SPECIAL REPORTS CALENDAR

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Special Reports Calendar

Date
Publication
Monday 11 May 2020
Business Education 2020 (3) - Executive Education

Business Education: Executive Education

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on May 11th, 2020


We are likely to include the following articles (please note that this list is provisional):


Introduction

A wave of investment in new courses and teaching facilities is transforming the executive education market. Business schools have realised that there is a great market opportunity, but they also know that they need to up their game to see off competitive threats from new training providers and large companies taking executive education in house.


Comment

from Andrew Jack, the FT’s global learning editor, on current issues in business education.


Ranking & Methodology

We explore the trends highlighted by the executive education ranking and how different schools fared this year. 


Management Column

FT management editor Andrew Hill explores developments in business leadership.


Professors Column

A management professor from a leading institution shares their theories and research 


Interview

with a former executive education student. Why did they decide to take the course, what did they gain from it and how has it applied to their career?


The 5G Workforce

With up to five generations predicted to be working in one office by 2030, business schools are launching courses to help executives to lead multigenerational workforces. They focus on helping executives to develop a clear understanding of generations’ different expectations - and how to learn from people of different ages. 


Beating Burnout

There is growing awareness of the risk of burnout, with some large companies launching training courses to ensure senior leaders are in good physical and mental health. Business schools have also launched wellness programmes, teaching executives mindfulness techniques to combat stress and raise productivity. 



Digital Skills

One of the fastest growing markets in executive education is the teaching of digital skills. This article looks at some of the new courses being designed by leading business schools and asks which skills are most sought after by employers.


Executive Education-Only Schools

Some business schools in the US and UK have dropped or suspended their MBAs and are focusing on executive education. What does it mean for the brand what are the pros and cons of becoming an exec ed-only school? 


Business Books Reviews: A guide to some of the best of the recent crop of management books.


Technology

One of the FT’s technology team looks at new innovations and what they might mean for the world of work. 


In Real Life: A student's personal career journey and how executive education has done for them. 


Information


Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Gemma Taylor +44 (0)20 7873 3698, gemma.taylor@ft.com

 

Rachel Spence +44 (0)20 7873 3290, rachel.spence@ft.com

 

Jackie King +1 917 551 5113, jackie.king@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

Monday 11 May 2020
FTfm Special: Responsible Investing

FTfm Special Report: Responsible Investing

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on the 11th May, 2020.


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Which Sustainable Development Goal-related sectors generated significant returns for investors in 2019 and which stumbled?


Updated guide on the up and coming sustainability metrics for investors. Why is it so difficult to arrive at a single framework and set of metrics that enable responsible investors to compare companies performance


We assess how Asia is playing catchup when it comes to responsible investing


The European Securities and Markets Authority’s chairman told a recent FT event that the supervision of ESG ratings was “far from optimal”. We look at how investor protections might be improved and greenwashing curbed.


Talk of the US adopting some kind of carbon tax is growing louder and the EU plans a carbon border tax: what are the implications for responsible investors if these plans materialise?


Interview with a prominent Norwegian investor as Norway juggles with the contradictions of being a major oil and gas producer and operating a sovereign wealth fund with a responsible investing focus on divesting from hydrocarbons


Is a growing clamour for responsible investing likely to make asset management a more attractive profession for women? We talk to female professionals to find out.

Information

 

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Supplements and Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Tom da Costa on +44 (0)20 7873 4569, tom.dacosta@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence 

Monday 11 May 2020
Asia Business Guide

Asia Business Guide

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in April 20, 2020
We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Asia is a complex fast-changing collection of markets with great opportunity, and many potential pitfalls even for the initiated. How do outsiders - western investors and businesses - get a piece of the action? This special report by FT correspondents and columnists sets out the opportunities and risks, with case studies and expert advice from the region and beyond.

Investment Patterns

Which countries and sectors in Asia are Asian investors putting their money and where have Europeans and others dared to tread. With charts

Asia Tech Disrupters

Asia is home to the most vibrant tech start-up scene in the world. More unicorns (start-ups valued at over $1bn) exist in China, India, Japan, south-east Asia and elsewhere than in any other region of the world. Digital technologies, AI and other recent advances are acting as multipliers, allowing nascent companies build scale and cross borders with speed. What are the opportunities to invest in these companies? What are the potential pitfalls to avoid?

Sustainable Investing

We talk to upcoming Asian business owners and investors who may be keener on sustainable business than previous generations. What are they investing in or what would they like to invest in when they take charge? We explore whether there are new points of sustainable investing in Asia for a younger generation of investors in the west seeking responsible investing opportunities.

