SPECIAL REPORTS CALENDAR

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Special Reports Calendar

Date
Publication
Monday 06 Jul 2020
E-Mobility 1 - Burst 1

E-Mobility

 

 

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in 2020

Digital on 6th July

Print on 9th September

 

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

 

1) What is e-mobility and how will it impact the way we move around in the future?

 

2) How patchy access to efficient charging stations has been seen as a roadblock to the broader uptake of electric-vehicles and how this can be countered – this could be a good explainer video

 

3) From traffic management to smart parking, how automation is impacting e-mobility/smart transport. 

 

4) Can e-mobility/smart transport become feasible in remote, rural areas? If so, what will it take? And do the benefits to society outweigh the costs?

 

5) How the migration from internal combustion engines to electric propulsion is changing transport

 

6) How can public and private e-mobility/smart transport systems be best harmonised?

 

7) How technological advances driven by Formula E can be adopted by mainstream automakers (IE: improved battery technology, weight reduction). And what impact will this have on the likes of Tesla as other car-makers move into this arena?

 

8) With sensor-based technology controlling traffic flow and helping improve transport infrastructure, how will smart cities more closely interact with smart transportation? (IE: automated traffic lights that change to allow automated emergency vehicles to get to their destination faster).

 

 

Information

 

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

 

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

 

Nick Phillips on +44 (0)20 7873 4216, nick.phillips@ft.com

Caitlin O’Sullivan +44 (0)20 7873 3743, caitlin.osullivan@ft.com

 

or your usual Financial Times representative.

 

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 

 

Wednesday 08 Jul 2020
Working from Home - Burst 3
Monday 13 Jul 2020
E-Mobility 1 - Burst 2
Wednesday 15 Jul 2020
Rethinking Energy

Rethinking Energy
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report July 15, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Floating Offshore Wind Turbines - we survey the sector

Grid Networks
Redesigning power grids is central to more widespread adoption of greener energy supplies. What should future grids look like and what is required to achieve this

Investor Guide
What to look for when investing in energy to mitigate climate change: Alice Ross, author of a forthcoming guide published later this year, helps FT readers look to the future of energy.

Opinion
How the global health crisis is enabling the world to reimagine the future of energy.

Business Models
What type of energy companies and business models will thrive in the future?

Hydrogen 
We ask whether - and if yes, why - this technology is finally having its moment as more companies invest in green hydrogen fuel projects.

Direct Air Capture of CO2
Venture capital groups and global resources companies have poured tens of millions of dollars into “direct air capture” technology this year, at a time of growing concern over climate change. Is this technology viable and what role will it play if any in the future of energy?

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Nick Eyles on +44 (0)20 7873 3613, nick.eyles@ft.com
Charles Peck on +44 (0)20 7775 6448, charles.peck@ft.com
Tom Eaton on +44 (0)20 7873 3680, tom.eaton@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 

Thursday 16 Jul 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Lawyers in a Crisis 8
Monday 20 Jul 2020
Call for Entries - UK s Leading Management Consultants
Monday 20 Jul 2020
E-Mobility 1 - Burst 3
Monday 20 Jul 2020
FTfm Special: Responsible Investing - Burst 1
Thursday 23 Jul 2020
Japan and Sustainability

Japan and Sustainability

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report July 24th, 2020.

 

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

 

Sport and Climate Change

Extreme weather conditions are increasingly threatening sport. Be it football pitches too waterlogged to play, or famous seaside golf courses crashing into the sea. What are the ways in which the 2020 Olympics and sport in general plan to adapt to climate change?

 

Video

Climate change effect on Olympics: Tokyo has already relocated the Olympic marathon event to rural northern Japan to avoid extreme heat concerns. The outdoor swimming events might be moving too. 

 

Infrastructure

Big sporting events are increasingly trying to work out how to have more sustainable events. We look at how this thinking has influenced the 2020 Olympics as a variety of sports have made efforts to become more sustainable - and we ask whether they are moving fast enough?

 

Activism

Activist investors have invested in several Japanese companies and in some cases forced corporate changes. How much does this signal a new readiness by Japanese groups to respond to shareholder demands? Is this a long-awaited investment opportunity. Will this facilitate or hinder some investors’ new emphasis on sustainability and ESG considerations? 

 

Sustainable Development Goals

We look at ways in which Japanese business has incorporated SDGs into their products and operations

Overview plus case studies from an investor and a manufacturer

 

Greenwash or Green Reporting?

An op-ed from a leading investor on Japanese progress when it comes to “greening” companies’ reporting and disclosure requirements.

 

Interview with an Advocate of More Sustainable Business and Finance 

What needs to happen to deepen the ability of Japanese business to create value in a sustainable manner.

 

Professional Services Firms

We look at the role played by accountants and law firms in Japan in driving or hindering progress towards more sustainable business practices

 

 

Information

 

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

 

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

 

Hiroko Hoshino +81 3 5219 2345, hiroko.hoshino@ft.com

Kazue Hasegawa +81 3 5219 2324, kazue.hasegawa@ft.com

Sunny Ningsun +81 90 3207 7568, sunny.ningsun@ft.com

Tomoko Asanuma +81 3 5219 2323, tomoko.asanuma@ft.com

 

or your usual Financial Times representative.

 

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 

 

Monday 27 Jul 2020
FTfm Special: Responsible Investing - Burst 2
Tuesday 28 Jul 2020
Investing in Nature - Burst 1
Wednesday 29 Jul 2020
Investing in Nature - Burst 2
Thursday 30 Jul 2020
Investing in Nature - Burst 3
Thursday 30 Jul 2020
FT 300: Top Registered Investment Advisers
FT 300:
Top Registered Investment Advisers
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over July 30th, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Overview of the FT 300
A look at how the FT 300 list reflects the evolving investment management industry and what it reveals about how financial advisers operate differently compared with last year.

FT 300 Table:  Ranking of the Top FT 300 Advisers and methodology

Payment Protection Program and the US Economy 
The Payment Protection Program provides small business loans that will not have to be repaid if at least 75 per cent of the borrowed funds are used to cover payroll expenses, among other conditions. Some registered investment advisers have taken up this loan - but could such a move be harmful to advisers’ reputation and standing with clients?

Diversity and Inclusion
Even before the killing of George Floyd, several registered investment advisers had a strong focus on diversity, with some having done community work and discussing diversity with clients. But what is the sector - which previously has largely rejected requests to quantify what each firm has done to narrow race and gender-based pay gaps - doing in response to these latest racial tensions? And are their actions likely to have longer-term consequences? 

Fees 
Investment advisers have a growing focus on financial planning, tax advice and other services alongside managing clients’ assets. And how they charge clients for this work is also evolving: fewer advisers are relying solely on the traditional fee model of a percentage of the assets managed, instead charging hourly fees and creating other payment structures to reflect their expanded roles - but does this make it harder for investors to assess whether they are getting good value for money?

The RIA Office of the Future
Lockdown has forced registered investment advisers into work-from-home arrangements that many were not used to. But now there are questions about how RIA offices will look as states start reopening. How will decisions around social distancing and health and safety, and newer ways of managing the workforce, affect client relationships.

Guiding Clients Through the Pandemic
The pandemic has negatively impacted the lives of many Americans, in particular their financial security. How are advisers responding to the demands and needs of their clients - and what are the reputational risks associated with making bad calls in such unprecedented times?
 
FT 300 – Two adviser profiles


Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Dennis Asselta on +44 001 212 641 6585, email: dennis.asselta@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 
Monday 03 Aug 2020
FTfm Special: Responsible Investing - Burst 3
Friday 07 Aug 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Asia-Pacific
Thursday 20 Aug 2020
Call for Entries - FT Asia-Pacific High Growth Companies
Tuesday 01 Sep 2020
World Economy
World Economy
The Covid-19 Crisis


The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over September 01st, 2020

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Overview
The Covid-19 Crisis is reshaping the world economy in the short run and is quite likely to transform it in the longer run, too. It has come unexpectedly, a little over a decade after the worst of the global financial crisis. It has hit a world economy that was still struggling with the financial, economic and political aftermath of that crisis, in the form of feeble productivity growth, ultra-low interest rates, debt overhangs, slowing growth of world trade, protectionism and the rise of populism and nationalism. As Covid-19 has spread across the world, it has brought flight from risky assets, financial turbulence, huge central-bank interventions, shutdowns of economies, collapsed output, mass unemployment, a wave of bankruptcies, an almost-complete cessation of cross-border travel, huge increases in public spending and fiscal deficits and debt, political stresses and a sharp further deterioration in international relations, especially between China and the US. We have entered into an essentially unprecedented and dangerous new world.

Managing the Pandemic
Much depends on progress with managing the disease. So, what have learned so far about its impact, in terms of infections and fatalities? Are we likely to find a cure or a vaccine? Is it possible to keep the disease suppressed over long period or do we have to reconcile ourselves to its continued spread? How does one manage a wold economy in which some countries have suppressed the disease and others have let it spread freely? If a vaccine is found, how easy will it be to manufacture, distribute and deliver it across the globe? How will it be paid for?

Economics of Covid-19
The Covid-19 economic crisis has not affected economies uniformly. It has hit some economies far harder than others and, within societies, it hits some sectors, mostly those dependent on face-to-face interactions and the ability to travel freely, and some segments of the population, mostly the young and the less skilled, far more heavily than others. This is the natural result of “social distancing”, some of it voluntary and some of it enforced by governments. This has given rise to a lively, emotional and divisive debate on whether there exists a trade-off between preserving health and protecting the economy.  Yet what also matters is that this trade-off differs across countries, with the economic costs of a shutdown greater in poorer countries, but the health costs of the disease lower in countries with more youthful populations. 

Winning and Losing Business Sectors
Some sectors have been far worse-hit than others. So, what does Covid-19 mean for the present and future state of tourism and air travel or conventional retail? And what have been the gains for the digital economy, especially big tech and companies specialising in digital conferencing, such as Zoom. Has Covid-19 accelerated our ways of working and living by a decade? Or will we go back to the way it was before once the pandemic is over.

Future of Globalisation
Globalisation was under pressure even before the Covid-19 crisis. But the immediate impact has been a crash in world trade and movement of people. Again, outright protectionism has also been growing strongly, most prominently in the US under Donald Trump, which has launched trade wars against all its leading trade partners. Brexit has also now happened. But the ultimate trade deal has not yet been negotiated. It looks increasingly as though there will be none. But most important of all is the rising friction among China, the US and the EU and especially between China, on the one hand, and the US and EU, on the other. The future of world trade is very much at risk. 

End Game for Brexit
What will be the outcome for the post-Brexit deal with the EU. If there is no deal, what might that mean for the British economy and so the prospects for recovery from the Covid-19 crisis? Which sectors will be most adversely affected by the outcome and which might thrive?

