SPECIAL REPORTS CALENDAR

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Special Reports Calendar

Date
Publication
Tuesday 18 Jan 2022
Future of Industry

Future of Industry

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 18 January 2021


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Introduction: Industry in the Era of Net Zero

The coronavirus pandemic has changed the way manufacturers work. As companies recover from the crisis, one thing is clear: the recovery must be green. How can manufacturers balance ensuring resilience and maintaining growth whilst also acting to reduce their carbon emissions? How can manufacturers manage the cost of the transition to net zero? Which technologies are enabling new production efficiencies and more sustainable practices? Are governments and policymakers doing enough to incentivise adoption and support lasting change? 


Resilient Supply Chains: How the Pandemic and the Shift Towards EVs is Shaking up the Auto Supply Chain

The pandemic forced manufacturers to re-think the resilience of their supply chains, moving from just in time to just in case. In recent months, supply chain bottlenecks have led to shortages of critical components of things like computer chips. The car industry, already gripped by the shift towards electric vehicles, is in the eye of the storm. How is the shift toward EVs impacting the auto supply chain - not everyone will survive. 


Future Factories: What is the Role for AI and Robots?

The many opportunities that have arisen from Industry 4.0 have long been acknowledged, but how has the pandemic accelerated change? What lessons has industry learned from the pandemic in relation to digital twins? How can AI and robots help to improve profitability? How can companies protect their networks and their IP against cyber espionage as manufacturing becomes increasingly digital?


How to Ensure a Just Transition for Workers

Coming out of Covid-19, companies face a large skills gap. What kind of skills do industrial companies need as their operations become increasingly digitised? How can companies hold on to their existing workforce and re-train them rather than start anew? What sort of policies and government incentives will be required to ensure large groups of people are not left behind, especially as economies transition to a net zero world?


Batteries: Hope for the Future?

Energy storage is critical if the world is to transition to net zero, with batteries seen by many as the key. Over the last decade a surge in lithium-ion battery production has led to an 85 percent decline in prices. What role can battery gigafactories play in future economies? Will they help Europe to become a force in its own right against China?


The Challenge for Niche Manufacturers 

How can niche sectors like ceramics or glass, which are made up of thousands of small and medium-sized companies, meet the challenges of digitisation and decarbonisation while at the same time protecting their bottom lines? 


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Aman Dogra +44 (0)20 7808790 530/ +49 (0)69 1568 5128, aman.dogra@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Wednesday 19 Jan 2022
Responsible Business Education
Wednesday 19 Jan 2022
The World

The World

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over 19 January 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Geopolitics in 2022:  Analysis by the FT's chief political commentator

 

Global Economy in 2022:  Analysis by the FT's chief economics commentator


The US Political Landscape in 2022


Business and Climate OpEd

How can business/consumption/capitalism-as-usual be compatible with any serious attempt to stop climate change? Is this delusional?


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Have #MeToo and BLM been the game-changers they appeared to be?


Technology: Is the backlash against Facebook and Big Tech likely to continue?


Healthcare

Covid has exposed the glaring inequalities in healthcare across the world. Are there any credible efforts to address these? And how ready are we for the next pandemic?


Trade/ Supply Chains

The grounding of the EverGiven and the dearth of chips for cars have highlighted the vulnerabilities of the world’s supply chains. Can we look forward to more of the same in 2022?


China's Xi Jinping

What are the global risks from Chinese economic tremors and military muscle-flexing?


Financial Markets, One Year on From GameStop

Have the retail investors meekly gone back to their corner?



Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Charlotte Morgan +44 (0) 20 7775 6822, charlotte.morgan@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


Monday 24 Jan 2022
FT Health: Future of Antibiotics - Burst 2
Friday 28 Jan 2022
Watches & Jewellery: January

Watches & Jewellery: January

The Financial Times proposes to publish this Special Report on 28 January 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Time Conserving

An increasing number of watch brands are talking up their conservation and sustainability credentials by supporting environmental initiatives. With consumer awareness around sustainability also on the rise, how do the industry’s eco-conscious promises match up with reality? 


CEO Interview

The new chief executive of a Swiss watchmaker jeweller speaks for the first time.


The Business of Using Hotels as Jewellery Outlets

Jewellers report selling a good portion of their work in luxury hotels, while others keep specific pieces back to only sell within the properties. What are the benefits? 


The Future of Watch Fairs

The latest Dubai Watch Fair’s success offers clues to the future model of global watch gatherings. 


Turkish Jewellery Designers in London

The new generation of jewellers who are modernising and expanding their local family businesses internationally. 


My Favourite Pieces

The impressive watch collection of a real estate chief executive and Instagram 'star'.


HYT Back

The Swiss watchmaker responsible for super-futuristic pieces with liquid time telling has been revived after going bankrupt this year. What will it do differently?


Signet Rings

Bigger, more colourful, more sparkly than ever before. What business opportunities have signet rings brought to brands that other types of rings or jewellery have not?


Plus News in Brief from both jewellery and watch industries





Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Yoon Sun Oh +33 (0)6 66 83 31 54, yoonsun.oh@ft.com

Nikola Peros +33 (6) 2805 8404, nikola.peros@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


Friday 28 Jan 2022
UK s Leading Management Consultants

UK’s Leading Management Consultants


The Financial Times proposes to publish this Special Report on 28 January 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Young Consultants

Early-career consultants need to be able to learn from their seniors, but the shift away from offices has made this much harder. Are younger cohorts, especially those who joined during the pandemic, receiving all the training and development they need to be effective? 

 

Race to Net Zero

Clients are reviewing their business models in the wake of COP26, creating a surge of activity across consultancies. Meanwhile firms’ discrete sustainability departments are being dissolved as the topic has gained prominence across all areas of client work. But can consultancies match demand, especially at a time when competition for talent is high?