Financial Markets

Foreigners have always struggled to get into the Chinese market and this is why the Chinese stock market, the main route in, has grown more slowly than the economy. Is a spate of recent market opening moves enough to significantly improve western investors’ access to local markets?

Southeast Asia

Author Partag Khanna has promoted the idea that South East Asia will take over from China as Asia's engine of growth. How far is this true? What opportunities are created for investors? Or/Plus. Case studies in a couple of the fastest-growing emerging markets. Eg Myanmar, Cambodia, Vietnam

New Services

We look at the role played by Asia's new digital banks and professional services firms in facilitating foreign investment. 

Fintech

Fintech is developing much faster in Asia than in Europe and the US - what do western investors need to know about this sector. 

Asian States Fund AI Unicorns. 

The transformative power of AI is set to be applied across industries, creating trillions of US dollars in value, according to McKinsey, the consultancy.  What is the role of the state, and what are opportunities for private sector players? 

Real Estate

With Hong Kong in the doldrums because of the political conflict with Beijing, companies investing in the region are looking at Singapore as an alternative hub. This is expected to boost Singapore's role, creating demand for residential, retail and commercial property. What options are there for foreign investors?

Infrastructure 

Asian infrastructure needs over the next two decades will dominate global infrastructure investment. This is especially true for sustainable schemes including in energy and transport. But it is notoriously hard to invest in infrastructure because of its long lead times, regulatory knots and government involvement in projects and long term pricing regimes. Still, there are opportunities for private investors, especially those keen on sustainable options. What ways can be found through this maze?

Electric Vehicles

What does China’s rapid advances on electric vehicles mean for foreign rivals and investors

Japan - Activist Investors  

Have invested in several Japanese companies and in some cases forced corporate changes. How much does this signal a new readiness by Japanese groups to respond to shareholder demands even at the cost of their traditional loyalties to employees and corporate partners? Is this a long-awaited investment opportunity?


Information

■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library
Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:
Paul Hutt +65 8298 1482, paul.hutt@ft.com

Judith Lim +65 6671 4079, judith.lim@ft.com

Hiroko Hoshino +81 3 5219 2345, hiroko.hoshino@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 

Tuesday 12 May 2020
FT The Americas Fastest-Growing Companies

FT TheAmericas’ Fastest-Growing Companies

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in May 12, 2020
We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

The List

An introduction to the inaugural ranking of the region’s high-growth companies. The top 10 includes businesses from a diverse range of sectors but, as with other global regions, the tech sector dominates the overall list. Furthermore, nearly nine in 10 companies hail from the US or Canada but, when dissected by city, the ranking reveals some surprise hotspots. But looking forward, how resilient are these companies likely to be in the face of coronavirus - and could the epidemic even strengthen tech’s position over the next couple of years?

The Leader

A profile of the company reporting the highest revenue growth over 2015-18. Can it keep up the high compound annual growth rate? Does it have the competitive barrier to entry to turn that revenue into profit? And is it one of few companies in a position to turn the coronavirus crisis to its favour?

Country Focus: Colombia

In terms of the top 10 cities by number of companies, Colombia’s capital Bogota ranks joint fourth with Chicago, beating Atlanta, Sao Paolo and Los Angeles. What is it about the country’s business climate that has enabled it to deliver the third-highest number of companies to the ranking after the US and Canada?

Argentina Under Pressure 

We look at Argentina and ask whether the country’s start-up scene is being throttled by record inflation and a national debt crisis, or whether the political and economic climate is actually forcing entrepreneurs to think creatively.

Secor Focus: Property in Canada

Real estate has been the driving force of the Canadian economy for a decade but economic forces are now working against it. Meanwhile property listings aggregators have set out to provide an alternative to the monopoly that Canada’s realtors have long held on pricing information in the market and the big commissions that come with it. What effect will these conditions have on property companies on the ranking and beyond?

Sao Paulo

While Brazil is not likely to create a new social network or score a moonshot, there is a great deal of space for technology to improve people's lives in a country with huge social needs, whether in terms of tech-enabled education programmes to improve literacy, healthcare programmes to lower the cost of care or group buying to reduce the price of basic goods. 

Milking It

An Australian and a New Zealander started a vertically-integrated dairy producer in Bahia, Brazil, from scratch. Its milk is now in every top supermarket in the country and the dairy business is so productive that each hectare yields three times more milk than it would in New Zealand, one of the world’s most efficient producers.