Future of Global Finance
The Covid-19 crisis also created huge turmoil in financial markets and a pervasive flight from risk. This led to unprecedented responses by central banks, especially the Federal Reserve. But it has left a number of borrowers, especially in emerging economies, very vulnerable. What are the likely effects of this financial shock? Will there be a wave of bankruptcies and, if so, what effects might these have? Is the banking system now strong enough to cope? How are sovereign defaults being handled and how many more might emerge? Are the International Monetary Fund and other International Financial Institutions able to cope?

Fiscal Future Post-Covid-19
Far more than in the global financial crisis, central banks have not been alone this time. The scale of the fiscal response to the Covid-19 crisis has been enormous, across the world. How have the support policies been designed and which seem to be working best? In the longer term, will the fiscal and monetary policies used during the crisis inevitably lead to higher inflation? Will there be outright fiscal defaults? Or will there be a long period of financial “repression”, with limits imposed on interest rates and even exchange controls.

Crisis of the Eurozone
A big issue is the massive renewed stresses on the eurozone created by deep depressions, huge fiscal deficits and divergent mortality rates, all coming after what was a lost decade for a number of member countries, especially Italy. The European Central Bank has emerged as the key player, given the refusal to accept much in the way of fiscal solidarity. But even its ability to act is being constrained by decisions of the German Constitutional Court. So, will the eurozone survive at all and, if so, how?

Long-run Consequences of the Covid-19 Crisis
How might the world economy look five years from now? Let’s take a crystal ball to globalisation, productivity, inflation, defaults, bankruptcies, the new structure of the economy, employment, unemployment and so forth. What will be different from what it was before and what will end up more or less the same?


Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Charlotte Morgan +44 (0) 20 7775 6822, charlotte.morgan@ft.com
Petra Harkay +44 (0) 20 7775 6815, petra.harkay@ft.com
Ben Tobin +44 (0) 20 7775 6615, ben.tobin@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 
Tuesday 01 Sep 2020
Call for Entries - FT 1000: Europes Fastest-Growing Companies
Thursday 03 Sep 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Digital Lawyer 1
Friday 04 Sep 2020
FT Wealth 2020 - Sept
FT Wealth: September
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over September 04th, 2020
We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


The FT plans to publish in September an edition of FT Wealth in which a big theme will be entrepreneurs and their response to Covid. But, as usual, we intend to range far and wide in for interesting stories in the world of wealth. 

Editor’s Letter - Wealth management in a Covid world.

The Future of Luxury Residential Property in a Key East Asian Market
A look at how the coronavirus pandemic has changed demand for homes.

How wealth managers help wealthy clients cope with the emotional side of Covid-related financial losses.

Profile of a leading European entrepreneur/ investor and their views on health, healthcare and the issues arising from the pandemic.

Profile of a leading Asian female investor/ entrepreneur and her views on the role of women in business and the issues arising from the pandemic.

Art - the collectors’ views of buying art in the uncertain world of today

A column from Matthew Vincent on investment

Rhymer Rigby psychology of wealth column

Stephen Foley’s column on innovative investment

Editorial information:
Special Reports are written by FT staff journalists and a small number of selected freelance writers. They will be specialists in the field and already have regular contacts to update them. It is therefore difficult for an unsolicited submission to be so compelling that it forces its way on to a writer’s agenda. However, it does happen occasionally. We ask that all submissions be sent to ftreports@ft.com, from where they are forwarded to the appropriate writer.
Please also note that due to the volume of material received, it is not always possible to acknowledge or reply to every submission.
Recently published Surveys and FT Reports, as well as a list of forthcoming FT Reports and their synopses can be downloaded by going to www.ft.com/special-reports and clicking on the link to the Reports library.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.
Back issues of printed Survey and FT Reports can be obtained from: Historic Newspapers, Signature Online Limited, No 1 waterside Station Road, Harpenden, Herts, AL5 4US; Tel. no: 0870 165 1470; Fax no: 01582 469 248; or email: info@back-issue-newspapers.co.uk
This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Supplements and Special Reports.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

 Petra Harkay +44 (0) 20 7775 6815, petra.harkay@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 
Saturday 05 Sep 2020
Watches & Jewellery - September
Watches & Jewellery
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over September 5th, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Rise of Online Auctions
The closure of auction salesrooms during the pandemic has accelerated the growth of online sales of watches and jewellery - and it seems to be paying off for houses, with buyers seemingly happy to purchase high-cost gems online. 
 
Affordable British Watch Brand
How direct selling via the internet has led to a mushrooming of UK dial names offering good quality watches that are designed in this country but assembled abroad. 

The Need for Watch Fair
Following the cancellation of the main horological happenings of the year, we ask a range of retailers, collectors, brand bosses and industry figures whether or not the lack of such events really makes any difference.
 
Upcycling Vintage/ Antique Components
While interest in vintage and antique jewels has been steadily rising over the past few years, some are hunting down antique pieces and break them down to use their components in contemporary design.
 
Auctions for Good
Charity auctions can bring in millions for good causes. Geneva’s Only Watch event itself has raised more than Sfr50m towards muscular dystrophy research. We look at how it has been spent, what it has achieved and for how much longer will it go on. 
 
Home Objects by Jewellers
Jewellery houses have always included home objects in their collections, such as chessboard sets, jewellery boxes, clocks. Now even emerging independent jewellers have started getting in on the game.
 
The Pre-owned Watch Sector
Is it growing faster than the market for new watches? Who are the main players?
How trustworthy are internet-based pre-owned dealers?
  
My Favourite Pieces
An American jewellery designer talks us through their private watch collection.
 
Plus    News in brief from the watch and jewellery industry

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Shobnom Dasgupta +44 (0)20 7873 4114 shobnom.dasguta@ft.com

Victoria Roberts +44 (0)20 7873 3226, victoria.roberts@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 
Monday 07 Sep 2020
Europe s Start-ups

Europe’s Start-Ups

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in

digital on 08th June 2020 and in print on 11 June 2020.


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


The FT and Sifted, working with the Founders’ Forum, present a special report on Europe’s tech founders and start-ups; the people, the businesses, the landscape. (this list is provisional and may be modified)


The List: Europe’s Top 50 Founders

This list is drawn from Sifted’s existing directory of Europe’s 100 top start-ups, based on the money they have raised, how quickly they have hired and how formative they have been for the start-up ecosystem. 


This includes a lot of the most well-known names in European tech, such as N26, UIPath, Monzo, Revolut, Deliveroo, Glovo, Flixbus, Blablacar and so on. A large proportion of these are valued at more than $1bn, so these are substantial businesses making a difference in Europe’s economy.

 

From the above list, a panel of judges chooses a key founder for each of the last 15 years. A short profile puts the company and founder in the context of other things going on at the time, for example, a company founded during the financial crisis, or after Brexit, a sustainability-focused company that responded to the climate-crisis etc.  


The List: Top 50 to Follow List

We look at less well-known names: companies that have raised a Series A funding round (ie they have just raised their first serious VC backing) and which are hiring at the fastest rate, using the hiring as a proxy for growth. These are the challenger companies potentially destined to be Europe’s next set of tech unicorns, all with interesting stories behind them.

 

Introduction: Rise of European start-ups and founders, and what does the future hold


Infographics: Top Investments per sector / country / city since 2000 


Brief Analysis of Numbers

How many founders are female or from a minority background, for example. 


A timeline of the biggest moments in European Tech since 2000 


The EU tech ecosystems of the future: Estonia, Poland, Lisbon etc


Angel investors: Their place in ecosystem; why they matter

Stories informed by what the list and data tell us about the concerns and preoccupations of modern Europe - and how they are changing, with some case studies and profiles:


-         AI start-ups

Artificial intelligence has been a watchword in tech for some time. But what can the latest start-ups in the field tell us about the way AI is being applied — and what are the limits?  How are some start-ups moving beyond machine learning? 


-         Sustainability Start-ups

There are many of them but are any having much of an impact when it comes to tackling climate change


-         Health Tech in areas such as Longevity and Genomics

Are apps and start-ups filling a gap in health service provision.    


-        Europe as Birthplace of Fintech


-        Role of Regulation in opening up some opportunities and closing down others


Information


Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Nick Eyles on +44 (0)20 7873 3613, nick.eyles@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Tuesday 08 Sep 2020
Investing in Austria
Wednesday 09 Sep 2020
Future of Universities



THE FUTURE OF UNIVERSITIES


INTRODUCTION

Coronavirus has imposed short term restrictions on study and risks causing longer term economic disruption, but it has also accelerated latent underlying trends in higher and further education, and sparked fresh debate on how, what, where and when to study beyond school.


THE INTERNATIONAL STUDENT MARKET

A fast growing middle class in China, India and other emerging economies has fuelled aspirations and provided the resources for many more people to study abroad. Currently, 5m people a year are international students. Covid-19 may slow short term growth but also change the patterns with more regional and online study.


RESEARCH

Research funding is under threat with national budgets squeezed and international sources threatened in some countries, such as access by the UK to the EU’s programme after Brexit. A fall in international tuition fees threatens the cross subsidy to research it often provides. A look at how academia is responding, and whether teaching and research need to co-exist in the same university.


EMERGING UNIVERSITIES

Newer universities in Asia, Latin America and the Gulf are starting to challenge the traditional dominance of North America and Europe. A look at their evolution in serving domestic, regional and international demand for education and in partnership with more established institutions.


ONLINE/BLENDED DELIVERY

Covid-19 has accelerated a move to greater online teaching. But where mass online courses failed to take off significantly over the past decade, institutions are now exploring more effective ways to sustain student engagement and identifying more compelling ways to combine digital resources with remote tutoring alongside face-to-face learning.


LIFELONG LEARNING

As people live longer, seek to develop new skills for fast changing jobs or deepen their knowledge during leisure time and retirement, there is greater demand for shorter modules and ways to affordably and flexibly study throughout their careers and beyond.


SKILLS

A look at subject areas that have experienced rising demand - such as business studies and digital skills - and others including in the humanities and social sciences which have been criticised as too theoretical or disconnected from future careers. How are universities measuring the value of what they provide, adapting their offerings and fostering skills seen as most enriching and useful?


VOCATIONAL TRAINING

In countries including the UK, further education has long been separated from - and neglected - compared with higher education. Yet there are growing pressures in the wake of the pandemic era’sjob losses to rebalance funding and provide more integrated training that provides exposure to practical skills, apprenticeships, partnerships with employers and experiences that can boost employability.


WELFARE

Student and faculty mental health and wellbeing are an increasing focus for leaders, as they seek to build resilience for the future and create institutions better able to cope with those coming from ever more diverse social and economic backgrounds.


CASE STUDIES

An exploration of leading universities, and innovative higher and further education initiatives in different countries that offer lessons for others.