 

Public Sector 

The Government Consulting Playbook was introduced earlier this year to tighten spending controls around the procurement of external consultants.The launch came amid increased scrutiny over the Government’s handling of Covid contracts. What will the playbook mean for how the government awards contracts in future, and will there be a material effect on firms? 

 

Growth in Exports

A recent survey showed that UK firms’ exports have doubled with 29 per cent of fee income gained from overseas compared with 16 per cent the previous year. This is in  part due to the switch to remote working leading to more overseas work due to ease of access and less travel. Is this temporary or is the shift likely to be sustained?

 

Supply Chain Risk

As the supply chain squeeze is expected to run well into 2022, we look at how consultancies are overhauling clients’ business models in anticipation of extended bottlenecks. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tech Consulting

The pandemic forced companies into a rapid shift towards remote working and online selling. The sudden change accelerated digital transformation projects for companies while cyber security and cloud computing have raced up the corporate agenda. Consultants are investing in tech teams and acquiring specialist businesses in an effort to capitalise on booming demand.


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Mark Magrane on 079855 352 176, mark.magrane@ft.com

Kate Childs-Carlile on 07980 532 947, kate.childscarlile@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Friday 28 Jan 2022
FT Health: Combating Pandemics - Burst 2
Monday 31 Jan 2022
The Future of AI & Digital Healthcare (Single Sponsor)
Thursday 03 Feb 2022
Circular Economy

Circular Economy

The Financial Times proposes to publish this Special Report on 03 February 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Too many failures, or the best that could be expected? 

Whatever the verdict on COP26, the parties made proposals for real action and pledged to reconvene at COP27 within a year to show how those promises are playing out. 


In this report, we examine how words can be translated by businesses and society into an on the ground revolution in making, using and re-using. 


Fashion

The rise of resale, rental and thrift-flipping. A familiar idea associated with charity shops and second-hand retailers, we look at moves by household names to explore this trend, which is being driven by younger consumers. 

Plus: A personal point of view on reusing  


Construction

Focus on cement. The sector stands out as one of the “hard-to-abate” industries - those facing the greatest challenges in overhauling themselves to reduce effect on the environment. We look at developments that aim to cut its impact on the environment, such as its high use of energy.


Car ManufacturingThe "Circular Car"

Much focus is rightly on emissions from fuel; but some carmakers are also reviewing the life cycle of materials, the resource-use in manufacturing processes, and making cars easier to repair and refurbish.


Packaging

Covid-19 has greatly increased the use of plastic, generating piles of waste but also reminders of its protective qualities. How could its use be curtailed? And what practical solutions are emerging to reuse plastic waste?

Plus: Would mandating compostable packaging be either practical or optimal? 


Design

The Circular Economy calls for extending the lifespan of a product. We look at designers’ ideas for incorporating features such as reuse and add-ons at the outset.

Focus on building design that emphasises modular buildings. 

 

Agriculture:  Regenerative Agriculture

We look at the waste products created by agriculture and how they could be reused - either on the farm, or turned into raw materials for other industries? 

Plus: Case studies from Big Agriculture.

Plus: Focus on soil

Depletion of soil across the world is well-documented. We look at why it is so important, and moves to restore it.


Oceans

Food and pharma producers are increasingly interested in seaweed as a resource. What will best practice in managing sustainable harvests look like? 


Architecture

From regulation to aesthetics, what are the hurdles to greater use of natural materials in buildings? 


Image Issues

Reuse and recycling are not new but they remain stubbornly unprestigious: lessons from the past that could help improve their appeal 


Energy

Who are the first movers in developing clean energy? What challenges do they face now?


Measurement Matters

Investors are increasingly pressing for clear, standardised information from companies on environmental, social and governance risks. We look at the bodies working on standards that would be widely accepted, and what they might look like 


Start-ups

Small companies have lots of bright ideas. How can they get their innovations taken up by big business, which has the expertise, infrastructure and finance to scale up?


Opinion

Column by someone with expertise in the Circular Economy



In Real Life

Case studies highlighting innovation and best practice in the Circular Economy, with an emphasis on biodiversity  



Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Ashley Hamilton +44 +44 (0)7565 060 179, ashley.hamilton@ft.com


Caitlin O’Sullivan +44 (0)20 7873 3743, caitlin.osullivan@ft.com


Oliver Higgs +44 (0)20 7775 6823, oliver.higgs@ft.com


Nick Phillips on +44 (0)20 7873 4216, nick.phillips@ft.com



or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised; Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Saturday 05 Feb 2022
The Business of Cricket

FT Scoreboard:

The Business of Cricket

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on February 05, 2022 


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

 

Introduction: The State of English Cricket

Following a tumultuous two years where global cricket was disrupted by the pandemic, 2022 appears in the year that sports bodies hope to return to growth. That will allow Tom Harrison, chief executive of the England and Wales Cricket Board, to implement his bold vision for the future of the sport in the UK. He was the driving force behind the creation of The Hundred, a new short form tournament screened on Sky and the BBC this year. But he still needs to safeguard the main moneymaker for English cricket: Test matches. How will he reconcile the rise of short form cricket with maintaining interest in the longer form? What is he doing to revive participation rates in the sport at grassroots level, while maintaining the sports appeal among broadcasters and sponsors? How can the sport compete for eyeballs against football, Formula One and the myriad other sports trying to appeal for the same audiences. We sit down with Harrison to diagnose the state of the English game post-covid.

