency futures contracts for retail investors are expected to give rise to a hugely-growing market in coming years. There are at least five companies gearing up to offer trading, assuming they receive regulatory approval. Only this year, CME Group, the world’s leading derivatives marketplace, launched options on Micro Bitcoin and Micro Ether futures, further expanding its crypto offerings. But how many trading platforms can the market realistically support? What are the likely factors which will determine winners and losers?


Stemming Payment for Order Flow 

US regulators want to clamp down on payment for order flow, the controversial practice whereby brokers sell trades made on their platform to market makers. The practice, widespread in the US market, is lucrative for retail brokers and enables them to provide zero-commission stock and options trading to attract more customers. But critics say payment for order flow can create conflicts of interest, and encourages brokers to push clients to trade more, which boosts the broker's profit but may not be a successful  investment strategy. Is it likely that the practice will be banned? And if it is, what will come in its place?


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Mackenzie Kyle: 917-551-5052, mackenzie.kyle@ft.com


Katharine Christian +44 (0)7557 943 514, katharine.christian@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


Wednesday 25 May 2022
FT Health: Future of Antibiotics - Burst 5
Thursday 26 May 2022
FT Africa s Fastest Growing Companies

FT Africa’s 

Fastest-growing Companies

The Financial Times proposes to publish an inaugural ranking of Africa’s Fastest Growing Companies, to appear on ft.com on May 3, followed by a tabloid print report in the newspaper on May 26.


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

The Ranking

The list will include data on African companies that have demonstrated fast growth despite the challenging business conditions of the past two years. The ranking is compiled with Statista, the data company.

The Table Topper

A profile of a company at the head of the ranking table, exploring the reasons for its success and its future prospects.  

Sector Focus

An examination of one of the sectors that features prominently in the ranking. The article will look at reasons why the industry has performed well and in which countries it is strongest.

Growth Hotspots

We focus on a city that is home to companies in the list and explore what has made it a hotspot. Can its success be attributed to its business history and culture, strength in particular industries, geography - or other factors?

Strength in Adversity

Looking at companies that showed resilience amid the Covid crisis and managed to survive and thrive in the pandemic.

 

Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Mark Carwardine: +44 (0)20 7873 4880, mark.carwardine@ft.com

Larry Kenney: +44 (0)20 7873 4835, larry.kenney@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Thursday 26 May 2022
Innovative Lawyers: Accelerating Business - Burst 1
Thursday 26 May 2022
Early List Publication - Asia-Pacific Climate Leaders
Friday 27 May 2022
The Business of Formula One

FT Scoreboard:

The Business of F1

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in May 27th, 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

 

How F1 is Cracking America... At Last

After building a strong following in the 1970s and early ‘80s, the sport struggled in the decades since to get attention in the US. Last year’s event in Austin, Texas attracted 400,000 fans, a new record for any Grand Prix, while F1 has signed deals to add races in Miami and Las Vegas. US investors have also bought into the sport. The money is following, with many new US based brands, especially tech companies entering the series as sponsors. What is behind this and is it a bubble or something more permanent? 

 

Profit Drivers

We analyse the new business model of F1 team ownership and value creation. Formula 1 teams have traditionally been cost centres, rather than profit centres, with uncontrolled costs driven upwards by ambitious manufacturers, billionaire shareholders and maverick energy drinks giants. But with a new cost cap now in place, F1 teams are set to become profitable for the first time. This will increase the franchise value of owning a team. 

 

Towards a More Diverse Formula 1

One area where F1 has been a serial failure is in representation of ethic minorities. This has been highlighted by, among other things, the Hamilton Commission, which was set up by F1’s only black driver Lewis Hamilton. With a new FIA president from the Middle East, the first to come from outside Europe, how will F1 and the FIA drive the sport towards encouraging more diversity in participation?

 

All Change: F1 Plans Sustainable Fuels and New Engines

As climate change and environmental, social and governance factors become more important for investors and corporates, F1 is targeting fully sustainable fuel as a priority for the power unit, as it aims to achieve net zero carbon footprint by 2030, significantly cutting down its emissions. How does the sport plan to reduce costs and attract new power unit manufacturers? 

 

 

 

Ferrari: Back in Business

What does F1 mean today to its longest serving team? A sleeping giant since its last world championship success in 2007, the Scuderia has this year come alive again and returned to the winners’ circle. The fallow years on track, during which Ferrari listed on the New York Stock Exchange, demonstrated that sales of their luxury cars do not depend on success on track. 

 

Crypto, Big Tech, Oil: The New Generation of F1 Sponsors

A resurgence in the sport’s popularity is bringing new sponsors to F1 who are trying to appeal to new and younger audiences as F1 expands, particularly in America. The next generation of sponsors ranges from Saudi Arabia’s state oil company to crypto and big tech companies such as Google and Oracle. How do they fit in? 

 

The Next Big Thing

The FT Business of F1 has a track record of putting an early stage spotlight on drivers and team principals who are destined for big things. We talk to a driver who is taking on the most successful driver in the sport’s history and what success looks like in 2022.