Information

■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

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Jackie King +1 917 551 5113, jackie.king@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

 

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


Wednesday 09 Sep 2020
E-Mobility 2

e-Mobility/ Smart Transportation

 

 

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in 2020

Digital on 6th July

Print on 9th September

 

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

 

1) What is e-mobility and how will it impact the way we move around in the future?

 

2) How patchy access to efficient charging stations has been seen as a roadblock to the broader uptake of electric-vehicles and how this can be countered – this could be a good explainer video

 

3) From traffic management to smart parking, how automation is impacting e-mobility/smart transport. 

 

4) Can e-mobility/smart transport become feasible in remote, rural areas? If so, what will it take? And do the benefits to society outweigh the costs?

 

5) How the migration from internal combustion engines to electric propulsion is changing transport

 

6) How can public and private e-mobility/smart transport systems be best harmonised?

 

7) How technological advances driven by Formula E can be adopted by mainstream automakers (IE: improved battery technology, weight reduction). And what impact will this have on the likes of Tesla as other car-makers move into this arena?

 

8) With sensor-based technology controlling traffic flow and helping improve transport infrastructure, how will smart cities more closely interact with smart transportation? (IE: automated traffic lights that change to allow automated emergency vehicles to get to their destination faster).

 

 

Information

 

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

 

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

 

Nick Phillips on +44 (0)20 7873 4216, nick.phillips@ft.com

Caitlin O’Sullivan +44 (0)20 7873 3743, caitlin.osullivan@ft.com

 

or your usual Financial Times representative.

 

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 

 

Wednesday 09 Sep 2020
E-Mobility Smart Transportation
Thursday 10 Sep 2020
The Future of the Workplace
Thursday 10 Sep 2020
Europe s Start-ups

Europe’s Start-Ups

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in

digital on 08th June 2020 and in print on 11 June 2020.


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


The FT and Sifted, working with the Founders’ Forum, present a special report on Europe’s tech founders and start-ups; the people, the businesses, the landscape. (this list is provisional and may be modified)


The List: Europe’s Top 50 Founders

This list is drawn from Sifted’s existing directory of Europe’s 100 top start-ups, based on the money they have raised, how quickly they have hired and how formative they have been for the start-up ecosystem. 


This includes a lot of the most well-known names in European tech, such as N26, UIPath, Monzo, Revolut, Deliveroo, Glovo, Flixbus, Blablacar and so on. A large proportion of these are valued at more than $1bn, so these are substantial businesses making a difference in Europe’s economy.

 

From the above list, a panel of judges chooses a key founder for each of the last 15 years. A short profile puts the company and founder in the context of other things going on at the time, for example, a company founded during the financial crisis, or after Brexit, a sustainability-focused company that responded to the climate-crisis etc.  


The List: Top 50 to Follow List

We look at less well-known names: companies that have raised a Series A funding round (ie they have just raised their first serious VC backing) and which are hiring at the fastest rate, using the hiring as a proxy for growth. These are the challenger companies potentially destined to be Europe’s next set of tech unicorns, all with interesting stories behind them.

 

Introduction: Rise of European start-ups and founders, and what does the future hold


Infographics: Top Investments per sector / country / city since 2000 


Brief Analysis of Numbers

How many founders are female or from a minority background, for example. 


A timeline of the biggest moments in European Tech since 2000 


The EU tech ecosystems of the future: Estonia, Poland, Lisbon etc


Angel investors: Their place in ecosystem; why they matter

Stories informed by what the list and data tell us about the concerns and preoccupations of modern Europe - and how they are changing, with some case studies and profiles:


-         AI start-ups

Artificial intelligence has been a watchword in tech for some time. But what can the latest start-ups in the field tell us about the way AI is being applied — and what are the limits?  How are some start-ups moving beyond machine learning? 


-         Sustainability Start-ups

There are many of them but are any having much of an impact when it comes to tackling climate change


-         Health Tech in areas such as Longevity and Genomics

Are apps and start-ups filling a gap in health service provision.    


-        Europe as Birthplace of Fintech


-        Role of Regulation in opening up some opportunities and closing down others


Information


Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Nick Eyles on +44 (0)20 7873 3613, nick.eyles@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Saturday 12 Sep 2020
Collecting: Art in Europe 2
Monday 14 Sep 2020
FTfm Special: ETFs 2
Tuesday 15 Sep 2020
FT Health: Cell Therapies - Part 1
FT Health: Cell Therapies
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report 31 January, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Definition: Gene therapy involves the transfer of genetic material, usually in a carrier or vector, and the uptake of the gene into the appropriate cells of the body. Cell therapy involves the transfer of cells with the relevant function into the patient.

Regulation
There are some real differences in how the industry is regulated around the world. Spotlight on Japan where deregulation five years ago has led to the country becoming a real focus of innovation with many stem-cell clinics and interest from foreign companies. US regulators on the other hand are trying to clamp down on things like DIY gene therapy.

Plus

Op-ed:  A leading industry voice talks on regulation and ethics

Science
How lab science can be turned into treatments.
Timeline of key developments since the 1940s.
Latest thinking in areas such as immunotherapy

Applications
The fight against cancer - especially in children - is the most promising potential application so far, but what other diseases could be treated?

Spotlight on China:   A flood of investment is creating a Car-T boom in China

Payment and Access
How will health systems pay for these new therapies? Will they be out of bounds for poorer countries? And how will hospitals cope? Will changes be needed in primary and secondary care? Will we need more specialist hospital wards, diagnostic units, oncologists and geneticists?

Manufacturing and Supply Chains
A look at the main players after a surge of related M&A activity this year. The made-to-order nature of cell therapies means a very different type of supply chain.

Future challenges?

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Ian Edwards +44 (0)20 7873 3272, ian.edwards@ft.com
Caitlin O’Sullivan +44 (0)20 7873 3743, caitlin.osullivan@ft.com
or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.
 
Wednesday 16 Sep 2020
Luxembourg as a Financial Centre

Luxembourg as a Financial Centre

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in 2020

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

What Brexit means for Luxembourg:
  •   In terms of relocations of financial services activities
  •   What happens to the Brits living in the Grand Duchy
  •   Other impacts on Luxembourg

What role does Luxembourg play in sustainable finance

Interview with a leading policymaker 

Interview with a business leader

What happened to the tax haven label?
How Luxembourg is adapting to the new OECD and EU tax rules

How Luxembourg is preparing the digital future of its financial industry

Luxembourg as a renminbi hub
Luxembourg’s financial services relations with China and how they compare to UK’s

An Expat Guide to Luxembourg
What it’s like to live in the Grand Duchy Luxembourg recently became the first country to make its public transport free in order to ease congestion. What else is different about life in Luxembourg?

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Stefan de Muynck +352 691 635989, stefan.de.muynck@financialtimes.lu 

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



 
Thursday 17 Sep 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Digital Lawyer 3
Monday 21 Sep 2020
Business Education: Asian Business Schools
Monday 21 Sep 2020
Business Education: Asia-Pacific Business Schools
Asia-Pacific Business Schools
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 21 September, 2020

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Asian Business Education in the Era of Covid
Asia - as the first region affected by coronavirus and strengthened by its experience with SARS - has emerged earliest from the pandemic. Its progress in adapting teaching systems and handling changing student demand provide important lessons for business schools globally. 

Chinese Business Schools
There has been a growth in the provision of business education courses and business schools within China, as cities and universities expand their training institutions and foreign universities explore ways to create campuses and joint programmes within the country. An exploration of the key trends and relative merits of different approaches.

Chinese Student Demand
A rising middle class and growing demand for global experience has turned China into a leading source of students for business schools around the world. An exploration of how rising political tensions between China and the west are affecting demand, and whether a relatively strong domestic economy reduces the appeal of foreign study for Chinese students.

Australia
Australia has a very strong international reputation among business schools, and has recruited heavily from China and India. After a significant drop in numbers linked to coronavirus, it is expanding its marketing and academic partnerships in additional countries such as Indonesia, and exploring online offerings and visa changes to help continue growth.

Singapore
Singapore remains a strategic and stable location for many leading national and international business schools, sometimes in competition with Hong Kong and mainland China. How are the institutions evolving at a time of geopolitical tensions in the region and the impact of Covid-19?

India
India sends a large number of students to universities and business schools around the world, with flows shifting as attitudes to immigration and visas change. Its own business schools contain some world-leading institutions, although attracting international students has proved difficult.

South Korea
Since the start of the millennium, a number of South Korean business schools have developed a strong international reputation, offering training to both domestic and increasingly international students interested in Asian business. 

Emerging Asia
There is growing interest by governments, students and providers alike in business education in fast growing countries including Vietnam, Philippines and Indonesia. A look at the trends, specific characteristics and their relative strengths. 

Directory
An interactive listing of the leading schools in the region by institution, country, course, fees, student numbers and other key indicators.

Editorial information:
Special Reports are written by FT staff journalists and a small number of selected freelance writers. They will be specialists in the field and already have regular contacts to update them. It is therefore difficult for an unsolicited submission to be so compelling that it forces its way on to a writer’s agenda. However, it does happen occasionally. We ask that all submissions be sent to ftreports@ft.com, from where they are forwarded to the appropriate writer.
Please also note that due to the volume of material received, it is not always possible to acknowledge or reply to every submission.
Recently published Surveys and FT Reports, as well as a list of forthcoming FT Reports and their synopses can be downloaded by going to www.ft.com/special-reports and clicking on the link to the Reports library.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.
Back issues of printed Survey and FT Reports can be obtained from: Historic Newspapers, Signature Online Limited, No 1 waterside Station Road, Harpenden, Herts, AL5 4US; Tel. no: 0870 165 1470; Fax no: 01582 469 248; or email: info@back-issue-newspapers.co.uk
This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Supplements and Special Reports.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

 Gemma Taylor +44 (0)20 7873 3698, gemma.taylor@ft.com

Rachel Spence +44 (0)20 7873 3290, rachel.spence@ft.com

Jackie King +1 917 551 5113, jackie.king@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.
 
Monday 21 Sep 2020
Investing in the Western Balkans
Investing in the
Western Balkans
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in September 2020

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional)


Companies
FT correspondents look at some of the most innovative and fast growing companies in the western Balkans.

Tech
Serbia’s population is shrinking by 37,000 people annually, with 30,000 of those emigrating abroad, mostly to the EU. But the country has a robust start up scene, and a local start-up hub Startit became the first European accelerator to be part of a Google accelerator, Startup Launchpad. The government has created a plan to invest €65m in science and technology centers and the same amount in new computers and technology for schools.