 

How the IPL Might get even Richer

The Indian Premier League has become a multi-billion dollar business. The tournament is the highlight of a sporting calendar for a country of 1.4bn, each season attracting record viewership and higher advertising spend despite the pandemic’s disruption. The world’s best players flock to a competition where they are paid more for two-months work, compared to the rest of their earnings across the year. 

What’s next? Its broadcasting contract with Disney’s Star Sports expires soon, with US technology giants such as Amazon and Facebook hinting they could bid for the rights. Franchises have begun to sell stakes to big American investors. The influx of new capital, particularly from the US, may just fund more boom times for the IPL and cement India’s power over the global game.

 

Is The Hundred a Success?

There were many detractors when English cricket launched “The Hundred”, a new short form tournament delayed a year. But the idea had worthy goals: tackle falling interest in the sport and participation rates in recreational cricket. The ECB insists the effort to reach beyond the sport’s traditionalists has been a success: more than 10m people watched the tournament on television, many of whom will have been newcomers to the game. That was helped by ensuring games could be viewed on free-to-air television on the BBC. 450,000 people attended matches in person, including womens games that were run as double headers alongside men’s matches. Roughly 60 per cent of attendees were under 45, with women making up about a fifth. But can The Hundred establish itself as more than a novelty in its second year? That will require smarter broadcasting, attracting more star players from abroad, and supporters becoming tied to city-based franchises rather than casual viewers looking for a fun night out. 

 

The Future of Test Cricket

New Zealand became the first World Test champions, beating India in a rain-affected but ultimately thrilling final at Lord’s in 2021. The new trophy was meant to breathe new life into the ancient format, a way of creating a reason to follow the disparate series happening year around between Test match nations. It’s not clear that just creating a World Championship is enough. Outside England and Australia, Test matches rarely fill stadiums and the global viewership is ageing. What can the International Cricket Council, the global governing body, do to arrest these alarming trends? 

 

The Business of The Ashes 

The one Test series that retains its allure is the Ashes. Australian and English players - each nation’s fans - still consider lifting the urn the pinnacle of the sport. The event continues to attract the world’s biggest broadcasters. Discovery entered the running to screen the 2021 Ashes in the UK, seeking to challenge BT Sport for the rights. The series also underpins the ECB’s more than £1bn rights deal with Sky, with further income from sponsors such as LV=insurance. We analyse the revenues and business behind the world’s greatest Test series.

 

The Rise of the Women’s Game, and the Barriers to Parity

The 12th Women’s World Cup takes place in New Zealand in 2022, another event that has been postponed a year due to the pandemic. It takes place with the women’s game on the rise, particularly with substantial new money flowing into the game in heavyweight nations such as England, Australia and India - all three being among the favourites for the coveted trophy.  But further investment is required to professionalise the women’s game globally, to ensure it is a spectacle that can entice television companies to screen games. More funding is needed to market matches to new audiences. Only then can female players hope to not just move closer to pay parity with their male counterparts, but earn enough to consider cricket a worthwhile career to pursue.

 

Merchandising: Why a Startup is Betting on Cricket to Power Sportswear Sales 

Castore is a five-year-old Liverpool-based sportswear business that is seeking to take on global behemoths such as Nike and Adidas. To do so, it has begun to sign endorsement deals with sports teams and athletes, such as tennis star Sir Andy Murray and English Premier League teams Wolverhampton Wanderers and Newcastle United. But Castore has also signed new kitwear deals with the bodies that run English and West Indies cricket teams in the past two years. Why? Because the company’s strategy is to associate with sports groups and figures that have escaped the attention of its bigger, wealthier rivals. Castore also wants its brand noticed by cricket-obsessed, affluent men aged 35-50. We interview Tom Beahon, Castore’s 31-year-old chief executive, on why cricket might just power the rise of a new sportswear giant.

 

Column: (Matthew Engel? Simon Hughes? Ed Smith?) 

A star columnist is invited to reflects on the future of the game

 

 

 

 

Information

 

■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 

 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

 

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 

 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

 

Tom Da Costa on +44 (0)20 7873 4569, tom.dacosta@ft.com

 

or your usual Financial Times representative.

 

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised, Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 

 


Monday 07 Feb 2022
5G and Connectivity

5G and Connectivity

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 7 February 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


5G is the fifth generation of cellular networks. Providers say these can be up to 100 times faster than 4G networks and will create significant new opportunities for people and businesses. These could include e-health applications, connected vehicles and advanced mobile cloud gaming. But why are they taking so long to make an impression on everyday lives? 

What is 5G Today - and What is Coming?

“Full fat” 5G is coming - this is where the network is upgraded not just on the radio equipment side but at the core as well - and that’s when you get the full benefits. 

A full-fat 5G aims to deliver on the original promise that 5G would be 100 times faster than 4G, have 1,000 times more capacity and deliver fabulous new services through ultra-low delay or latency. But how likely is this and how quickly can it be rolled out?  


The 5G Killer Apps

What are going to be the “killer apps” that mean people and businesses will actually want or need 5G technology? Vodafone, Telenor and Deutsche Telekom have all said they are focusing on the long-term use cases around connected divides or the Internet of Things, and the most specific use case highlighted in recent years has been remote surgery. More recently, IBM suggested that connecting maintenance robots was the so-called killer application for 5G. But what about consumers? What is the point of a 5G phone connection if there are no killer apps for consumers and leisure users? 


Industrial 5G/ Private Networks. 

Regulators are allocating more telecom spectrum to businesses so they can build and maintain their own private 5G networks — these are networks that don't share traffic with other cellular networks in the vicinity, giving companies complete control and full capacity; a potential game changer for industrial groups. According to a recent Forbes study: “Private 5G networks offer compelling and irresistible benefits to manufacturers because 5G-enabled technologies are the foundation of smart manufacturing and smart factories. This includes advanced technologies where private 5G networks are essential, such as collaborative mobile robots, self-driving machines, swarm intelligence, automatic guided vehicles (AGVs), augmented reality (AR) predictive maintenance, AR/VR headsets, digital twins, But what are the costs, and are they worth it? 