 

The Outsider

The name Andretti is one of the most iconic in motorsport. Mario Andretti won the F1 world championship in 1978 and created a dynasty with great success in the US for himself and his son Michael as drivers. Today Michael runs Andretti Racing, with teams in Formula E, Extreme E and Indycar. He wants to bring the Andretti brand to F1 in 2024 as a team owner, believing it will be a huge boost to the series in the US market. But he faces strong resistance from the other F1 teams. What’s going on behind the scenes and will Andretti be on the grid in 2024?

 


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising opportunities please contact:


Nikola Peros +33 (6) 2805 8404, nikola.peros@ft.com


For details of the sponsorship opportunities for The Business if F1 Forum please contact:


Robert Grange +44 (0)7887 656098, robert.grange@ft.com


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Wednesday 01 Jun 2022
Navigating Cyber Risk - Part 2

Navigating Cyber Risk 2 

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 1 June 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Manufacturers Find that IT — and IOT — Adds Risk

Manufacturing and industrial companies the world over are seeking to integrate information technology and the internet of things into their production facilities - to improve their operational efficiency. But this only adds cyber attacks to the to list of possible business risks. A successful attack on IT or IOT devices could shit down facilities entirely and endanger the safety of staff. So how can manufacturers’ factories become digital and connected safely? How can they lock the cyber factory gates?   


Energy Companies Face Cyber Onslaught 

News that the US has charged four Russian government employees for allegedly targeting energy companies in 135 countries shows the extent of the risk to the industry. And the heightened risk of Russia retaliating against the west for sanctions over its invasion of Ukraine. In the past, the Russian hackers’ actions may have caused two emergency shutdowns at an oil plant in Saudi Arabia, and compromised the computer networks of oil and gas firms, nuclear power plants and utility and power transmission companies. According to insurer Hiscox, this is the sector most likely to experience cyber incidents. 


Transport — A Moving Target? 

Transport and travel groups face two distinct, but very real, threats from cyber criminals. First, their systems can come under attack — as was the case when hackers shut down 2,000 computers belonging to the Colorado Department of Transportation, and infiltrated computer systems in New York’s Metropolitan Transit Authority. Second, tier customer data can be hacked — as happened to Easyjet, when 9 million customer email addresses and travel details were stolen plus some credit card information


Logistics Held to Ransom 

In 2018, Bay & Bay Transportation was the target of a highly effective  ransomware attack that locked up the systems it uses to manage its 300-truck fleet. After trying to fix the problem itself, but having no success, the logistics company had no option but to pay a five-figure ransom. But if one medium size trucking company can be shut down this easily, what would happen if a global multinational logistics group were targeted? And how can supply chain managers mitigate this risk? 


The Best Cyber Defence: Mitigation, and Description - Not 100% Protection? 

Companies are beginning to accept that cyber attackers will always get into their systems eventually, as there will always be vulnerabilities and imperfections. So they are adopting new defences: identifying the pathways that could result in worst damage, and disrupting attacks on these pathways where possible. It is more like building roadblocks to slow down and thwart attackers, rather than trying to keep them all out completely. Some call it “consequence-driven, cyber-informed engineering” or CEE. 


OpEd: What I Learned When my Business was Hacked 

A chief technology officer or chief risk officer talks candidly about the lessons learned from an attempted cyber attack or a data breach, and how it helped the business better protect itself in the future.  


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


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Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on



Wednesday 08 Jun 2022
Exchanges, Trading & Clearing - Burst 3

Exchanges, Trading & Clearing

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in 3 online bursts, on:

9 May; 23 May; and 8 June 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


9 MAY

Russia’s Stock Exchange - Double Dealing?

In late March, as the war in Ukraine continued, BNY Mellon launched a scheme to allow its clients to swap overseas shares in Russia’s biggest companies for locally-listed equivalents. It followed reports that Russia was considering  having depositary receipts in its major companies delisted from foreign exchanges and converted to securities that would trade in Moscow. Some suggested these developments could pave the way for an official split of Russian bourse, into local and international shares. Several weeks on, how realistic does this look?     


Markets in the Cloud 

CME Group and Nasdaq are among the big exchanges that are hosting more of their business on cloud computing technology. In November, CME announced ambitious collaboration plans with Google  — through a 10-year strategic partnership, they will aim to “accelerate CME Group’s move to the cloud and transform how global derivatives markets operate with technology”. Then, four weeks later, Nasdaq and Amazon Web Services released news of their collaboration – “a multi-year partnership to build the next generation of cloud-enabled infrastructure for the world’s capital markets” This piece will examine how far the trend can go, and where customers may draw the line.


23 MAY

It’s on the (Consolidated) Tape

To boost the unification of their capital markets, EU regulators want to establish live databases that bundle together basic trading information from competing trading venues. These databases, known as consolidated tapes, will cover stocks and bonds. The aim is to help  make the EU a more attractive destination for international investors following the UK’s departure from the single market. But Brussels has run into opposition from banks and exchanges over costs and competition. How likely is it these databases will become a reality and achieve all that policymakers hope?