Foreign Investment
We look at the environment for foreign investors in the western Balkans

Tourism
Croatia and Slovenia, once new territory for travellers, are now considered well-discovered, and even at times, too full of tourists. But the other former Yugoslav countries and Albania have been experiencing a steady and sustainable tourism boom in the last five years. Between 2013 and 2016, nights spent by foreign visitors rose by more than 10pct each year in five Western Balkan countries: Albania, Bosnia Herzegovina, Serbia, Kosovo and Romania. There are still significant challenges -- many of the countries still face rule of law issues that could deter potential luxury investors. Furthermore, some links between countries have been left unimproved since Yugoslav times. But there are some bright spots: there are several new cross-border hiking and cycling routes.

Coal
The Balkans have not been able to quit coal. Two countries have recently announced new lines of credit to pay for new coal-fired power plants. Yet, according to the Energy community, all of the coal-fired power plants would be bankrupt by now if the countries were in the EU.Coal energy is inexpensive but the government is subsidizing it -- and pouring money that could be used on renewable sources into the power plants and into servicing the debt for new plants. (One irony is that most of the coal-fired electricity generated in the Western Balkans is exported to the EU, because it is cheaper due to the fact that the governments are not bound by EU carbon taxes.) How secure is the energy future of the countries in the Balkans? What will happen if the countries, as recommended, introduce an emissions tax? EU aspirants are asked to produce 20 percent of electricity with renewable sources by 2020 and 30 percent by 2032. Is that target achievable in the Balkans? Many of the governments have looked to small hydro as a solution -- is it feasible and at what cost to the environment?

Serbia -- Joining Russia-led Free Trade Zone, Pivoting to China
On October 25, Serbia, which aims to join the EU, is set to sign a free trade agreement with the Moscow-backed Eurasian Economic Union. The country, which was recently named as the number one recipient of greenfield investment per capita, has also received a lot of investment from China. As an EU aspirant, Serbia must align its foreign policy and investment rules to the bloc, but the transitioning country seems unready to turn away investments from China, Russia, and elsewhere that Brussels is wary of. In the past decade, Chinese companies have bought or invested in assets worth at least $318bn, making Serbia a key recipient of its Belt and Road project. The Chinese are constructing a railway from the capital Belgrade to Budapest, recently bought a large steelworks (formerly owned by US steel), a copper mine, and a power plant. Huawei is also working on surveillance projects and is making inroads in the telekom sector. How is Serbia balancing its EU aspirations with its need to develop industry that has needed significant investment since the collapse of Yugoslavia? This could also double as an interview with the president or PM. 

North Macedonia Bets on Medical Marijuana
This might be a bit unorthodox, but recently renamed North Macedonia legalised growing cannabis for medical purposes in 2016 and is now contemplating amending the law to allow its export. The health minister recently told Reuters that the country expects the marijuana industry to generate at least one per cent of GDP.

Companies Operating in Legally-complicated Kosovo
What is it like doing business in Kosovo, which fought a bitter war with Serbia in 1998-99, declared independence in 2008, but still remains unrecognised by 5 EU members, global powers like Russia and China, and of course, Serbia?



Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Supplements and Special Reports.
All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Stefan de Muynck +352 691 635989, stefan.de.muynck@financialtimes.lu 
Robert Grange +44 (0)20 7873 4418, robert.grange@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.




 
 
 
 
Tuesday 22 Sep 2020
Ghana & the New Economy
Ghana and the New Economy
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over September 22nd, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional)

The coronavirus pandemic has hit African economies hard, even as the virus itself seems to be taking a slower course than in other parts of the world. Ghana has been praised for having one of the continent's best testing strategies, and it seems to have a handle on the pandemic. But the country, once the fastest growing economy in the world, estimates that GDP growth for 2020 will fall to 1.5 per cent, on the back of its partial economic lockdown and the oil price crash, which has delayed major projects around the world.

Oil
In November 2019 1.5bn barrels of oil were discovered off the coast of Ghana, adding to the country’s existing production averaging 200,000 barrels a day. This article will address how the country is using new technology to streamline production.

Smart City
Ghana signed a MoU in 2019 for a $500m smart city project with Chinese partners and outside investment. The project aims to create a nationwide wifi network. This article will analyse the plans for Ghana’s smart cities. 

Politics
Ghana’s government has unleashed a drive for cashless services to increase efficiency and cut out corruption. The country’s high rates of mobile phone and banking use could support this shift. This article will address how blockchain is being used by the state to digitise public life, ranging from hospital records to legal documents. 

Gender
Gender equality and technology have come in pairs in Ghana and the government is pushing girls to study STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects. The UN has praised female-led start-ups in the region, while tech incubators have been awarded for their inclusion of women. 
 
Fintech
Mobile Money users shot up six-fold between 2012-2017, with 58 per cent using financial services. The high rate of mobile phone use, alongside developments including interoperability in 2018, which standardised mobile money between different networks, creates the potential for Ghana to become a regional leader in fintech, driven by start-ups.

Sustainable Energy
Several entrepreneurs in Ghana have focused on sustainable energy, including a wave energy plant. This article will investigate how new technology is being used in solar, wind and hydro power. 

Gold
Gold has long been a valuable resource for a country known during British colonial rule as the Gold Coast. This article will assess how initiatives are aiming to update the industry, for example by removing toxic mercury from the mining process, and what that means for its future. 

China
Omnipresent in Africa, China has not missed out on Ghana. It recently signed a $42.6m deal with the country to promote economic and technical cooperation with Ghana. We assess the role played by China in Ghana’s new technological developments. 

Cocoa Industry
In 2016 Ghana exported $2.27bn worth of cocoa beans. It is now being helped by new technology developments such as new space satellites, which increase traceability of the beans that are typically hidden beneath canapes. 

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Mark Carwardine: +44 (0)20 7873 4880, mark.carwardine@ft.com
Larry Kenney: +44 (0)20 7873 4835, larry.kenney@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


 
Wednesday 23 Sep 2020
Investing in Energy
Wednesday 23 Sep 2020
The Future of Cities
Thursday 24 Sep 2020
The Business of Charity
Thursday 24 Sep 2020
Sustainable Food and Agriculture 3 (Single Sponsor)
Saturday 26 Sep 2020
Collecting: Design Art
Monday 28 Sep 2020
Business Education 2020 (5) - Masters in Management
Business Education: Masters in Management

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 28 September, 2020

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):
Introduction
This could be a record year for MiM due to the coronavirus recession and students choosIng to stay on to do masters degrees, with business programmes by far the most popular subject choice. The question is whether this will also be a key year for the MiM in the US, where the degree has so far struggled against the MBA. 

Editor’s Letter
The FT’s global learning editor Andrew Jack on developments in business education. 

Rankings, Data, Analysis
What does this year’s FT ranking of masters in management courses tell us about trends in the market? Plus an explanation of the criteria for a place in the list. 

Management Column
Andrew Hill, the FT’s management editor, takes a probing look at leadership and business. 

Professor’s Column
A professor explores a current theme or recent research in business education.  

The US Market
A challenge for MiM courses in the US is that the MBA is better known and accepted by recruiters. Not having a summer internship is also an issue, but the MiM’s one-year format has appeal, enabling students to get into work more quickly than the two-year US MBA. Can the MiM supplant the MBA in the country where it was born? 

Online Education
With coronavirus forcing schools to teach more online, the FT looks at how students can avoid pitfalls and get the best from remote and blended learning. 

Sustainable Business
Sustainability is high on many students’ agendas. This piece will look at how business schools are responding and at ground-up, student-led initiatives. 

Profile
An interview with a master in management graduate about their progress since business school and becoming an entrepreneur in a field related to the global pandemic. 

Jobs
How are graduates finding employment opportunities in the post-coronavirus recession and what are schools doing to support them?

Technology: Looking at trends in technology that affect the worlds of business and work. 

Student View
First hand experiences from the current generation of masters in management students and recent graduates.

In Real Life
Interview with former masters in management student, now better known for leading change at the top of a multinational brand. 

Editorial information:
Special Reports are written by FT staff journalists and a small number of selected freelance writers. They will be specialists in the field and already have regular contacts to update them. It is therefore difficult for an unsolicited submission to be so compelling that it forces its way on to a writer’s agenda. However, it does happen occasionally. We ask that all submissions be sent to ftreports@ft.com, from where they are forwarded to the appropriate writer.
Please also note that due to the volume of material received, it is not always possible to acknowledge or reply to every submission.
Recently published Surveys and FT Reports, as well as a list of forthcoming FT Reports and their synopses can be downloaded by going to www.ft.com/special-reports and clicking on the link to the Reports library.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.
Back issues of printed Survey and FT Reports can be obtained from: Historic Newspapers, Signature Online Limited, No 1 waterside Station Road, Harpenden, Herts, AL5 4US; Tel. no: 0870 165 1470; Fax no: 01582 469 248; or email: info@back-issue-newspapers.co.uk
This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Supplements and Special Reports.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

 Gemma Taylor +44 (0)20 7873 3698, gemma.taylor@ft.com

Rachel Spence +44 (0)20 7873 3290, rachel.spence@ft.com

Jackie King +1 917 551 5113, jackie.king@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content
Wednesday 30 Sep 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Europe
Wednesday 30 Sep 2020
Cyber Security
Spclrprts
Cyber Security


The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over September 30th, 2020

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Three cyber security reports of 6 stories each
 
CYBER SECURITY (Sept 30)
1) Cyber security cuts
For more than a decade, companies have increased spending on cyber security due to threats from malware, phishing, state-sponsored cyber attacks and "deep fakes". However, experts say Covid-19 will spell an end to the spending boom. How can company and government IT and security departments do the same with less when faced with growing security threats? What technologies and procedures should they prioritise? 
 
2) Cyber Security in charts 
 
3) Cyber security and human rights 
Authoritarian regimes such as Iran and China are using cyber police units to monitor marginalised groups, prompting widespread concerns among human rights groups. What technologies are these cyber police units utilising and are their techniques set to be used on the wider population?  
 
4) Cyber security and remote working
How has the sudden shift to a remote workforce increased cybersecurity risks and what can businesses do to counter them? 
 
5) Internet domain registries
Domain registrars, the companies that manage security, authorisation and ownership of websites, are coming under pressure to ensure that the public can access appropriate information during the Covid-19 crisis, while preventing scams and misinformation. Are they succeeding? 
 
6) Healthcare
Connected devices and platforms are increasingly being used in the healthcare industry, from hospitals to drug manufacturing. But are current security measures sufficient and what implications are there should personal healthcare data fall into the wrong hands? 
 
 
 

CYBER SECURITY - AI (Oct 28)
1) Cybersecurity and deep fakes
An in-depth analysis of the deep fake landscape, and systems being designed to try and counter them
 
2) National cyber-security and AI
How governments are handling cyber attacks on critical national infrastructures and what role AI is playing there 
 
3) AI, cyber and finance
AI is working on tools to help banks with money laundering, terrorism financing, sanctioned actors, compliance 
 
4) AI and Insurance
AI and machine learning are being used by insurance groups in their underwriting process, sorting through data sets to identify higher risks. What does this mean for the sector? 
 