The Ranking

A detailed list of all 500 companies to make the cut - the online version is interactive. 
 

Information

■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 
 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.
 

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.
 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Rene Perez +1 201 286 7927, rene.perez@ft.com 

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content. 


 
Friday 15 May 2020
The Future of AI & Digital Healthcare (Single Sponsor)
Monday 18 May 2020
Responsible Business in a Crisis - Burst 1
Responsible Business in a Crisis
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 18 & 25 May,  & O1 June 2020.


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

With financial markets plummeting and some companies facing oblivion as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, businesses are under pressure to turn away from recent pledges of improved environmental, social and governance (ESG) performance. Yet along with each-man-for-himself responses, there are multiple examples of companies escalating responsible practices, while big-name investors have pledged to maintain their demands for accountability when it comes to ESG. This report will assess best and bad practice and explore opportunities for business and society to reimagine (and restore some trust in) capitalism for the longer term. In this special report, FT correspondents around the world provide a compelling  guide to responsible business in a crisis and the aftermath.

List and Case Studies
We compile a list and case studies of best and worst practice by management and the leadership of companies. Doing the right thing is often dictated by self-interest:  some companies with strong balance sheets are telling investors they would rather take a hit to profits than fire employees and have to hire new ones from scratch once business picks up. Gig economy businesses meanwhile are falling over themselves to offer previously-denied sick pay and other benefits to retain and expand their workforce as demand for their services soar. Some industrialists are repurposing production lines while others in particularly hard-hit sectors are firing workers with little notice. Companies are suspending share buybacks, dividend payments and big bonuses that have given capitalism a bad name, but for how long? 
 
The Board’s Role in Crisis Planning 
This crisis has shown the need for boardroom oversight of risk assessments, scenario planning and crisis response. What can directors learn from the coronavirus pandemic about their role in stress-testing their companies in advance of the next crisis? 
 
Relationship with the State
Until a Covid-19 vaccine is found, or a favourable mutation occurs, free-market economies are likely to enter a period of temporary government stewardship. What can countries learn from each other, whether in temporarily nationalising companies or directing businesses to change what their employees do, what they make or how they operate. We explore the new twist on public-private partnerships whereby companies offer their services to governments. We also examine the role of volunteerism whereby  individuals, from retired doctors, nurses and other professionals, or students whose schools are shut, donate their labour to join the frontline of the war on coronavirus.  
 
Irresponsible Business
We examine the extent of, and policy responses to, bad practice including  price-gouging and socialising losses while privatising gains” in  a crisis. 

Finance
Companies are switching away from quarterly reporting and ditching dividend payments as they focus on longer term mitigation and survival. Does the coronavirus crisis offer an opportunity to move the conversation away from quarterly guidance and short-term shareholder returns?
 
Shareholders
With bans on mass gatherings and significant distractions for management, some annual general meetings are being postponed and others conducted online, in a way that changes the focus and pressure of shareholder activism.  
 
Executive Remuneration
A number of large companies under particular financial pressures, including many airlines grounding planes and laying off staff, have announced pay cuts or suspension of salaries for CEOS, and reduced incentives for executive teams, as gestures of solidarity. We look at where this is happening and not. We scrutinise the challenge of redrawing pay plans to strike a balance between incentives and decency in a totally changed environment. We also examine the lessons from the 2008 crisis when it comes to executive pay at companies receiving bailouts.
 
Employee Welfare
Many employers are adapting to home working and having to adjust managerial culture in response to the needs of staff balancing childcare and other responsibilities outside work. How do employers also look out for employees’ mental health and psychological resilience?
 
Customers
Some companies are extending credit terms for customers struggling to operate or pay for services. A number of US health insurers have waived medical and test charges and some have extended cover to vulnerable groups such as the homeless. Some retailers are freezing prices, others are trying to prevent price-gouging on essential products. 
 
Data
An FT columnist explores the dividing line between authoritarian surveillance capitalism and socially beneficial uses of data in dealing with the public health crisis such as the one now facing the world.
 
Corporate Generosity and Kindness
Many companies and corporate foundations How generous are they are making donations of goods, time and labour. Can you quantify generosity in kind beyond ordinary corporate giving? Where does simple human kindness fit into how managers and owners should behave?    
 
Ethics 
What role should ethics play in guiding companies’ response to a crisis. We talk to executives grappling with such challenges as well as academic and legal experts. 