Carbon Offset Trading - On Fire? 

The global push to reduce carbon emissions is leading to record trading in the permits that producers can buy to offset each tonne of carbon dioxide they generate. But demand to trade carbon-related contracts is only in its infancy; the markets will have to grow bigger and more sophisticated to cover more of total global emissions. And one initiative to boost the market for carbon offsets is now being scaled back, in the wake of fierce debate around whether the traded assets really help avert global warming.This piece will look at how these offset markets will develop.


8 JUNE 

The Future of Crypto Trading is Futures 

Cryptocurrency futures contracts for retail investors are expected to give rise to a hugely-growing market in coming years. There are at least five companies gearing up to offer trading, assuming they receive regulatory approval. Only this year, CME Group, the world’s leading derivatives marketplace, launched options on Micro Bitcoin and Micro Ether futures, further expanding its crypto offerings. But how many trading platforms can the market realistically support? What are the likely factors which will determine winners and losers?


Stemming Payment for Order Flow 

US regulators want to clamp down on payment for order flow, the controversial practice whereby brokers sell trades made on their platform to market makers. The practice, widespread in the US market, is lucrative for retail brokers and enables them to provide zero-commission stock and options trading to attract more customers. But critics say payment for order flow can create conflicts of interest, and encourages brokers to push clients to trade more, which boosts the broker's profit but may not be a successful  investment strategy. Is it likely that the practice will be banned? And if it is, what will come in its place?


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


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or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


Saturday 11 Jun 2022
Collecting: Art in Europe
Monday 13 Jun 2022
Business Education 2022 (4) - Financial Training

Business Education: 

Financial Training

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 13 June 2022

Advertising booking deadline: 16th May 2022

(Advertising copy deadline: 23rd May 2022)


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

 

Masters in Finance Trends

We highlight the stories and trends behind the FT’s Masters in Finance rankings: who are the leaders and change-makers? 

 

Masters in Finance Rankings

The FT’s Masters in Finance rankings tables: Information and analysis.


Sustainability

Ahead of COP27 in November, and with growing concerns about the outcome of COP26, what are business schools doing to develop new research, teaching and projects to help executives and entrepreneurs address the challenges of climate change?


Finance Hubs

Can the existing financial centres - such as London, Paris, Hong Kong and New York -  remain attractive locations to study in as globalisation is challenged by developments such as US-China trade tensions and the Ukrainian crisis?

 

Skills Development

Finance jobs increasingly require software engineering/ coding skills. What do banks expect from job applicants and what they are doing to fill the gaps?

 

Financial Crime

The costs of economic crime are high and law enforcement is under-resourced, which creates potential and growing demand for financial professionals in this area. Are training providers responding? 

 

Accounting

Accounting as a specialism and what training providers are doing to raise standards after scandals at companies.

 

 


Career Opportunities

What new and disruptive career paths are emerging? Are traditional pathways changing? How do finance courses equip students with the skills and networks to succeed in global finance?


Opinion

An expert teaching in the region writes about a pressing issue on financial training.


Growth of Fintech

How are business schools helping students acquire the skills and knowledge to secure roles in the financial technology sector?


Entrepreneurship

The graduates of finance courses who go on to launch their own start-ups rather than look for banking and finance roles in financial institutions. 


Specialisations

What are the options for students to pursue financial training and specialise in different disciplines, such as marketing or public finance? 


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Rachel Blake +44 (0)20 7873 3290, rachel.spence@ft.com

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Matthew Rodford +44 79212 50719, matthew.rodford@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


Monday 13 Jun 2022
FT Asia-Pacific Climate Leaders

Asia-Pacific 

Climate Leaders

The Financial Times proposes to publish this Special Report on 13 June 2022

Winner early list publication: 26 May 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Introduction

As emissions in Europe level off, Asia-Pacific’s continue to soar. How serious are the region’s policymakers and companies about sustainability?


Who Tops the Inaugural List

What has it done right, and can its older rivals, with their long-established business relationships, hope to catch up?


India

The biggest country on the Climate Leaders list, has a mixed record on sustainability – with China, for example, it watered down COP26’s call to cut the use of coal power. We look at the challenges that the country’s sustainability-minded businesses face. 


Japan accounts for by far the largest number of businesses on the list. We report on the regulatory and cultural contexts that put it in the top slot


Think-piece

How can Asia’s poorer countries reconcile the need for development with the battle against climate change? What responsibilities, if any, do developed countries have?


South Korea tops the “green society” category in the latest Green Future Index report from MIT Technology Review Insights. We look at how companies are serving such a sustainability-minded population


China is by far the region’s biggest economy – yet it is excluded from the Climate Leaders list because of poor data transparency. How are businesses and regulators trying to tighten up sustainability reporting?




Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Hiroko Hoshino +81 3 5219 2345, hiroko.hoshino@ft.com


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Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.