Network Suppliers and Open RAN

“Open RAN” is a hot topic for suppliers in the post-Huawei markets of the UK and US, after they decided against using the Chinese group’s kit. RAN stands for Radio-access networks - which connect the base stations that transmit and receive traffic to from endpoints like cell phones and laptops and provide the link toward the carrier core network. And Open RAN is a push for industry standards in the design of equipment in these networks - and therefore particularly relevant to the buildout of 5G infrastructure. So how will it pan out?   


After 5G...6G?

6G is already being talked about. But what needs to happen now to deliver it? And is it perhaps time to move beyond the “Gs” as none has really delivered a radically different connectivity experience. Should we move on from pretending 5G is so very different to 4.9G if no one can tell the difference? 


US, China and Europe - The Battlegrounds for Standards 

We look at conflicts over 5G standards, bringing out the tensions between the US, China and Europe. There is already a rivalry between China and the US over 5G standards and the future of the equipment - is this the US trying to get a foothold in an industry dominated by Chinese and European players? We also assess which companies and countries are in the ascendancy on 5G equipment.


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Ashley Hamilton +44 +44 (0)7565 060 179, ashley.hamilton@ft.com

Nick Phillips on +44 (0)20 7873 4216, nick.phillips@ft.com

Oliver Higgs +44 (0)20 7775 6823, oliver.higgs@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content



Saturday 12 Feb 2022
Collecting: Art on the West Coast
Monday 14 Feb 2022
Business Education 2022 (1) - Global MBA Rankings

FT Business Education: 

Global MBA Ranking 2022

The Financial Times plans to publish this magazine on February 14 2022.

Advertising booking deadline: January 17 2022

(Advertising copy deadline: January 24 2022)

We are likely to include the following articles (please note that this list is provisional):

Introduction

An analysis of the leading business schools for MBA programmes and the underlying trends amid turbulent times.


Editor‘s Letter

Looking at developments in business education and our coverage. 


Management Column

Andrew Hill, the FT’s management editor, explores current thinking around leadership. 


Professor’s Column 

A business school professor shares their thoughts and research on challenges facing ethical business today. 


Charting MBA Data

The FT’s rankings team use graphics to explore trends in the data that went to make up this year’s list.


Study Time?

2020 was a record year for MBA applications and the trend continued into 2021. But admissions consultants say a growing job market and the emergence of new Covid variants is making some prospective students think twice. Is now the right time to apply for an MBA?

 

Top Profs

Business schools need the best professors to attract the best students and deans say wage costs are rising as they compete for the top academics. Increasingly, schools are hiring industry executives to teach classes and academics are coming under pressure to demonstrate the real-world impact of research and adapt to online teaching.

Careers

How is the jobs market looking for the covid graduates? Many of those who started MBAs to escape a torrid labour market in the early days of the pandemic have now graduated. Has the gamble paid off, and have they managed to move into new careers or sectors?

 

Case Study

It is a century since the first teaching case was launched by Harvard. We look back at the groundbreaking case - on The General Shoe Company - and the importance of the model.

 

Interview

An in-depth interview with a graduate about their studies and what their MBA has meant for their career.

 

Applications: Expert advice on successful applications to MBA programmes

 

Student Views

MBA students and graduates share their experiences of study and what came next.

 

Technology

An FT tech specialist explores developments that will affect business and our working lives. 

 

Books: Recent titles of interest to students.  

 

In Real Life

A graduate explains what it was like to take an MBA and how it has affected their career, in their own words.  

Editorial information:

Special Reports are written by FT staff journalists and a small number of selected freelance writers. They will be specialists in the field and already have regular contacts to update them. It is therefore difficult for an unsolicited submission to be so compelling that it forces its way on to a writer’s agenda. However, it does happen occasionally. We ask that all submissions be sent to ftreports@ft.com, from where they are forwarded to the appropriate writer.

Please also note that due to the volume of material received, it is not always possible to acknowledge or reply to every submission.

■ Recently published Surveys and FT Reports, as well as a list of forthcoming FT Reports and their synopses can be downloaded by going to www.ft.com/special-reports and clicking on the link to the Reports library.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

■ Back issues of printed Survey and FT Reports can be obtained from: Historic Newspapers, Signature Online Limited, No 1 waterside Station Road, Harpenden, Herts, AL5 4US; Tel. no: 0870 165 1470; Fax no: 01582 469 248; or email: info@back-issue-newspapers.co.uk

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Supplements and Special Reports.

Advertisement Information

For further details of advertising opportunities, please contact:

Jackie King +1 917 551 5113, jackie.king@ft.com

Matthew Rodford +44 79212 50719, matthew.rodford@ft.com

Rachel Spence +44 (0)20 7873 3290, rachel.spence@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 



Tuesday 15 Feb 2022
Investing in Nigeria

Investing in Nigeria 

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on February 15 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Introduction

The powerhouse of Africa continues to excel and disappoint in equal measure. Some of Africa's most exciting start-ups and some of its best banks and businesses are based here, but have an influence far beyond Nigeria's borders. Yet the economy continues to flounder, government revenues are still shaky and the security situation alarming.  The FT takes a close look at Africa's most exciting and most frustrating market. 


Economy

The Nigerian economy was suffering even before the coronavirus pandemic sent it into its second recession in five years. It’s since recovered, but joblessness is rife and inflation is soaring. The FT explores how Africa’s biggest economy is performing. 