5) Asset Management and AI
Robo-advisers are providing automated investment advice as well as investing services and brokerage. Are these meaningful advances that will change the industry? 

6) What can we learn when AI attacks itself?  
The gap between AI/machine learning and human analysis for monitoring tasks often leads to vulnerabilities that can be exploited by criminals and malicious hackers in 'adversarial attacks'. How can these be countered? 


CYBER SECURITY - IOT (Nov 25)
1) Legal liability in IoT 
How the law is, or isn't, keeping up with liability as IoT products contain more vulnerable parts and software

2) Cybersecurity and IoT Kids' Toys
The popularity of toys, cameras and virtual assistants aimed at kids is an unsurprising development in IoT, offering promises of greater convenience for parents. But concerns remain that the proliferation of these devices may expose families to risks ranging from unwanted surveillance of their children to identity fraud. 

3) Mining sector and IoT
How is the Internet of Things impacting the mining industry, a sector that has long embraced automation and technology 

4) Digital payments and IoT
Even the countries where cash is king - such as Germany and Belgium - are turning to digital payments because of Covid. What are the new risks and opportunities? 

5) The Internet of Energy and security
Many countries are moving towards a “smart grid” for energy, using consumer technology such as smart meters and home IoT devices, connected infrastructure and data analytics to manage production and distribution of power. However, cyber security for these IoT devices and networks can be sub-par, leaving smart grid operations vulnerable. What are the concerns and risks and how can problems be mitigated? 

6) Retail and IoT
The retail sector is increasingly using AI technology by personalising the customer experience and digitisation. However, much of this relies on the collection of personal data. As the connected ecosystem expands and retailers continue to invest in connected devices to increase competitive advantage, how will it address security issues?

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

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Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content
 
Wednesday 30 Sep 2020
Global Brands
Thursday 01 Oct 2020
The Future of AI & Digital Healthcare (Single Sponsor)
Thursday 01 Oct 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Digital Lawyer 2
Thursday 01 Oct 2020
Nigeria at 60

Spclrprts


Nigeria at 60


The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over October 1st, 2020

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional


Nigeria at 60

-Intro: We take a look at Nigeria sixty years after independence, as Africa’s biggest crude producer attempts to diversify its economy away from oil production amid a global oil slump, manage a major recession and provide for its growing population of 200m.


-Economy: With the price of oil hovering right around the cost of producing a barrel in Nigeria, Africa’s largest economy is bracing for its second recession in five years with pain likely to ripple throughout the country. The government, which derives over half of its revenues and nearly all of its foreign exchange from crude oil, has already slashed its budget. More belt tightening is likely on the way - but the crisis also provides a clear opportunity for the Buhari administration to enact long-awaited structural reforms.


-Oil & Gas: We explore how the oil price crash is likely to affect IOCs, major projects and domestic players in Nigeria’s most important industries.


-Coronavirus: Medical supplies flown in from China on private planes, isolation centres built on football stadium pitches, mobile PCR testing labs delivered to remote regions. We examine the private sector response to the pandemic, which acted as a backstop to the Nigerian government.


-Interview with a prominent Nigerian businessperson.


-Governors - We speak to two governors - one from the north and one from the south - about the challenges facing their states and the opportunities they see on the horizon. 


-Banking - We assess the likely impact of the oil crash on the Nigerian banking sector, which is heavily exposed to domestic oil companies that account for roughly 30 per cent of banks’ lending.


-Manufacturing: The Buhari administration’s efforts to diversify the economy has had mixed results. The manufacturing sector in particular remains weak - we explore the challenges it faces and whether the need for domestic production revealed by coronavirus pandemic will spur a resurgence.


-Healthcare: Nigeria’s hospital system is notoriously patchy, and the country has one of the lowest per capita rates of healthcare spending in the world. The system has not so far been overwhelmed by the pandemic, but will investments being made now to cope with coronavirus create meaningful change for its future?


-Agriculture: The jewel of the Buhari administration’s economic diversification drive has borne fruit, with domestic food production rising. But the system relies heavily on government subsidies and low-cost loans, particularly from the central bank. We take a look at the Central Bank of Nigeria’s prominent, unorthodox role in the farming sector.


-Tech: Lagos has the hottest tech scene on the continent, with fintech playing a particularly prominent role. But the coronavirus pandemic is expected to dry up VC funding - how are Nigerian founders bracing for a post-Covid world?


-Op-ed from a Nigerian commentator.


Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

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Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


Saturday 03 Oct 2020
Collecting: Frieze Week
Monday 05 Oct 2020
FTfm Special: Responsible Investing
Monday 05 Oct 2020
Call for Entries - FT The Americas Fastest-Growing Companies
Monday 05 Oct 2020
Mumbai as a Financial Centre

Mumbai as a Financial Centre

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over May 1st, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Mumbai’s Future

Since the liberalisation of India’s economy in 1991, Mumbai has grown into one of the world’s predominant financial centres as global investors seek to take advantage of India’s booming economy. Yet economic growth has slowed, as has private investment, and the pulsating metropolis is creaking with population growth and climatic challenges. Foreign investors still often remain ambivalent about setting up here. Can the city continue to flourish?


Banking

Mumbai is home to India’s banking and shadow banking sector, which has over the past 18 months struggled under the weight of unpaid debts. New lending has slowed, and a number of financial institutions are at risk of collapse. The strain is reverberating through the real economy. Is the worst over, or do deeper issues remain unaddressed?


Regulation

Mumbai’s reputation as an investment hub has been damaged by financial scandals. Such episodes point to governance failings and inadequate oversight. The government has sought to give the Reserve Bank of India more power to oversee the financial system. What is being done?


New Financial Centres

Financial markets have prospered in Mumbai, with exchanges like the BSE and NSE thriving. But other financial centres are emerging in India, such as the purpose built GIFT City some 300 miles north of the city. How attractive are these new hubs to investors and businesses?


Fintech

The rise of payment start-ups and others challenging the dominance of Mumbai-based banks.


Tax Conflicts

The tax authorities an eternal source of trepidation to businesses in India. Some prominent global companies have been embroiled in painful disputes and new tax provisions continue to cause headaches for investors. Yet evasion remains rampant. The government has introduced measures to reduce tax conflicts while boosting revenue collections -- are they working?





Inequality

The capital flowing into the city over the past three decades has led to abundant spending by some, while almost half the population lives in slums. The city is considered one of the world’s most unequal. What challenges does this pose to Mumbai’s future as a global business hub?


Infrastructure

The city’s business reputation is hurt by poor infrastructure. This is being addressed, for example, by plans for a metro system and a high-speed railway, but such projects are beset by delays. What difference will they make?


Life in Mumbai (column)

A local financier or banker - from the city but who has lived in hubs like London or Hong Kong - reflects on its pluses and minuses. Work/ life balance, raising a family, culture and so on.


Interview:  Q and A with a leading Mumbai-based financier.


Interview:  Our correspondent speaks with a senior policy maker


Downtime Mumbai:  A leisure guide to the city for a visiting business person.



Information


Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Robert Grange +44 (0)20 7873 4418, robert.grange@ft.com

Srinivas Iyer +91 98 2013 2670, srinivas.iyer@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 




Tuesday 06 Oct 2020
Watches & Jewellery Asia Special
Tuesday 06 Oct 2020
Call for Entries - Europes Climate Leaders
Tuesday 06 Oct 2020
Brazil

Brazil

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on May 14th, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Introduction: Brazil under Bolsonaro

The Brazilian president in the broader Latam and global context.


Reforms - What economic reforms are on the table and why do they matter.


Brazil in the World

Once a leading advocate of multilateralism, Brazilian foreign policy has changed tack and is increasingly focused on bilateral ties with the US, China and India.


Security:  The murder rate is finally decreasing, but at what cost? Do people feel safer?


Profile

Rio is a hotbed of civic activism and social entrepreneurship and the next young and socially-engaged president of Brazil may come from here. The suave and sharp Luciano Huck, a television star in his mid-40s, is sharpening his knives to leap at the challenge of defeating far-right populism in the next presidential election.

 

Infrastructure

Interview with star infrastructure minister on the ambitious plan for PPP, concessions, privatisations.

 

Manaus Free Trade Zone

The end may be nigh for Brazil's once vaunted free trade zone in Manaus, Amazonia. The Harley Davidsons are still rolling off the production lines in the forest but critics say the site has become a den of vested interests, which alone is harming the broader Brazilian economy to the tune of half a percentage point.


Mercosur

The future of Mercosur now that its two biggest members are on the far ends of the ideological spectrum.


Brazil’s Credit Revolution

Brazil is on the threshold of a new and unfamiliar world: one of low inflation and low interest rates, with implications reaching into every corner of the economy.


Ethanol

Scene from Ribeirão Preto on the booming ethanol industry that is now being exported to India.



Roundtable

The future of Brazil’s oil and gas industry. Sidebar on Brazil key gas contract with Bolivia

 

Op -ed - The state of the Brazilian economy

Information


Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


John Moncure +1 917 551 5036, john.moncure@ft.com

 

Brazil - Alessandre Siano +55 11 992 912 814, alessandre.siano@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

Wednesday 07 Oct 2020
REC: Women in Business

 Women in Business
The Financial Times proposes to publish this global FT Report on 7th October 2020
 
We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

As the coronavirus pandemic upends the workplace, we look at the effect on women’s equality at work in their pay, career development and beyond. The Women in Business report looks at the best practice of organisations around the world that want to make it ordinary for women to succeed in their working lives - especially in extraordinary times.

It will be published in the UK and international editions on October 7, the day of the FT’s Women at the Top conference.

Flexible Working
After businesses were forced by the pandemic to make a swift switch from cautious experiment to full-on remote working, what have we learnt about what works well, and what needs fixing?

Money
Pay: UK companies’ pay gap reporting in the spring was patchy, as the government relaxed requirements at the onset of Covid-19. Which companies stuck to the schedule - and what benefits did they see from doing so? 
Plus: Fundraising for founders: How to pitch in a downturn.  

Career Development
Many will lose their current job and start out in new organisations and new careers. We look at the numbers, and the stories behind the numbers.
Plus: how to make the leap. 

‘How do I ….?’ 
Practical pointers for working life, from building resilience to being a better manager.

Home FrontA look at the intersection of working and personal life

Profile/ Interview
We interview a woman with insights and experience in business: topics to include dealing with success and failure, and how to survive both

Opinion ColumnThe big questions for women in business post-coronavirus 

Entrepreneurship
Profile of a woman or group of women who have made a mark in their own ventures, including in a downturn.   Plus:   Support networks for female founders


Generation Learning
Two generations of working women in conversation: from coping with a downturn to reflecting on what has changed and what remains to change.

Country Focus
We look at one country’s approach to gender diversity to find out what works, and why. 