Thursday 16 Jun 2022
Europes Leading Patent Law Firms

Europe’s Leading Patents Law Firms

The Financial Times proposes to publish this Special Report on 16 June 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


1. The growth in technology is triggering questions about patent law, particularly in relation to artificial intelligence: can a machine patent an invention - or is it prohibited from doing so because it is not a living person? The UK says a machine can’t but courts in Australia and South Africa disagree. How can patents be enforced in the metaverse? Can something created by a machine be protected by IP law? 


2. China is trying to protect its IP and gain advantage over the west. The country has been accused of being a “copycat” nation and stealing IP. It is now seeking to be more assertive in suing overseas firms in its courts over patent disputes; it has also become more assertive in setting lower licence fees and imposing anti-suit injunctions in its courts. What does this all mean for the west?


3.  One Big Tech general counsel has said the US system generates aggressive litigation and has called for an end to forum shopping around for the most favourable courts - a quarter of all US patent litigation is filed at a single courthouse. There have been similar calls for US reform. Is this fair? And what action could be taken?


4. How are law firms dealing with the current ‘war for talent’, which has caused salaries to soar among associate lawyers and seen UK law firm partners jump ship to US firms. Is the war for talent more acute in IP/patent law because it is such a specialist (and lucrative) area?


5. India and South Africa recently proposed at the World Trade Organisation that IP on Covid vaccines and drugs be waived for three years to allow poorer countries to benefit. What lessons have been learnt from the pandemic about IP and possible future co-operation between companies? 

 

6. Green patents are a fast growing area. What are the main areas of investment - and should there be fast-tracking approval for green inventions? 

 

7. How have Ukrainian GCs’ cases changed since the start of the war? Some have reported several European patent dispute challenges — from Russian companies encroaching on patents, to holding European patent disputes by video call while the war goes on. 

 

8. Russia has adopted a zero compensation policy to patent owners in so-called ‘unfriendly’ countries. But what does this measure actually mean in practice? 

 

9. US courts could become an increasingly important aspect of patent disputes in the EU. This year, a US federal district court, for the second time in recent history, forced a party to provide evidence for use in German patent litigation proceedings. This could prove a game-changer in patent disputes between European and US parties. 


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


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Alex Roszkowski on 07481 606 760, alex.roszkowski@ft.com


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Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Friday 17 Jun 2022
Sustainable Mobility

Sustainable Mobility

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 17 June 2022


We plan to include the following pieces of content (please note that this list is provisional):


Introduction: Has the Route to Sustainable Mobility Changed?  

What will be the lasting effects of the coronavirus on sustainable urban mobility?  In what ways are consumer demands and behaviours evolving? How can we protect passengers and staff in public transport?  What will be the impact of changes in public policy and regulation? In a decarbonising world, how are coordinated approaches addressing the climate challenge? How can we develop a cohesive, safe and resilient system for passengers and freight where road, rail and air come together and multimodal mobility can thrive?


Charticle: e-Transport Trends after Covid 

After the first Covid lockdowns, transport data suggested commuter habits were changing and would not return to pre-coronavirus patterns. City dwellers began shunning public transport in favour of travel methods that increase social distancing, presenting an opportunity for electric mobility devices. A McKinsey study suggested that a higher share of people would use cars, bikes or devices such as e-scooters and e-bikes than did before the virus struck. But has this trend continued into 2022 as workers return to offices? We chart the latest trends.   


San Francisco's Robotaxis

Initially, they were only made available to certain tech company employees. Now, they can be used by the public at large. Cruise, the self-driving company backed by General Motors and Honda, recently announced a public service in San Francisco. After delays in trying to get paying customers into autonomous ride-hailing vehicles, is this a big breakthrough?  


Spain and Hydrogen 

Spain has the ideal conditions to become Europe’s green hydrogen hub, according to… the county’s own prime minister. But it seems some automotive companies are starting to think he might be right. A US engine maker has announced it will build a plant in Spain to make electrolyser systems to produce green hydrogen, a zero-carbon fuel created using renewable energy rather than fossil fuels.

But are hydrogen powered vehicles or ships really going to be the future anyorialtime soon? 





What Does the Car of the Future Look Like?

The automotive industry will need to move faster than before and innovate in a wide range of areas such as cameras, software to power autonomous driving, central computing, batteries, electric motors, data analytics, and artificial intelligence. And, at the FT’s Future of the Car conference, the CEO of a leading carmaker explained how the next wave of technology can allow us to set new standards for sustainable, safe and personal mobility, while making the industry carbon-free. We share his vision of the future in an edited transcript.


Q&A: Accelerating Electric Vehicle Adoption 

Pressure to hasten the transition from internal combustion engines to electric power is increasing but collaboration is needed between all stakeholders - energy providers, national and local governments, and the auto industry. They need to work together to overcome the problems of scaling-up production, sales and charging infrastructure. So we asked representatives of these stakeholders to answer a series of questions about doing this more quickly. Here, we present their edited answers. 