Oil & Gas

Energy transition: just like any other oil producer, Nigeria is coming under market pressure to switch from oil. Funding is getting harder for oil - and even gas - projects and there is increasing talk that countries that press ahead with hydrocarbon developments will be left with stranded assets. How is Nigeria confronting these pressures? 


Banking

Nigeria’s pension system has $30bn in assets under management, but roughly 80 per cent is invested in government instruments. The FT explores an underserved sector that could explode with the right regulations and products. 


State governor Q&A

The FT talks to two Nigerian governors about the country’s greatest challenges and opportunities. 


Tech

Money is flowing into startups in Lagos. But other sectors - in particular healthcare and education - are even more ripe for disruption. The FT takes a look at Nigeria’s startup scene beyond the well-covered fintech space. 


Equity markets

Why are Nigeria’s equity markets so disappointing? There are only about 100k active traders, for a country of 200m people and the biggest economy in Africa, and only about one IPO a year. Could a regulatory overhaul inject new life? 

Agriculture

The FT looks at trends in Nigeria’s most important sector. Both government and the private sector have turned their attention to food production, with mixed results. 


Education

NewGlobal, once better known as Bridge International Academies, has been awarded contracts in both Edo and Lagos state to help run some 2,000 state primary schools. This piece will examine one of the world’s most ambitious programmes in partnerships with so-called edtech to see if it is bringing results.


Food:  A look at the culinary scene in Lagos. 


Culture

Art, Music, Nollywood. Nigeria's creative industries are the envy of the continent.    


Tourism

The pandemic-linked international airport closure helped convince a whole new generation of Nigerians to explore their country, as small tour operators saw a surge in business. The FT looks at Nigeria’s nascent tourism industry.)


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Mark Carwardine: +44 (0)20 7873 4880, mark.carwardine@ft.com


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or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Wednesday 16 Feb 2022
FT Health: Future of Antibiotics - Burst 3
Tuesday 22 Feb 2022
Sustainable Food and Agriculture - Burst 3a (Single Sponsor)
Friday 25 Feb 2022
FT Health: Combating Pandemics - Burst 3
Monday 28 Feb 2022
FT Health: Innovation in Healthcare - Burst 1
Monday 28 Feb 2022
Regulated Markets

Regulated Markets

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report online, on 28 February 2022


An FT report on working - and adapting - to global regulatory standards, in order to gain full access to markets around the world. It will assess what companies and their leaders need to do to comply with standards in a breadth of sectors, from finance and manufacturing to sustainability, data protection, and more.

 

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

 

Financial Services: Can US Firms Comply with China? 

Many US finance groups are seeking to take advantage of increasing market access in China — despite concerns about the political and regulatory climate in the country. In late 2021, Goldman Sachs received regulatory approval to take full ownership of its securities joint venture in China, allowing the investment bank to expand in the country. How did Goldman go about that and what can other US firms learn from it?   

 

Climate: Proving Corporate Claims

With companies under pressure to cut their carbon emissions faster and move to more sustainable forms of energy, they need to prove their pledges and glossy reports are genuine. And that means having proof of their sustainable energy sourcing and getting their various environmental claims validated. Similarly, renewable energy suppliers need to be able to show that their systems are not only efficient and sustainable but also safe and reliable. So how do they do that - and who checks up on them? 

 

Automotive: Shifting up to Higher Standards 

A global shift to electric and hybrid vehicles, at the same time as autonomous driving technologies are being installed in them, is creating a complex regulatory and legal challenge for carmakers. Manufacturers not only have to ensure they are making safe use of next-generation batteries and vehicle propulsion systems but must also ensure driver-assistance systems do not endanger lives or pose ethical problems. We look at the standards they must meet in various countries.

 

Pharmaceuticals: Deal Prices and Drug Prices Under Scrutiny

Pharma and biotech groups were warned that greater regulatory scrutiny was coming when the US Federal Trade Commission and its counterparts in the EU, UK and Canada said they look more closely at the volume of takeover deals and soaring drug prices. But will this make it harder for groups to enter global markets and sub-sectors via acqusitions? Or are there changes in approach that pharma and biotechs can make to ensure markets stay opener for mergers and acquisitions?   

 

Industry: Post-Brexit Regulation and “Double” Standards 

Regulatory divergence was meant to create more flexibility for UK industry after Brexit but has so far only doubled up the reporting requirements. Chemicals companies were asked to register chemical substances with a new “UK Reach” database, essentially duplicating the EU Reach database run by the EU Chemicals Agency. Manufacturers were also required to adopt a new “UKCA” safety and quality mark for UK goods after leaving the EU scheme - but have said they need more time. Why is the reporting so time-consuming costly - and what do companies want to see changed?  

 

Data: Freedom and Protection

Compliance with global standards is essential for any business seeking to handle and transfer personal data. A company operating in Europe, for example, must meet EU data security rules and show a data adequacy certification. Here, the most widely accepted standard is ISO 27001 -  the only auditable standard for Information Security Management Systems (ISMS) and one which ensures compliance with US Sarbanes-Oxley legislation and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in the European Union. But how hard is it for companies to meet the standard as data is stored and transferred across multiple locations?

 

Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Ashley Hamilton +44 +44 (0)7565 060 179, ashley.hamilton@ft.com

Oliver Higgs +44 (0)20 7775 6823, oliver.higgs@ft.com

 Nick Phillips on +44 (0)20 7873 4216, nick.phillips@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised, Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Tuesday 01 Mar 2022
Early List Publication - FT 1000: Europes Fastest-Growing Companies
Tuesday 01 Mar 2022
Sustainable Food and Agriculture - Burst 3b (Single Sponsor)
Saturday 05 Mar 2022
Collecting: Art & Antiques
Monday 07 Mar 2022
FTfm Special: ETFs 1
Tuesday 08 Mar 2022
Women in Business 1

Women in Business

The Financial Times proposes to publish this Special Report on March 08, 2022.