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Supplements and Special Reports. 
All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Tom da Costa on +44 (0)20 7873 4569, tom.dacosta@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 
Thursday 21 May 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Lawyers in a Crisis 4
Thursday 21 May 2020
Future of the Workplace - Burst 1
Friday 22 May 2020
Coronavirus and Logistics - Burst 1
Coronavirus & Logistics
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in May – June  2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):
 
Week one Friday 22 May

Drones and Logistics
How quarantined cities became a proving ground for drone services around the world.  

How can the shipping industry handle its staffing challenges amid the crisis? Coronavirus has generated significant problems for the world's shipping industry. The suspension of most international flights, the difficulties of overland travel in many places and port authorities' reluctance to let people on and off ships have made it nearly impossible for the 100,000 crew changeovers that would normally happen every month to take place. Some shipping lines and ship-owners - including Maersk, operator of the world's biggest container ship fleet - have opted to keep the same crews on board ships indefinitely, in the hope the tactic will prevent outbreaks on board ships. Others have complained such a tactic risks leaving exhausted, fatigued mariners at sea and prevents those due to join vessels from starting work. 

Week two Friday 29 May

Polish Logistics
Companies are very active across Europe - how has coronavirus affected them and what changes are likely to be permanent? 

Robots and logistics - An FT writer examines the start-ups, the winners and the losers in this space

Week three Friday 5 June 

Why have consultants been drawn into sorting out logistics in the coronavirus crisis? And what role have they played?

Case Study:  Turkish logistics in the pandemic


Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Don Janocha +1 917 551 5014, don.janocha@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


 
Friday 22 May 2020
FT Wealth 2020 - Entrepreneurs
Monday 25 May 2020
Responsible Business in a Crisis - Burst 2
Responsible Business in a Crisis
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 18 & 25 May,  & O1 June 2020.

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

With financial markets plummeting and some companies facing oblivion as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, businesses are under pressure to turn away from recent pledges of improved environmental, social and governance (ESG) performance. Yet along with each-man-for-himself responses, there are multiple examples of companies escalating responsible practices, while big-name investors have pledged to maintain their demands for accountability when it comes to ESG. This report will assess best and bad practice and explore opportunities for business and society to reimagine (and restore some trust in) capitalism for the longer term. In this special report, FT correspondents around the world provide a compelling  guide to responsible business in a crisis and the aftermath.

List and Case Studies
We compile a list and case studies of best and worst practice by management and the leadership of companies. Doing the right thing is often dictated by self-interest:  some companies with strong balance sheets are telling investors they would rather take a hit to profits than fire employees and have to hire new ones from scratch once business picks up. Gig economy businesses meanwhile are falling over themselves to offer previously-denied sick pay and other benefits to retain and expand their workforce as demand for their services soar. Some industrialists are repurposing production lines while others in particularly hard-hit sectors are firing workers with little notice. Companies are suspending share buybacks, dividend payments and big bonuses that have given capitalism a bad name, but for how long? 
 
The Board’s Role in Crisis Planning 
This crisis has shown the need for boardroom oversight of risk assessments, scenario planning and crisis response. What can directors learn from the coronavirus pandemic about their role in stress-testing their companies in advance of the next crisis? 
 
Relationship with the State
Until a Covid-19 vaccine is found, or a favourable mutation occurs, free-market economies are likely to enter a period of temporary government stewardship. What can countries learn from each other, whether in temporarily nationalising companies or directing businesses to change what their employees do, what they make or how they operate. We explore the new twist on public-private partnerships whereby companies offer their services to governments. We also examine the role of volunteerism whereby  individuals, from retired doctors, nurses and other professionals, or students whose schools are shut, donate their labour to join the frontline of the war on coronavirus.  
 
Irresponsible Business
We examine the extent of, and policy responses to, bad practice including  price-gouging and “socialising losses while privatising gains” in  a crisis. 

Finance
Companies are switching away from quarterly reporting and ditching dividend payments as they focus on longer term mitigation and survival. Does the coronavirus crisis offer an opportunity to move the conversation away from quarterly guidance and short-term shareholder returns?
 
Shareholders
With bans on mass gatherings and significant distractions for management, some annual general meetings are being postponed and others conducted online, in a way that changes the focus and pressure of shareholder activism.  
 
Executive Remuneration
A number of large companies under particular financial pressures, including many airlines grounding planes and laying off staff, have announced pay cuts or suspension of salaries for CEOS, and reduced incentives for executive teams, as gestures of solidarity. We look at where this is happening and not. We scrutinise the challenge of redrawing pay plans to strike a balance between incentives and decency in a totally changed environment. We also examine the lessons from the 2008 crisis when it comes to executive pay at companies receiving bailouts.
 