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


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Nick Phillips on +44 (0)20 7873 4216, nick.phillips@ft.com


Maria Gonzalez +34 91 564 1810, Fax +34 91 564 1255, maria.gonzalez@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Saturday 18 Jun 2022
Collecting: Art & Antiques
Monday 20 Jun 2022
Upskilling - Burst 1

Upskilling

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over two bursts: 

20 & 27 June 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


June 20, 2022


Train Them up, Watch them Leave 

Faced not just with a Great Resignation but also with a War for Talent, how can companies resolve the upskilling dilemma? 


Proximity Alert 

For young employees, the office is an immersive learning environment – or so many companies argue, as they worry about the consequences of remote working. Are they right? 


According to the CBI, by 2030 9 out of 10 employees will need to reskill to keep up with changing job roles/demands; the WEF says 40 per cent of core skills in the average job will change in the next 5 years; and governments are desperate to upskill the workforce to boost productivity. So what actually *are* the skills that employees should be acquiring? And if those CBI/WEF stats are true, how can anyone keep up? 


====================================================


June 27, 2022


Future-proofing the Boardroom

Blockchain, AI, carbon accounting – many of the knottiest issues confronting businesses emerged long after today’s board members first learned their trade. How can businesses ensure that their boards are up to speed? 


Survival Skills – For the Planet

Pressure from ESG investors, together with the dawning realisation that net-zero is not something that you can put off till tomorrow, are forcing businesses to rethink all their processes. What skills are chief sustainability officers looking for, and how are businesses and training providers responding? 


High Intensity – But Low Impact? 

More and more training providers are offering bootcamps – short, intense courses that aim to get participants quickly up to speed with coding and other in-demand skills. Even the UK government appears to favour this model. But does it work? And what are the most (cost-)effective ways for businesses and workers to equip themselves with new skills?



Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Matt Rodford +44 79212 50719, matthew.rodford@ft.com


Rachel Spence +44 (0)20 7873 3290, rachel.spence@ft.com


Jackie King +1 917 551 5113, jackie.king@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Monday 20 Jun 2022
FTfm Special: ETFs and Asset Management

FTfm: ETFs and 

Asset Management

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 20 June 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Private Assets - The Next Big Thing for European Asset Managers

Traditional asset management groups are racing to expand their offerings in alternative investments as they seek to boost profitability and head off competition from private equity giants. In the US, fund companies are moving into private lending, real estate, infrastructure and stakes in private companies - often by acquiring alternative specialists. European asset managers are also joining the private asset land-grab, and groups including Schroders, Abrdn, RWC Partners and Edmond de Rothschild have earmarked it as an area for expansion. 


China - The Pension Management Opportunity 

China’s population providea huge potential market for western asset

management companies. In fact, the largest of them is already there: its wealth management joint venture in China has been given permission to start selling pension products in two major cities – Chengdu and Guangzhou. Others are expected to follow, to access the huge potential pension market. But is the political risk attached to operating in China worth taking for all but the largest?


Regulatory Divergence Post Brexit - Will Asset Managers Take Back Control?  

The government’s ‘Benefits of Brexit’ policy paper, published in January 2022, identified financial services as a sector with clear potential to deliver a post-Brexit economic dividend. But so far there has been little divergence from EU rules. According to the UK government, it is looking to cut the regulatory burdens on some investment firms by returning oversight of activities to the UK Financial Conduct Authority, as was the case before the EU's MiFID II rules were introduced. But will the UK ever go back to a pre-MiFID fund management world?  



ETF Providers and Fund Managers - Finally Accepting Crypto?  

Institutional investors acceptance of cryptocurrencies, as an asset class to hold, has been slow - mainly due to the volatility seen in crypto pricing. Ruffer, the normally cautious UK fund manager, turned heads in the City in late 2020 when it took a roughly $600m position in bitcoin - but it exited the trade only months later after growing nervous about a “speculative frenzy” in the cryptocurrency. So is the only low-volatility way for asset managers investors to gain exposure to buy into the companies enabling trading? Or will more stable digital assets be better for fund managers? 


Do Ownership Structures Matter? 

Does the ownership structure of asset management businesses matter? And, if so, why? Some have suggested that partnerships create a culture that encourages longer-term investment decisions rather than chasing short-term returns. But is that supported by the evidence? We look at how groups are structuring themselves to lure and retain talent and  better align themselves with clients. We also ask whether listed assets managers take a different approach to privately held groups.  


Direct Indexing - A Fund Management Growth Story 

Last year, Morningstar joined the race to provide direct indexing products - which give retail investors the opportunity to buy into a customised basket of stocks, selected according to a theme or their personal preferences. Its acquisition of Moorgate Benchmarks followed similar deals for direct indexing providers by BlackRock, Vanguard and Morgan Stanley. Cerulli Associates forecasts that in the US alone direct indexing strategies will account for $4.7tn of assets by 2030, 8 per cent of all adviser-managed assets. So is this a threat to traditional asset managers? Or an opportunity?  




Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Chris Holt,  +44 (0)7415136450, chris.holt@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


Wednesday 22 Jun 2022
Innovative Lawyers: FT Business Legal Leaders
Wednesday 22 Jun 2022
Health at Work 2022: Burst 4 (Single Sponsor)
Saturday 25 Jun 2022
Collecting: Summer
Saturday 25 Jun 2022
Art of Fashion: Jewellery 2022
Monday 27 Jun 2022
The Future of Cities
Monday 27 Jun 2022
Upskilling - Burst 2

Upskilling

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over two bursts: 

20 & 27 June 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


June 20, 2022


Train Them up, Watch them Leave 

Faced not just with a Great Resignation but also with a War for Talent, how can companies resolve the upskilling dilemma? 


Proximity Alert 

For young employees, the office is an immersive learning environment – or so many companies argue, as they worry about the consequences of remote working. Are they right? 


According to the CBI, by 2030 9 out of 10 employees will need to reskill to keep up with changing job roles/demands; the WEF says 40 per cent of core skills in the average job will change in the next 5 years; and governments are desperate to upskill the workforce to boost productivity. So what actually *are* the skills that employees should be acquiring? And if those CBI/WEF stats are true, how can anyone keep up? 


====================================================


June 27, 2022


Future-proofing the Boardroom

Blockchain, AI, carbon accounting – many of the knottiest issues confronting businesses emerged long after today’s board members first learned their trade. How can businesses ensure that their boards are up to speed? 


Survival Skills – For the Planet

Pressure from ESG investors, together with the dawning realisation that net-zero is not something that you can put off till tomorrow, are forcing businesses to rethink all their processes. What skills are chief sustainability officers looking for, and how are businesses and training providers responding? 


High Intensity – But Low Impact? 

More and more training providers are offering bootcamps – short, intense courses that aim to get participants quickly up to speed with coding and other in-demand skills. Even the UK government appears to favour this model. But does it work? And what are the most (cost-)effective ways for businesses and workers to equip themselves with new skills?



Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Matt Rodford +44 79212 50719, matthew.rodford@ft.com


Rachel Spence +44 (0)20 7873 3290, rachel.spence@ft.com


Jackie King +1 917 551 5113, jackie.king@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Monday 27 Jun 2022
Globetrotter: Digital (Single Sponsor)
Thursday 30 Jun 2022
Innovative Lawyers: Accelerating Business - Burst 2
Friday 01 Jul 2022
FT Wealth 2022 - July

FT Wealth July

The Financial Times proposes to publish this online FT Report on 1 July 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Editor's Letter: Wealth in Charts

An overview of a topic of importance to high earners or wealthy individuals, setting out the relevant data in a series of annotated charts and graphics.


Wealth Managers and Know your Customer After Ukraine

Following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the US, UK and EU announced sweeping sanctions and export control measures against Russia’s banks, elites, and other state firms. But, as the National Law Review later warned, in an expanding digital world, it becomes easier for sophisticated individuals and entities to disguise identities, nationalities, and location. Wealth managers must therefore conduct robust due diligence to examine all potential ties to Russia, and ensure know your customer (KYC) and anti-money laundering (AML) controls are in place. Among the techniques advised are geolocation screening, programs to identify a customer’s counterparties, and IP address monitoring. But how will all this affect their ability to serve non-sanctioned clients?   


ESG and Superyachts

While the Ukraine crisis has focused attention on yachts as a means for Russian oligarchs to escape political scrutiny, environmental campaigners have long suggested greater environmental scrutiny is needed, too. According to a report in The Guardian, a superyacht with permanent crew, helicopter pad, submarines and pools emits about 7,020 tonnes of carbon dioxide a year — 1,500 times more than a typical family car. And yet sailing yachts used to be the ultimate in green transport. Can new technologies restore the vessels’ ESG credentials?  


Doing Good but Better  - The Role of Philanthropy Consultants

Wealthy individuals can employ legions of advisers to maximise the financial returns on their personal investments. So shouldn’t they seek the same level of expertise and advice on their philanthropic projects and support of non--profit groups? Philanthropy consultants think so. One firm says: “Whether you are a donor looking to accomplish more with your money or a nonprofit leader concerned with the future of your organisation, [we] can help you reach your objectives… we work with nonprofits, foundations, investors, philanthropists, and corporations to provide strategy consulting and leadership...” And its clients say it has been making a difference to non-profit organisations for decades. So how does the firm do it? And what exactly is the business model of a non-profit consultant?  


Divorce for the Wealthy after the Maktoum case

The ruler of Dubai was forced to pay a record-breaking £550m to his former wife after a torrid dispute in the English courts. What precedent does this set for other wealthy couples breaking up? Does it make London an even more important centre in the international markets for divorces and settlements?


Hong Kong v Singapore in Wealth Management

Pre-Covid Hong Kong was comfortably ahead of Singapore for wealth management business — as measured by assets under management. Hong Kong had $1.9tn of cross-border wealth versus the city state’s $1.1tn. Together, they were even larger than Switzerland, which has $2.4tn. But how has that changed in the wake of the pandemic and the political crackdown in Hong Kong?