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


The World Pivots

What next for women at work? Times of turmoil offer a chance to reset work cultures, to fix persistent barriers, to widen opportunities.


Many women at all stages of their careers are considering a change of direction - whether from necessity or choice.  


The Women in Business report looks at how organisations and individuals are rethinking workplace culture amid the current uncertainty to make it easier for women to succeed. 


Careers Planning

What women need to know, whether early in their career or planning a change of direction. We ask women who have navigated a career path, advisers and FT readers for their experiences and advice.


Workplace

Will labour / skills shortages allow women to ask for  “perks” such as flexible working?


Money:  We look at a pressing question, from pay to pensions. 


Climate Change Champions:  Women taking a lead on climate issues. 


Country focus 

We look at one country’s approach to gender diversity to find out what works, what doesn’t,  and why.


Industry Focus:  How to make it in the creative sector


Profile:  Interview with a woman who has made her mark


Entrepreneurship

More women opt to be their own boss for a variety of reasons. We look at the appeal and the challenges, from raising funds to experts’ tips


Double acts

- How dual-career couples make it work

- Business partnerships after divorce


Column :  The big questions of the day for women’s careers


How do I …?   :  Practical pointers for the workplace


First Burst:  What is it like to be among the first women in male dominated world?


Home Front

- What is maternity leave for? 

- What effect will flexible working have on childcare businesses, working women, and employers? 


Essay

The winning article addresses the challenges to women joining boards in an essay contest held by the FT, Henley Business School, and the 30% Club.


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Sophy Pierre +331 5376 8255, sophy.pierre@ft.com


Marine Baranger +331 5376 8255, marine.baranger@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influen



Tuesday 08 Mar 2022
Sustainable Food and Agriculture - Burst 3c (Single Sponsor)
Monday 14 Mar 2022
Business Education 2022 (2) - Online Learning
Thursday 17 Mar 2022
Early List Publication - FT Asia-Pacific High Growth Companies
Friday 18 Mar 2022
Innovative Lawyers: Intelligent Business
Saturday 19 Mar 2022
Collecting: Art in Asia
Saturday 19 Mar 2022
Climate Change for Schools - Burst 2

Climate Change for Schools

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on March 19, 2022


Introduction

Climate change affects every aspect of life, from health to economic growth, migration and politics. Young people will be most affected and have been vocal in calling for change. This report, part of the free FT Schools programme, will explore key trends and responses for use in the classroom and beyond.

 

Climate Change Science. 

A look at the latest scientific insights to understand the key trends, mechanisms and implications of global warming, the contribution of human factors and possible responses.  

 

Extreme Weather. 

An examination of the patterns and mechanisms driving record high and low temperatures, fires, floods, shifts in ocean currents and other phenomena affecting lives around the world. 

 

Economics of Externalities. 

Energy extraction, use and emissions involve externalities that fail to impose the full societal costs on individual producers and consumers. An exploration of the implications and responses such as regulation, carbon taxes and cap and trade. 

 

Politics of Climate Change. 

Post Paris and Glasgow, and in the build up to COP27 in Sharm El-Sheikh later this year, how far are countries acting on agreed targets and how is the politics shifting? What effect is citizen pressure and student activism having?  

 

What can Individuals do? 

A look at key sectors contributing to climate change most relevant to young people, such as food, digital activity, consumer goods, recycling, travel: what does the best data say about the trade-offs individuals can make to reduce their carbon footprint?

 

Climate Tech Innovation

A critical analysis of the potential and feasibility of broader approaches to tackle climate change, such as carbon capture and storage, hydrogen-powered planes, tackling excessive emissions in cement/construction, packaging reduction, batteries, nuclear fusion

 

Investment

How can young people most effectively use their own money through savings and investments to make green choices, or by lobbying for change including through divestment campaigns?

 

School Climate Champions: 

Short profiles of some of the most powerful and innovative activities submitted to the FT by students and their schools to tackle climate change in their classrooms and communities. around the world.   

 

Teacher Resources. 

A selection of FT content/graphics to spark classroom discussions in subjects including economics, business, politics and geography.

 

Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Paul Hutt + 65 8298 1482, paul.hutt@ft.com


Judith Lim +65 8298 1483, judith.lim@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised that Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Monday 21 Mar 2022
FT Health: Innovation in Healthcare - Burst 2
Monday 21 Mar 2022
FT 1000: Europes Fastest-Growing Companies
Monday 21 Mar 2022
FTfm Special: Fixed Income 1
Monday 28 Mar 2022
Women at the Start
Tuesday 29 Mar 2022
Investing in Mauritius

Investing in Mauritius

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 29 March 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Introduction

Mauritius, considered one of Africa’s greatest success economic stories, has been badly impacted by the Covid pandemic, which has damaged its tourist industry and led to the island state’s first recession since independence. There have been signs of public discontent at the political class and international developments that complicate its position as a low-tax jurisdiction. Are these just bumps in the road on the way to the high-income status to which Mauritius now reasonably aspires? Or do recent difficulties point to deeper weaknesses? 


Economy

This article will assess macroeconomic policy and the changing nature of a diversification strategy that has sought to balance sectors from sugar and textile production to financial services, education and technological innovation in pursuit of a modern and prosperous economy.