‘Women in Leadership’ Essay Contest to Win a Free EMBA at Henley Business School
The annual essay competition this year addresses the question: "How can organisations help women succeed by involving more men in their efforts? What strategies and actions are most helpful and least helpful?"


Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 
All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Carol Ramsey +44 (0) 20 7873 4024, carol.ramsey@ft.com

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Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.
 

Thursday 08 Oct 2020
Future of Logistics
Friday 09 Oct 2020
FT Wealth 2020 - Family Office
Friday 09 Oct 2020
Oil & Gas 4.0
Saturday 10 Oct 2020
Collecting: Paris Art Scene
Wednesday 14 Oct 2020
Investing in Greece

Investing in Greece

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over October 14th, 2020

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Politics

After three international bailouts and a turbulent period of left-wing rule, Greece aims for a sustained recovery under the centre-right prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis, a US-trained former consultant. His pro-business government is committed to completing further reforms under EU supervision following a solid election win last July over the radical Syriza party. But how will Greece catch up after a “lost decade” that saw output fall by one-quarter and massive emigration by skilled younger workers?


Economy

Business confidence has returned to pre-bailout levels since the Mitsotakis government took office. The economy is set to expand by around 2.5 per cent this year, while the jobless rate is slowly declining. But foreign investment is lagging and Greek banks are struggling to reduce their non-performing loans. Can Greece overcome the challenges left by the crisis and succeed in accelerating growth?

Interview: With a senior politician or business figure   


Privatisation

State-controlled energy companies, from gas-trading to electricity distribution, are being offered for sale, alongside a minority stake in the Athens international airport. Disposals of regional ports and yacht marinas are also underway. This article examines how the centre-right government is rebooting Greece’s privatisation programme with the aim of attracting big-name international investors.


Renewable Energy 

A decision by the Mitsotakis government to shut down Greece’s coal-fired power plants by 2024 has opened the way for rapid growth of renewables. Current solar and wind capacity would have to be tripled to replace electricity output from coal-fired plants. But bureaucratic obstacles and increasing popular opposition to installing giant wind turbines on Aegean islands raise doubts about whether Greece will be able to meet its revised targets for renewable energy production.   


Tourism

Tourism became more important to the economy during Greece’s recession: it now accounts for one-quarter of national output compared with one-fifth before the crisis. But the overwhelming majority of visitors still arrive between May and September. Can the season be extended by promoting niche tourism, such as hiking and wellness retreats, in the spring and autumn months?


Olive oil

It is considered Greece’s signature product, yet much of the country’s high-quality olive oil is sold cheaply and shipped in bulk to Italy or Spain for mixing with local brands. But in some Greek regions, interest in producing bottled olive oil revived during the crisis. This article examines how a new generation of farm-to-delicatessen Greek growers are selling their own brands of premium olive oil in European and US markets  


Education

Under a new policy to modernise the country’s universities, Greece is offering courses in classics and ancient history designed to attract foreign students. Chinese students are already enrolling at Athens university for a four-year undergraduate course taught in English, while US students are expected to sign up for graduate programmes. This piece will consider Greece’s prospects for becoming a global education hub for classical studies.   


Company Profiles

These will be short profiles of companies that flourished during Greece’s recession after deciding to focus on exports.


National Anniversary

Modern Greece marks its 200th birthday in 2021. This article looks ahead to celebrations and a national debate over how an impoverished Ottoman province won independence with the help of European powers, doubled its territory in successive conflicts with Turkey and eventually secured its place in western Europe as a member of NATO and the EU.


Information

■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library

Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 


For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

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Chris Christodoulou +357 2281 8884, chris.c@actiongroup.com

Robert Grange +44 (0)20 7873 4418, robert.grange@ft.com

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Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

Thursday 15 Oct 2020
African Banking & Finance
African Banking & Finance
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over 15 October 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

North Africa
We survey outlook for Moroccan banking and finance in the wake of the pandemic. The economy is expected to contract and Fitch has downgraded the outlook for three banks. 

West Africa
Banks across west Africa are heavily exposed to the oil sector - what does that mean amid plunging oil prices and depreciation?

Fintech Hub
The continent's biggest tech scene is in Lagos, and Nigerian fintech companies are the hottest ticket, attracting hundreds of millions of dollars last year. This piece explores the biggest companies and what makes the sector so attractive.

Interview with a west African banking regulator

We talk to a leading South African banker on post-Covid recovery plans in South Africa and the African continent

Profile of a first digital bank that is growing rapidly but is wary of lending in the post-Covid economy.

The failure of global private equity funds in Africa
Many investments have quietly died after they made a big noise about entering the continent.

Profile of an African development lender 

Sustainability Agenda:   How is it faring in African banking?

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Mark Carwardine: +44 (0)20 7873 4880, mark.carwardine@ft.com
Larry Kenney: +44 (0)20 7873 4835, larry.kenney@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 
Friday 16 Oct 2020
Arab World: Banking & Finance
Thursday 22 Oct 2020
FT 401: Top Retirement Advisers
Friday 23 Oct 2020
FT Health: Cell Therapies - Part 2
Monday 26 Oct 2020
Risk Management: Exchanges, Trading & Clearing
Monday 26 Oct 2020
Business Education 2020 (6) - EMBA
Wednesday 28 Oct 2020
Cyber Security: Ai & Data

Cyber Security



The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over September 30th, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Three cyber security reports of 6 stories each

 

CYBER SECURITY (Sept 30)

1) Cyber security cuts

For more than a decade, companies have increased spending on cyber security due to threats from malware, phishing, state-sponsored cyber attacks and "deep fakes". However, experts say Covid-19 will spell an end to the spending boom. How can company and government IT and security departments do the same with less when faced with growing security threats? What technologies and procedures should they prioritise? 

 

2) Cyber Security in charts 

 

3) Cyber security and human rights 

Authoritarian regimes such as Iran and China are using cyber police units to monitor marginalised groups, prompting widespread concerns among human rights groups. What technologies are these cyber police units utilising and are their techniques set to be used on the wider population?  

 

4) Cyber security and remote working

How has the sudden shift to a remote workforce increased cybersecurity risks and what can businesses do to counter them? 

 

5) Internet domain registries

Domain registrars, the companies that manage security, authorisation and ownership of websites, are coming under pressure to ensure that the public can access appropriate information during the Covid-19 crisis, while preventing scams and misinformation. Are they succeeding? 

 

6) Healthcare

Connected devices and platforms are increasingly being used in the healthcare industry, from hospitals to drug manufacturing. But are current security measures sufficient and what implications are there should personal healthcare data fall into the wrong hands? 

 

 

 


CYBER SECURITY - AI (Oct 28)

1) Cybersecurity and deep fakes

An in-depth analysis of the deep fake landscape, and systems being designed to try and counter them

 

2) National cyber-security and AI

How governments are handling cyber attacks on critical national infrastructures and what role AI is playing there 

 

3) AI, cyber and finance

AI is working on tools to help banks with money laundering, terrorism financing, sanctioned actors, compliance 

 

4) AI and Insurance

AI and machine learning are being used by insurance groups in their underwriting process, sorting through data sets to identify higher risks. What does this mean for the sector? 

 

5) Asset Management and AI

Robo-advisers are providing automated investment advice as well as investing services and brokerage. Are these meaningful advances that will change the industry? 


6) What can we learn when AI attacks itself?  

The gap between AI/machine learning and human analysis for monitoring tasks often leads to vulnerabilities that can be exploited by criminals and malicious hackers in 'adversarial attacks'. How can these be countered? 



CYBER SECURITY - IOT (Nov 25)

1) Legal liability in IoT 

How the law is, or isn't, keeping up with liability as IoT products contain more vulnerable parts and software


2) Cybersecurity and IoT Kids' Toys

The popularity of toys, cameras and virtual assistants aimed at kids is an unsurprising development in IoT, offering promises of greater convenience for parents. But concerns remain that the proliferation of these devices may expose families to risks ranging from unwanted surveillance of their children to identity fraud. 


3) Mining sector and IoT

How is the Internet of Things impacting the mining industry, a sector that has long embraced automation and technology 


4) Digital payments and IoT

Even the countries where cash is king - such as Germany and Belgium - are turning to digital payments because of Covid. What are the new risks and opportunities? 


5) The Internet of Energy and security

Many countries are moving towards a “smart grid” for energy, using consumer technology such as smart meters and home IoT devices, connected infrastructure and data analytics to manage production and distribution of power. However, cyber security for these IoT devices and networks can be sub-par, leaving smart grid operations vulnerable. What are the concerns and risks and how can problems be mitigated? 


6) Retail and IoT

The retail sector is increasingly using AI technology by personalising the customer experience and digitisation. However, much of this relies on the collection of personal data. As the connected ecosystem expands and retailers continue to invest in connected devices to increase competitive advantage, how will it address security issues?


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Francesca Dunnett on +44 (0)20 7873 3000, francesca.dunnett@ft.com or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content

Wednesday 28 Oct 2020
Investing in Mauritius
Saturday 31 Oct 2020
Collecting: Autumn
Monday 02 Nov 2020
Assessing the SDG s / Global Goals
Monday 02 Nov 2020
FTfm Special:Smart Beta
Wednesday 04 Nov 2020
Risk Management: Property

Risk Management: Property

 

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over November 04, 2020

 

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional): 

 

Climate Change

Wildfires in Australia and California have exposed the toll climate change is taking on buildings in parts of the world exposed to extreme weather. Real estate markets are suffering and insurers are backing out of fire-prone areas. We look at the growing risks to global real estate markets from extreme weather events linked to climate change, and what the property industry itself should be doing to mitigate damage and reduce its own climate impact. 

 

Retail Property

Retail real estate is now in a steep slump in both the UK and US: values fell 12 per cent in the UK in 2019 (CBRE) and US malls dropped 11 per cent (Green Street Advisors). Is the decline set to infect European and Asian retail property too -- and how far does the downturn have left to run? Investors have begun buying UK shopping centres again, albeit at heavily discounted prices -- is this a sign of hope or are they catching a falling knife?

 

Real Estate Debt Funds (US-focused)

As banks retreated from risky real estate lending after the financial crisis, real estate debt funds mushroomed to fill the gap. But while some are run by experienced veterans, industry players say others are taking on excessive risk. What happens when loans turn sour as the property cycle turns? 

 

Brexit

With the government aiming to finalise the UK's trade arrangements with the EU by the end of this year, what are the potential implications for property markets if the UK experiences a "cliff edge" at year-end -- and how far is the prospect holding back real estate markets in the UK this year? 

 

Silicon Valley/ High Urban House Prices

Some big tech companies are to fork out vast sums to help address the housing affordability crisis in California they helped create by drawing in highly paid tech workers. Why have the tech giants finally decided this is a concern for them, and what are the risks if steep housing inequality continues?