A New Dawn for US Fossil Fuel Billionaires

Dario Kenner, the author of Carbon Inequality: The Role of the Richest in Climate Change, coined the term "polluter elite" to describe the wealthiest in society who invest extensively in fossil fuels. But earlier this year, Reliance Industries — the company led by Mukesh Ambani, Asia’s richest man, announced plans to invest $76bn in clean energy projects. This was an increase on an earlier commitment of $10bn by the world’s biggest fossil-fuel billionaire. Is this the start of an attempted new beginning for the fossil fuel elite? 


Guest Column 

A high-profile American businessman comments on the challenges for entrepreneur families and their companies. 


Rich Column

Rhymer Rigby opines on a question of the moment for dynasties, philanthropists, or wealthy investors.     


PLUS:  Book review


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Petra Harkay +44 (0) 20 7775 6815, petra.harkay@ft.com


Katharine Christian +44 (0)7557 943 514, katharine.christian@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Saturday 02 Jul 2022
Globetrotter: Magazine (Single Sponsor)
Friday 08 Jul 2022
Watches & Jewellery: Jewellery Special

Watches & Jewellery: Jewellery

The Financial Times proposes to publish this Special Report on 08 July 2022.


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Jewellers in the Metaverse

Though the industry is still in the early stages of figuring out what role it can play in the metaverse, the potential business opportunity is substantial. What different approaches are jewellers taking and why, and how do they see these virtual forays translating into sales. 


Restoring Heirlooms

How do watch brands that have been around for centuries deal with repairing and servicing vintage pieces that are brought in. While there is no shortage of third-party repair shops that can undertake such a task, older watch brands have the benefit of comprehensive archives for each part, however old, and some are even now 3D-printing parts long out of circulation, in order to restore watches to their former glory. 


Tuning in

With more jewellery and watches brands are exploring podcasts, what are the benefits of the audio medium for what is a visual product? How does it affect brand awareness and sales? Both larger brands as well as smaller independent companies have also used the medium for bespoke commissions.


Round-up

Jewellery brands are taking a leaf out of the fashion house playbook this summer by embracing the concept of the ‘destination launch’ for their couture collections. High jewellery companies are continuing to invest in VIP events, where clients are taken on money-can’t-buy experiences. How effective are these strategies in making sure new collections sell as well as possible?  


Benefit Corporations

What is expected of a jeweller to attain B Corp status, what benefits does it bring and how does it compare with other certifications such as the Butterfly Mark or Fairtrade. 


Value of Smiley Face

In the past 50 years, the universal yellow and black smiley face emblem has been reinterpreted by artists, musicians, as well as jewellers. One brand was built on the back of the popular emoji, while others have entire lines dedicated to it. Just how successful has it been? 

African Jewellers

As the V&A opens its Fashion Africa show, we look at the rise of African jewellers and how the increasing spotlight on Africa’s fashion designers is affecting them.  


My Favourite Pieces: A supreme court judge talks about her brooch collection.


Plus News in brief from the watch and jewellery industry


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Yoon Sun Oh +33 (0)6 66 83 31 54, yoonsun.oh@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Monday 11 Jul 2022
Health at Work 2022: Burst 5 (Single Sponsor)
Friday 15 Jul 2022
Hydrogen
Monday 18 Jul 2022
Aerospace and Defence: Burst 1
Tuesday 19 Jul 2022
Global Security
Tuesday 19 Jul 2022
FT Health: Future of Antibiotics - Burst 6
Wednesday 20 Jul 2022
Aerospace and Defence: Burst 2
Friday 22 Jul 2022
Japan and Sustainability
Monday 25 Jul 2022
Tech Champions: Call for Entries (Single Sponsor)
Thursday 28 Jul 2022
Innovative Lawyers: Accelerating Business - Burst 3
Friday 26 Aug 2022
African Development
Saturday 27 Aug 2022
Art of Fashion AW22
Friday 02 Sep 2022
Watches & Jewellery: September
Friday 02 Sep 2022
FT Wealth 2022 - September
Monday 12 Sep 2022
Business Education 2022 (5) - Masters in Management
Monday 12 Sep 2022
Health at Work 2022: Burst 6 (Single Sponsor)
Monday 19 Sep 2022
FTfm Special: Responsible Investing 2
Monday 19 Sep 2022
Next Tech Growth Markets
Tuesday 20 Sep 2022
Energy Transition
Monday 26 Sep 2022
Business Education: Asia-Pacific Business Schools

Asia Pacific Business Education

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on Sept 26, 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


The Rise of Asian Pacific Business Education

Demand is increasing for business qualifications among Asian students, but regional political and economic disruptions, new practices and intensifying competition are changing the patterns of demand and the nature of schools.


Covid Adaptations

Asian business schools and their host countries were early to respond to coronavirus with tough control measures to limit infection spread. A look at the measures that have since been introduced to ensure safety on campus and evolve their teaching with practices such as more blended learning.


What Employers Want

An examination of trends among Asian-based recruiters: how far do they value different business education degrees, what skills are they seeking and from which countries and institutions are they hiring?