Offshore Financial and Banking Industry

More than 32,000 companies are registered in Mauritius, which is positioning itself as a gateway to Africa. There are 22 banks with a presence on the island, a number of which are international in scope. Mauritius has been seeking to move up the financial services ladder by providing legal and other services that make its registered companies more than just a brass plate on a door. Its success in providing the quality financial services and legal predictability that companies need will determine its durability as a financial services hub.


Tax

Mauritius’s status as a low tax jurisdiction has been damaged by the end of a double tax agreement with India and by international moves to better regulate low-tax centres. It was also threatened by the Financial Action Task Force, which had put Mauritius on a list of countries needing close monitoring for money laundering and terrorism financing, althoguh it has now been removed. Mauritius is a signature to global agreements seeking to clamp down on tax havens. What is Mauritius’ future as a low tax jurisdiction?


Politics

Although a functioning democracy, with regular elections and proper parliamentary scrutiny, Mauritian politics have been dominated by two families since independence. Can this state of affairs last as the country seeks to position itself as a modern economy and an open society?


Ecology

The oil spill from a Japanese tanker has highlighted the country’s vulnerability to environmental damage. Rising sea levels pose a longer term threat to parts of the coastline. How Mauritius manages its natural environment is of crucial importance to its future. 


Tourism

In designing its anti-Covid response, Mauritius has had to balance the health of its population with the needs of the country’s tourist industry, which relies on people entering and leaving the island freely. Much of the industry suffered badly during periods of strict lockdown. How can Mauritius rebuild from here and will its tourist strategy, already evolving pre-pandemic, have to shift again?


Manufacturing

Mauritius developed a successful manufacturing export strategy in a continent that has generally been ravaged by cheap imports, particularly from China. How robust is the island’s textile sector given the island’s rising wages, and can the manufacturing sector shift to higher-valued areas of production to stay competitive?


Chagos Islands

The continuing controversy over ownership of the Chagos Islands, still part of the UK, rumbles on. The US has a vital base on Diego Garcia, which it leases from Britain, and has supported British claims to sovereignty. But the International Court of Justice in the Hague court has determined that the islands belong to Mauritius and UN maps now show the islands as part of the country. There is also growing pressure to give people forcibly removed from the islands British citizenship. How can this dispute be resolved and what does it say about Mauritius’s location in the increasingly contested waters of the Indian Ocean? 


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Mark Carwardine: +44 (0)20 7873 4880, mark.carwardine@ft.com

Larry Kenney: +44 (0)20 7873 4835, larry.kenney@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

Thursday 31 Mar 2022
Ghana & the Age of African Free Trade
Friday 01 Apr 2022
Watches & Jewellery: April
Monday 04 Apr 2022
Health at Work 2022 - Microsite (Single Sponsor)
Tuesday 05 Apr 2022
Early List Publication - FT The Americas Fastest-Growing Companies
Thursday 07 Apr 2022
Early List Publication - Europe s Climate Leaders
Thursday 07 Apr 2022
FT Asia-Pacific High Growth Companies
Friday 08 Apr 2022
FT Wealth 2022 - April
Saturday 09 Apr 2022
Art of Fashion SS22
Monday 11 Apr 2022
Business Education: Asia-Pacific Business Schools

Asia Pacific Business Education

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on April 11, 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


The Rise of Asian Pacific Business Education

Demand is increasing for business qualifications among Asian students, but regional political and economic disruptions, new practices and intensifying competition are changing the patterns of demand and the nature of schools.


Covid Adaptations

Asian business schools and their host countries were early to respond to coronavirus with tough control measures to limit infection spread. A look at the measures that have since been introduced to ensure safety on campus and evolve their teaching with practices such as more blended learning.


What Employers Want

An examination of trends among Asian-based recruiters: how far do they value different business education degrees, what skills are they seeking and from which countries and institutions are they hiring?


Regional Customisation

Asian schools are increasingly developing their own case studies, teaching resources and curricula tailored to reflect the particular experiences of businesses, corporate culture and values. Examples of innovations and best practices.


The Shifting Attraction of the West.

High costs, less certain job prospects and ambivalence towards immigration reflected in visa regimes have shaken up the traditional lure of North American and European institutions for some Asians, while the lure of the most prestigious schools continues to attract some of the best.


Foreign Campuses

A growing number of Asian business schools are expanding their offerings in other parts of the world with campuses and partnerships, to give their students experience elsewhere and to attract students from other continents. American and European schools are taking similar measures in Asia.


Professor Op-ed

Insights from a leading academic based in Asia on cutting-edge research and trends of use to business and management.


Emerging Asia.

An exploration of the nature of fresh demand for business education and local and regional providers from fast-growing countries such as Indonesia, Vietnam and the Philippines.


Regional Case Studies

Examples of provision in different countries such as well established schools in

China, Hong Kong, Singapore and Australia, to regional players in Japan, Korea and

India.


Directory

An interactive listing of the leading schools in the region by institution, country, course, fees, student numbers and other key indicators.


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Rachel Spence +44 (0)20 7873 3290, rachel.spence@ft.com

Jackie King +1 917 551 5113, jackie.king@ft.com

Matt Rodford +44 79212 50719, matthew.rodford@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised, Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Wednesday 13 Apr 2022
FT Health: Future of Antibiotics - Burst 4
Saturday 16 Apr 2022
Collecting: Venice Biennale
Thursday 21 Apr 2022
Investing in Tanzania
Monday 25 Apr 2022
FT Health: Innovation in Healthcare - Burst 3
Thursday 28 Apr 2022
FT The Americas Fastest-Growing Companies
Tuesday 03 May 2022
Early List Publication - FT Africa s Fastest Growing Companies
Thursday 05 May 2022
Europe s Climate Leaders
Monday 09 May 2022
Business Education 2022 (3) - Executive Education
Monday 09 May 2022
Brazil: Sustainable Business

Brazil in 2022

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 23 March 2022


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

 

Introduction: Brazil in 2022

Latin America's biggest economy faces a crossroads in 2022. What promises to be a highly divisive presidential election will pit incumbent hard-right president Jair Bolsarno against veteran leftist Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva as the country struggles to emerge from one of the world's worst coronavirus epidemics and put the economy back on track. After four years of Bolsonaro's Trumpian brand of populism, Brazilians long for a moderate, pragmatic administration but they are highly unlikely to get it. 