 

Interview on Global Fire Safety

The Grenfell Tower disaster three years ago exposed fire safety failures in the UK which building experts say are also a concern in other countries. This prompted the launch of the International Fire Safety Standards (IFSS) Coalition in 2018. Why is the group needed and what are its top priorities? 

 

Money Laundering

The UK and US are among the advanced economies that have introduced new rules to prevent the flow of dirty cash into real estate, but campaigners say a far tougher approach is needed. With the UK government starting to seize properties and fine estate agents and other professionals who fail to take full anti-money-laundering measures, what more should the industry be doing to ensure it does not fall foul of illicit money flows?

India

Indian cities are studded with unfinished developments after a downturn and funding squeeze put paid to ambitious development projects. What went wrong -- and can a new scheme from the State Bank of India to finance builders and homebuyers unclog the market?

 

Shared Offices

After WeWork's near-collapse last summer, and the failures or acquisitions of several smaller providers, landlords are looking again at shared office operators and their business models. How risky is the model for property owners, and has its period of growth ended?

 

Hong Kong

The fortunes of some of Hong Kong’s richest men are built on property, while the territory’s residential prices are among the world’s most expensive. But political tensions and protests in the territory have cut into market values. Is this a buying opportunity -- or is investment in Hong Kong property fraught with risk?

 

Landmarks

As buildings from the mid to late 20th century become overdue for refurbishment, some are in danger of demolition. What are the neglected (UK or overseas) 20th century landmarks that deserve preservation?

 

Information

 

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

 

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

 

Ben Tobin +44 (0) 20 7775 6615, ben.tobin@ft.com

 

or your usual Financial Times representative.

 

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 

Friday 06 Nov 2020
Watches & Jewellery (November)
Friday 06 Nov 2020
FT Health: Communicable Disease
Saturday 07 Nov 2020
Art and Culture in the Gulf
Arts and Culture in the Gulf
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in 07 November, 2020.


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Overview: 

Support for Entrepreneurs
There have been a raft of initiatives in place across the likes of the UAE and Saudi Arabia supporting entrepreneurs across the art and culture sectors, what are these initiatives and how are they rolling out across the region in the wake of the Covid-19 lockdowns? 

Art
What are the prospects for the new Modern Art Museum in Saudi Arabia and new Museums like the Louvre in Abu Dhabi faring in the aftermath of the pandemic?

Film & Theatre
How are the new Art House Cinemas faring in Dubai and what are the plans for the region with the current COVID19 pandemic

Saudi & UAE
Both Saudi and UAE are continuing to push on with its support for Art, Culture and Tourism initiatives in 2020 and into 2021 despite the current economy. Which initiatives are continuing to receive funding and looking to be completed in the near future and what does the future hold for them. 

Culture
Cultural sites are at the epicentre of much of the tourism offerings, especially in Saudi Arabia and Emirates like Ras Al Khaimah. How are these fairing and how are these locations approaching the preservation of these cultural sites to also ensure that they are sustainable.

Education
The arts have received considerably more funding over the past few years, which institutions are thriving across the region and attracting students both regionally and internally.

Interview:  We talk to a regional policymaker or arts leader.

Review:  We review a recent regional film or TV drama

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Luke McGreevy: +971 5087 63027, luke.mcgreevy@ft.com
Mark Carwardine: +44 (0)20 7873 4880, mark.carwardine@ft.com
Larry Kenney: +44 (0)20 7873 4835, larry.kenney@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


 
Monday 09 Nov 2020
Managing Climate Change
Monday 09 Nov 2020
The UKs Entrepreneurs
Tuesday 10 Nov 2020
Investing in Kuwait
Wednesday 11 Nov 2020
Energy Efficiency
Thursday 12 Nov 2020
The COP 26: Guide & Workshop
Wednesday 18 Nov 2020
REC: Diversity Leaders

Diversity Leaders
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 18 November 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Diversity and inclusion have acquired even more importance in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. In the US, some leading companies have responded to protests against police killings of African-Americans by promising to redouble efforts to promote a more diverse workforce, while others stand accused of focusing on women and ethnic minorities in initial waves of job cuts. The disproportionately high incidence of Bame (Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic) victims of coronavirus has turned the spotlight on health inequalities while some of the most successful leaders in the fightback against Covid-19 have hailed from diverse backgrounds whether female political leaders or non-white executives and health professionals.

In this landmark special report, the Financial Times will publish its second annual Diversity Leaders list, compiled with research partner Statista. It will show the extent to which listed and privately held companies in 16 European countries have achieved a diverse and inclusive workforce, based on what their employees, the public, and peers think.

Articles in this special report will include:  

Introduction
We introduce the list and its methodology, as well as the overall trends it reveals against the backdrop of a global pandemic and lockdown, which have led to the accelerated use of technology, unprecedented economic shrinkage, severe budget cuts and a wholesale reconfiguration of workplaces. 

The List
To be eligible, businesses must employ at least 250 people and be based in one of the following countries, expanding the inaugural 2019 list of 10 countries: Austria; Belgium; Denmark (new); Finland (new); France; Germany; Ireland (new); Italy; Luxembourg; the Netherlands; Norway (new); Poland (new); Spain (new); Sweden; Switzerland and the UK. The list assesses companies’ success in promoting all types of diversity, from gender balance and sexual orientation, to an ethnic and social mix that reflects wider society.

Case Studies of some of the companies/sectors featured in the list.

Focus on a laggard and a leader among countries when it comes to policymaking and measuring diversity and inclusion.

Opinion Piece
A policymaker or business leader gives a powerful personal view on a topical theme.

Progress Report
We revisit some of the companies in the 2019 list to find out how they have fared in the pandemic era and whether their D&I work has progressed, stalled or gone backwards.

Employee Networks and Grassroots Organisations
We hear from a selection of employees and grassroots activists on the role they play in effecting bottom-up change 

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Carol Ramsey +44 (0) 20 7873 4024, carol.ramsey@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.
 

 

Wednesday 18 Nov 2020
Investing in Senegal
Thursday 19 Nov 2020
Sustainable Food and Agriculture 4 (Single Sponsor)
Friday 20 Nov 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Intelligent Business
Friday 20 Nov 2020
Technology: Latin America

Technology: Latin America

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on May 01st, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Introduction

Latam tech is coming of age. After a slow start, the arrival last year of major investors such as Japan's Softbank and Chinese players such as Tencent have brought a flood of new money. Investment in 2019 totalled around $5bn and the number of venture capital firms active in the region is growing fast. 

 

Interview with leading tech fund investor in the region


Tech for Good

While Brazil is not likely to create a new social network or score a moonshot, there is a great deal of space for technology to improve people's lives in a country with huge social needs, whether in terms of tech-enabled education programmes to improve literacy, healthcare programmes to lower the cost of care or group buying to reduce the price of basic goods. 


Incumbents Play Catch-up

Brazil's old guard companies embrace tech. Some of the country's biggest companies - banks Itaú and Bradesco and beverage giant Ambev - are offering "fast tracks" to start-ups to supply innovations. The companies know they can't attract the talent that start-ups do, so their thinking is this "fast track" is a way to obtain cutting edge tech. 


Mexico Tech

Why does Mexico, Latin America's second biggest economy, not have a single unicorn? Part of the answer relates to President Andrés Manuel López Obrador and his tech problem. López Obrador's vision for the economy is one fired by fossil fuels and powered by state-led development. Tech is not a word often heard in the government's vocabulary. 


Colombia Tech

Despite President Duque's enthusiastic rhetoric promoting what he likes to call the "Orange Economy", tech companies in Colombia have had mixed fortunes. Uber's experience is a sobering lesson: following a battle over regulation, Uber exited the country earlier this month amid acrimony. 


Medellin

Better known as the hometown of one of the world's most notorious drug traffickers, Colombia's second city is re-inventing itself as a tech hub. Chosen as the only city in Latin America to host one of the Centres for the 4th Industrial Revolution, Medellin is now working on cutting-edge blockchain and AI projects. 


Montevideo

Tiny Uruguay has become an unlikely software star. Supportive government policies, a well-educated population, low costs and good internet access mean the country of 3.5m now exports software to more than 52 nations. 

 

Buenos Aires

Argentina has been the premier origin of Latin America's unicorns, with retailing giants such as Mercado Libre (Latam's Amazon). But will the new Peronist government promote the knowledge economy or will their protectionist and statist bent undermine all that? 


Chile

A look at Start-up Chile, a public start-up accelerator created by the Chilean Government for high-potential entrepreneurs. Today, Start-Up Chile is the leading accelerator in Latin America and among the top 10 globally. 


Company Profiles


Brazil Fintech

Known for its high costs and bureaucracy Brazil’s economy remains dominated by five big, traditional banks. The flipside is that this is making it an increasingly attractive target for agile technology start-ups.


Information


Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


John Moncure +1 917 551 5036, john.moncure@ft.com

 

Brazil

Alessandre Siano +55 11 992 912 814, alessandre.siano@ft.com


Argentina, Chile, Uruguay & Paraguay

Gonzalo Rio +54 9 11 5497 6679, gonzalo.rio@ft.com or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content

Tuesday 24 Nov 2020
The Future of Motorsport
Wednesday 25 Nov 2020
Cyber Security: Internet of Things

Cyber Security



The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over September 30th, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Three cyber security reports of 6 stories each

 

CYBER SECURITY (Sept 30)

1) Cyber security cuts

For more than a decade, companies have increased spending on cyber security due to threats from malware, phishing, state-sponsored cyber attacks and "deep fakes". However, experts say Covid-19 will spell an end to the spending boom. How can company and government IT and security departments do the same with less when faced with growing security threats? What technologies and procedures should they prioritise? 

 

2) Cyber Security in charts 

 

3) Cyber security and human rights 

Authoritarian regimes such as Iran and China are using cyber police units to monitor marginalised groups, prompting widespread concerns among human rights groups. What technologies are these cyber police units utilising and are their techniques set to be used on the wider population?  

 

4) Cyber security and remote working

How has the sudden shift to a remote workforce increased cybersecurity risks and what can businesses do to counter them? 

 

5) Internet domain registries

Domain registrars, the companies that manage security, authorisation and ownership of websites, are coming under pressure to ensure that the public can access appropriate information during the Covid-19 crisis, while preventing scams and misinformation. Are they succeeding? 

 

6) Healthcare

Connected devices and platforms are increasingly being used in the healthcare industry, from hospitals to drug manufacturing. But are current security measures sufficient and what implications are there should personal healthcare data fall into the wrong hands? 

 

 

 


CYBER SECURITY - AI (Oct 28)

1) Cybersecurity and deep fakes

An in-depth analysis of the deep fake landscape, and systems being designed to try and counter them

 

2) National cyber-security and AI

How governments are handling cyber attacks on critical national infrastructures and what role AI is playing there 

 

3) AI, cyber and finance

AI is working on tools to help banks with money laundering, terrorism financing, sanctioned actors, compliance 

 

4) AI and Insurance

AI and machine learning are being used by insurance groups in their underwriting process, sorting through data sets to identify higher risks. What does this mean for the sector? 