Regional Customisation

Asian schools are increasingly developing their own case studies, teaching resources and curricula tailored to reflect the particular experiences of businesses, corporate culture and values. Examples of innovations and best practices.


The Shifting Attraction of the West.

High costs, less certain job prospects and ambivalence towards immigration reflected in visa regimes have shaken up the traditional lure of North American and European institutions for some Asians, while the lure of the most prestigious schools continues to attract some of the best.


Foreign Campuses

A growing number of Asian business schools are expanding their offerings in other parts of the world with campuses and partnerships, to give their students experience elsewhere and to attract students from other continents. American and European schools are taking similar measures in Asia.


Professor Op-ed

Insights from a leading academic based in Asia on cutting-edge research and trends of use to business and management.


Emerging Asia.

An exploration of the nature of fresh demand for business education and local and regional providers from fast-growing countries such as Indonesia, Vietnam and the Philippines.


Regional Case Studies

Examples of provision in different countries such as well established schools in

China, Hong Kong, Singapore and Australia, to regional players in Japan, Korea and

India.


Directory

An interactive listing of the leading schools in the region by institution, country, course, fees, student numbers and other key indicators.


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Rachel Spence +44 (0)20 7873 3290, rachel.spence@ft.com

Jackie King +1 917 551 5113, jackie.king@ft.com

Matt Rodford +44 79212 50719, matthew.rodford@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised, Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

Tuesday 27 Sep 2022
Health at Work 2022: Burst 7 (Single Sponsor)
Tuesday 27 Sep 2022
Investing in America
Thursday 29 Sep 2022
Innovative Lawyers: Accelerating Business - Burst 4
Saturday 01 Oct 2022
Collecting: Design Art
Monday 03 Oct 2022
FTfm Special: ETFs 3
Friday 07 Oct 2022
Watches & Jewellery: Asia Special
Saturday 08 Oct 2022
Collecting: Frieze Week
Friday 14 Oct 2022
Innovative Lawyers: Europe
Saturday 15 Oct 2022
Collecting: Paris Art Scene
Monday 17 Oct 2022
Business Education 2022 (6) - Executive MBA
Monday 24 Oct 2022
FTfm Special: Fixed Income 2
Monday 24 Oct 2022
FT Health: Communicable Diseases
Thursday 27 Oct 2022
Innovative Lawyers: Accelerating Business - Burst 5
Thursday 27 Oct 2022
Investing in Italy
Friday 28 Oct 2022
FT Wealth 2022 - Family Office
Tuesday 01 Nov 2022
Tech Champions: Microsite Launch (Single Sponsor)
Friday 04 Nov 2022
Watches & Jewellery: November
Monday 07 Nov 2022
Navigating Cyber Risk - Part 3
Monday 07 Nov 2022
Health at Work 2022: Burst 8 -Tabloid (Single Sponsor)
Tuesday 08 Nov 2022
Tech Champions: Magazine (Single Sponsor)
Tuesday 08 Nov 2022
Managing Climate Change
Wednesday 09 Nov 2022
Innovative Lawyers: Accelerating Business - Burst 6
Friday 18 Nov 2022
Diversity Leaders
Saturday 26 Nov 2022
Collecting: Art in The Americas
Wednesday 30 Nov 2022
The Future of Energy
Friday 02 Dec 2022
FT Wealth 2022 - December
Saturday 03 Dec 2022
Style: Christmas Gift Guide 2022
Monday 05 Dec 2022
Business Education 2022 (7) - European Business School
Friday 09 Dec 2022
Innovative Lawyers: North America
Wednesday 18 Jan 2023
Health at Work 2022: Burst 9 (Single Sponsor)
Monday 13 Feb 2023
Business Education 2023 (1) - Global MBA Rankings
Monday 13 Mar 2023
Business Education 2023 (2) - Online Learning
Tuesday 28 Mar 2023
Health at Work 2023: Burst 1 - Microsite Launch (Single Sponsor)
Monday 10 Apr 2023
Health at Work 2023: Burst 2 (Single Sponsor)
Monday 15 May 2023
Health at Work 2023: Burst 3 (Single Sponsor)
Monday 22 May 2023
Business Education 2023 (3) - Executive Education
Monday 12 Jun 2023
Business Education 2023 (4) - Financial Training
Wednesday 21 Jun 2023
Health at Work 2023: Burst 4 (Single Sponsor)
Monday 10 Jul 2023
Health at Work 2023: Burst 5 (Single Sponsor)
Monday 11 Sep 2023
Health at Work 2023: Burst 6 (Single Sponsor)
Monday 11 Sep 2023
Business Education 2023 (5) - Masters in Management
Tuesday 26 Sep 2023
Health at Work 2023: Burst 7 (Single Sponsor)
Monday 16 Oct 2023
Business Education 2023 (6) - Executive MBA
Monday 06 Nov 2023
Health at Work 2023: Burst 8 -Tabloid (Single Sponsor)
Monday 04 Dec 2023
Business Education 2023 (7) - European Business School
Wednesday 17 Jan 2024
Health at Work 2023: Burst 9 (Single Sponsor)

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