 

Interview with Brazil president Jair Bolsonaro

[An interview has been requested but cannot be guaranteed]


Brazil’s Economy and Reforms 

Brazil's business lobby were enthusiastic supporters of the Bolsonaro government, hoping it would deliver major reforms to overhaul taxation and curb a bloated and costly state. But as the president enters his final year, many of those hopes have been frustrated and most of the structural change awaits the next government. Can Brazil overcome a chronic inability to improve its infrastructure and boost its international competitiveness or is it destined to remain mainly a commodity exporter? 

 

Brazil, Governance and Social Change

Environmental issues dominate the debate in Brazil, but the social aspect of ESG is hugely important. Despite accounting for almost 60 per cent of the country’s 210m population, black Brazilians occupy less than 5 per cent of executive positions and 5 per cent of seats on company boards. What progress is Brazil making on racial issues? Interview/profile of Edvaldo Vieira, chief executive of healthcare group Amil.

 

Elections of 2022

Two titans of Brazilian politics are poised to square off in 2022. But where and how will the election be decided? Dispatch from the battleground northeast, where both Lula and Bolsonaro are vying for crucial swing voters. What are the issues that will decide the election?

 

Brazil’s Droughts - The Climate Challenge

Increasingly severe droughts threaten Brazilian agriculture and industry, while environmental migration looms as a new obstacle for Latin America. What is being done now to stave off the climate crisis in Brazil? Will a potential Lula administration change tack on the environment?


Privatising Brazil 

Brazil is in many ways an outlier in driving ahead with an ambitious privatisation programme. A planned multibillion dollar sale of shares in state-controlled power utility Eletrobras is a pillar of the government’s liberal economic agenda and will test the water ahead of the proposed privatisation of Brazil’s postal service. What are investors being offered and will they buy into it?


Start-up Fundraising

This year has already smashed records for start-up fundraising and the momentum promises to continue in 2022. What accounts for the success of Brazil’s start-up sector and which companies are hitting the big time?


Brazil’s Science Heroes  

The Butantan biomedical institute emerged as one of the heroes of the Covid-19 pandemic thanks to its production of the Chinese CoronaVac jab and the creation of its own vaccine. What is the future for this poster child of Brazilian science post Covid? 

 

Security in Brazil

Security and violence dominated the election that brought Jair Bolsonaro to power in 2018. Will it loom so large in 2022? In recent years, gang violence has shifted away from cities like Sao Paulo towards the north of Brazil as drug traffickers take advantage of Amazonian riverine arteries.

 

Brazil’s Wine Industry 

Brazil has long been an agribusiness powerhouse, with much of its agribusiness and food industry centred in the region of Triângulo Mineiro. But there are some less likely food and beverage growth stories in the country also. Several specialist food and beverage industries are taking off unexpectedly in Brazil - including winemakers.


Information


■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information


For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Alessandre Siano +55(11) 992 912 814, alessandre.siano@ft.com


Brendan Spain +1 917 794 8524, brendan.spain@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

Wednesday 11 May 2022
The New Angola
Thursday 12 May 2022
Early List Publication - Asia-Pacific Climate Leaders
Friday 13 May 2022
Innovative Lawyers: Asia-Pacific
Saturday 14 May 2022
Collecting: Frieze (New York)
Wednesday 18 May 2022
FT Health: Future of Antibiotics - Burst 5
Friday 20 May 2022
FT Wealth 2022 - Entrepreneurs
Thursday 26 May 2022
FT Africa s Fastest Growing Companies
Saturday 11 Jun 2022
Collecting: Art in Europe
Monday 13 Jun 2022
Business Education 2022 (4) - Financial Training
Monday 13 Jun 2022
Asia-Pacific Climate Leaders
Saturday 25 Jun 2022
Collecting: Summer
Saturday 25 Jun 2022
Art of Fashion: Jewellery 2022
Friday 01 Jul 2022
FT Wealth 2022 - July
Friday 08 Jul 2022
Watches & Jewellery: Jewellery Special
Tuesday 19 Jul 2022
FT Health: Future of Antibiotics - Burst 6
Saturday 27 Aug 2022
Art of Fashion AW22
Friday 02 Sep 2022
Watches & Jewellery: September
Friday 02 Sep 2022
FT Wealth 2022 - September
Monday 12 Sep 2022
Business Education 2022 (5) - Masters in Management
Saturday 01 Oct 2022
Collecting: Design Art
Friday 07 Oct 2022
Watches & Jewellery: Asia Special
Saturday 08 Oct 2022
Collecting: Frieze Week
Monday 17 Oct 2022
Business Education 2022 (6) - Executive MBA
Friday 28 Oct 2022
FT Wealth 2022 - Family Office
Friday 04 Nov 2022
Watches & Jewellery: November
Monday 07 Nov 2022
Health at Work 2022 - Magazine (Single Sponsor)
Tuesday 08 Nov 2022
Managing Climate Change
Saturday 26 Nov 2022
Collecting: Art in The Americas
Friday 02 Dec 2022
FT Wealth 2022 - December
Monday 05 Dec 2022
Business Education 2022 (7) - European Business School

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