 

5) Asset Management and AI

Robo-advisers are providing automated investment advice as well as investing services and brokerage. Are these meaningful advances that will change the industry? 


6) What can we learn when AI attacks itself?  

The gap between AI/machine learning and human analysis for monitoring tasks often leads to vulnerabilities that can be exploited by criminals and malicious hackers in 'adversarial attacks'. How can these be countered? 



CYBER SECURITY - IOT (Nov 25)

1) Legal liability in IoT 

How the law is, or isn't, keeping up with liability as IoT products contain more vulnerable parts and software


2) Cybersecurity and IoT Kids' Toys

The popularity of toys, cameras and virtual assistants aimed at kids is an unsurprising development in IoT, offering promises of greater convenience for parents. But concerns remain that the proliferation of these devices may expose families to risks ranging from unwanted surveillance of their children to identity fraud. 


3) Mining sector and IoT

How is the Internet of Things impacting the mining industry, a sector that has long embraced automation and technology 


4) Digital payments and IoT

Even the countries where cash is king - such as Germany and Belgium - are turning to digital payments because of Covid. What are the new risks and opportunities? 


5) The Internet of Energy and security

Many countries are moving towards a “smart grid” for energy, using consumer technology such as smart meters and home IoT devices, connected infrastructure and data analytics to manage production and distribution of power. However, cyber security for these IoT devices and networks can be sub-par, leaving smart grid operations vulnerable. What are the concerns and risks and how can problems be mitigated? 


6) Retail and IoT

The retail sector is increasingly using AI technology by personalising the customer experience and digitisation. However, much of this relies on the collection of personal data. As the connected ecosystem expands and retailers continue to invest in connected devices to increase competitive advantage, how will it address security issues?


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Francesca Dunnett on +44 (0)20 7873 3000, francesca.dunnett@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content

Saturday 28 Nov 2020
Collecting: Art in The Americas
Saturday 28 Nov 2020
The Business of Formula One
Tuesday 01 Dec 2020
Investing in Uganda

Investing in Uganda

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over June 25th, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Introduction

Uganda has been growing at a moderately fast pace for several years, overcoming instability on its northern border with South Sudan and establishing itself as a stable ally of the US in the region. It has been a generous recipient of refugees from that conflict. Elections are due in 2021 when Yoweri Museveni’s long mandate will be tested again. The country’s economic prospects could be significantly altered by the oil industry, though there have been delays in bringing production on-stream. 


Oil

The discovery of large oil reserves - estimated at six billion barrels - in western Uganda in 2006 spurred high expectations of economic transformation. But crude production has been repeatedly delayed over the years by spats over taxes and a lack of infrastructure. We assess the state of play and outlook for the industry.


Fintech

Uganda's fintech industry is becoming one of the most vibrant in east Africa, accelerating financial inclusion. In a country where only 11 per cent of the population is banked by traditional institutions, over 24m mobile money accounts were registered in recent years, covering more than half the population. We look at the startups powering the sector’s growth.


Coffee

Uganda boasts some of the best coffee in the world but has been slower to brand its beans than some other countries, including Ethiopia and neighbouring Rwanda. This piece will look at attempts to extract more value from coffee by increasing premiums and moving up the value chain. 


Trade

A big chunk of Ugandan exports go to the East African Community - arguably one of the most successful of Africa’s trade blocs. But tensions with member Rwanda -  a long-running rivalry that led to conflict in the past and closed their busiest border crossing for the past year - continues to take a toll on the Ugandan economy. Ugandans are putting hopes on the new African Continental Free Trade Area that will come into force in July and aims to bring together 55 countries. 


Airlines

Uganda Airlines, founded by Idi Amin, is airborne again after almost two decades out of the skies. It wants to take a slice of the East African aviation industry that is dominated by Ethiopian Airlines. But the state-run airline is flying into an increasingly crowded aviation market - Tanzania is also resurrecting its airline, while Rwanda is expanding its own - in a continent where carriers have the weakest finances and emptiest planes of any region in the world. 


Politics

This piece will look at what is likely to be a hard-fought election campaign as challengers, including Bobi Wine and opposition stalwart Kizza Besigye seek to end Yoweri Museveni’s more than 30 years in power. After court interventions into elections in both Kenya and Malawi, the 2021 elections will be closely watched both in the region and internationally. 


China

China has now completed a digital television project that will see more than 500 villages across Uganda access digital television. Access to Satellite TV for 10,000 African Villages is among the largest such programmes supported by Beijing. This piece will look at China’s growing influence in Uganda, both in the economic and soft-power spheres.  


Gold

Gold production reached a record high in 2016, but has since slipped back. This article will look at the ups and downs of the country’s second-largest export.


Tourism: Gorillas back in the mist

Amid growing concern over the prospects for wildlife worldwide, the population of mountain gorillas in Uganda is growing a new census shows. More than three decades of “extreme conservation” - including day-to-day protection of gorillas - coupled with collaboration between governments, conservation organizations is having a positive impact.  


Fashion

For years, Uganda has been pushing through "Buy Uganda Build Uganda" - a policy aimed at fostering domestic manufacturing and consumption in certain sectors. Now, in a country where imported hand-me-down trousers and second-hand dresses from the US fuel the local garment industry, an increasing number of locals want "Made in Uganda" apparel. This is underpinning a rising craze for fashion designed and made in the cotton-producing country. 


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com. This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Mark Carwardine: +44 (0)20 7873 4880, mark.carwardine@ft.com

Larry Kenney: +44 (0)20 7873 4835, larry.kenney@ft.com or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


Thursday 03 Dec 2020
Chile 2020
Investing in Chile
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over in 13 November 2019


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Politics
Since the end of Pinochet’s military dictatorship 30 years ago, Chile has been one of the most stable democracies in the region. But the return to power in 2018 of Sebastián Piñera, after he became Chile’s first rightwing president to be elected in half a century in his first 2010-14 term, has seen him struggle to implement his business-friendly reform programme. What can be expected of Piñera’s second term?
 
Economy
Chile has long been held up as the example to follow by other Latin American countries after the unprecedented economic growth of the past 40 years that saw it become one of the richest nations  in the region, having been one of the poorest – a phenomenon known as the “Chilean Miracle”. But in recent years Chile’s economic performance has been disappointing. Can Chile ever escape the middle-income trap and become Latin America’s first developed nation?
 
Interview with a senior politician or business figure
 
Trade & Investment
As one of the region’s most open, stable and prosperous economies, Chile is regarded as a safe investment destination and a reliable trading partner, with more free trade agreements than any other country in the world. How can Chile harness organisations such as APEC to boost its trading prowess and enhance its standing with investors? Or the Pacific Alliance closer to home, and the rival Mercosur group?
 
Copper
As the world’s leading copper producer, the red metal has been the linchpin of Chile’s economy for decades, accounting for almost half of its exports. While this has helped to drive growth, it also leaves Chile exposed to price fluctuations and demand from China, while ageing mines and falling ore grades are requiring heavy investment. What is the future of Chile’s copper sector?
 
Lithium
Chile dominated the world lithium markets for decades, with some of the largest and highest-quality proven reserves. But despite soaring demand for use in mobile phones and electric cars, Chile’s production has flattened thanks to strict regulations, and the country is in danger of falling behind competitors like Australia. Can Chile’s lithium sector overcome its challenges, and even build batteries locally?
 
Tourism
A more than 2,600-mile-long strip of land wedged between the spine of the Andes and the Pacific Ocean, Chile is a country that is blessed with some of the most striking and diverse landscapes in the continent – from the Atacama desert in the north, to the lakes, forests and glaciers of its Patagonian south. This article examines how Chile is making the most of its tourism resources.
 
Company Profile
This piece looks at a company that is playing a leading role in the diversification of Chile’s economy away from its dependence on copper mining, so reducing the effects of “Dutch disease” associated with an over-reliance on natural resources.
 
Disaster Management
Earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes, floods, fires – Chile suffers them all. But as a member of the Pacific “Ring of Fire” countries, Chile has won a reputation as the example to follow when it comes to disaster management, thanks to rigorous building codes, evacuation simulations and preparation, which allowed it to escape a 2015 earthquake that measured 8.4 on the Richter scale virtually unscathed.
 
Renewable Energy
Until recently, Chile was a major energy importer. But in the last few years, a revolution in its renewable energy sector has greatly reduced its reliance on imports. What challenges does Chile face to becoming energy self-sufficient and how feasible is its goal to produce all energy from renewable sources by 2040?

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

John Moncure: +1 917 551 5036, john.moncure@ft.com

Gonzalo Rio +54 9 11 5497 6679, gonzalo.rio@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


 
Friday 04 Dec 2020
FT Wealth 2020 - Dec
Saturday 05 Dec 2020
Style: Christmas Gift Guide
Monday 07 Dec 2020
Business Education 2020 (7) - EU Business School
Monday 07 Dec 2020
FTfm Special: Fixed Income

FTfm Special Report: Fixed Income

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on November 2nd, 2020.


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


  1. Asian fixed income markets have historically been under-represented in portfolios run by global investors. Why is this and is it likely to change? What are the attractions and drawbacks of Asian fixed income for global investors.  
  2. Fixed income ETFs Asian fixed income forms a relatively small component of the ETF industry’s total assets. Can passive strategies work in Asia fixed income or is this an asset class that is better suited to active management. What kinds of ETFs are available to investors that do want to pursue a passive approach in Asia fixed income markets. 
  3. China growth China is already the second biggest corporate bond market in the world – but its remarkable growth over the past decade has thrown up problems, including concerns over credit quality and the role of rating agencies.
  4. Hong Kong has already had to grapple with protests and the coronavirus in 2020. Now the revocation of the financial centre’s special trading status with the US as well as new security regulations from China is forcing international fund managers to take a hard look at their local operations.
  5. US companies like Amazon have secured some of the lowest borrowing costs ever secured in the US corporate bond market. Investors have been clamouring to lend to blue-chip companies since the Federal Reserve provided a backstop to markets in March, which included a promise to buy corporate bonds. The intervention helped to bring down corporate borrowing costs, which had spiralled to a 10-year high during the coronavirus-induced sell-off in March. Corporate bond issuance has passed $1tn this year; a record pace
  6. Australia fixed-income funds The Australian government in May said it would ban fund managers from paying sales commissions to advisers/brokers to push their investment products on the grounds that they created conflicts of interest. The ban will usher in huge changes to Australian fixed income funds. 

Comment piece Emerging green bonds are in their infancy but the more invested the deeper the capital pool will become. For investors, green bonds provide more bang for their ethical buck.

 

Information

 

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


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