Employee Welfare
Many employers are adapting to home working and having to adjust managerial culture in response to the needs of staff balancing childcare and other responsibilities outside work. How do employers also look out for employees’ mental health and psychological resilience?
 
Customers
Some companies are extending credit terms for customers struggling to operate or pay for services. A number of US health insurers have waived medical and test charges and some have extended cover to vulnerable groups such as the homeless. Some retailers are freezing prices, others are trying to prevent price-gouging on essential products. 
 
Data
An FT columnist explores the dividing line between authoritarian surveillance capitalism and socially beneficial uses of data in dealing with the public health crisis such as the one now facing the world.
 
Corporate Generosity and Kindness
Many companies and corporate foundations How generous are they are making donations of goods, time and labour. Can you quantify generosity in kind beyond ordinary corporate giving? Where does simple human kindness fit into how managers and owners should behave?    
 
Ethics 
What role should ethics play in guiding companies’ response to a crisis. We talk to executives grappling with such challenges as well as academic and legal experts. 

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Supplements and Special Reports. 
All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Tom da Costa on +44 (0)20 7873 4569, tom.dacosta@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 
Thursday 28 May 2020
Trade Secrets: Supply Chain Disruption
Thursday 28 May 2020
Future of the Workplace - Burst 2
Friday 29 May 2020
Coronavirus and Logistics - Burst 2
Coronavirus & Logistics
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in May – June  2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):
 
Week one Friday 22 May

Drones and Logistics
How quarantined cities became a proving ground for drone services around the world.  

How can the shipping industry handle its staffing challenges amid the crisis? Coronavirus has generated significant problems for the world's shipping industry. The suspension of most international flights, the difficulties of overland travel in many places and port authorities' reluctance to let people on and off ships have made it nearly impossible for the 100,000 crew changeovers that would normally happen every month to take place. Some shipping lines and ship-owners - including Maersk, operator of the world's biggest container ship fleet - have opted to keep the same crews on board ships indefinitely, in the hope the tactic will prevent outbreaks on board ships. Others have complained such a tactic risks leaving exhausted, fatigued mariners at sea and prevents those due to join vessels from starting work. 

Week two Friday 29 May

Polish Logistics
Companies are very active across Europe - how has coronavirus affected them and what changes are likely to be permanent? 

Robots and logistics - An FT writer examines the start-ups, the winners and the losers in this space

Week three Friday 5 June 

Why have consultants been drawn into sorting out logistics in the coronavirus crisis? And what role have they played?

Case Study:  Turkish logistics in the pandemic


Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Don Janocha +1 917 551 5014, don.janocha@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


 
Monday 01 Jun 2020
Responsible Business in a Crisis - Burst 3
Responsible Business in a Crisis
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 18 & 25 May,  & O1 June 2020.

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

With financial markets plummeting and some companies facing oblivion as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, businesses are under pressure to turn away from recent pledges of improved environmental, social and governance (ESG) performance. Yet along with each-man-for-himself responses, there are multiple examples of companies escalating responsible practices, while big-name investors have pledged to maintain their demands for accountability when it comes to ESG. This report will assess best and bad practice and explore opportunities for business and society to reimagine (and restore some trust in) capitalism for the longer term. In this special report, FT correspondents around the world provide a compelling  guide to responsible business in a crisis and the aftermath.

List and Case Studies
We compile a list and case studies of best and worst practice by management and the leadership of companies. Doing the right thing is often dictated by self-interest:  some companies with strong balance sheets are telling investors they would rather take a hit to profits than fire employees and have to hire new ones from scratch once business picks up. Gig economy businesses meanwhile are falling over themselves to offer previously-denied sick pay and other benefits to retain and expand their workforce as demand for their services soar. Some industrialists are repurposing production lines while others in particularly hard-hit sectors are firing workers with little notice. Companies are suspending share buybacks, dividend payments and big bonuses that have given capitalism a bad name, but for how long? 
 
The Board’s Role in Crisis Planning 
This crisis has shown the need for boardroom oversight of risk assessments, scenario planning and crisis response. What can directors learn from the coronavirus pandemic about their role in stress-testing their companies in advance of the next crisis? 
 
Relationship with the State
Until a Covid-19 vaccine is found, or a favourable mutation occurs, free-market economies are likely to enter a period of temporary government stewardship. What can countries learn from each other, whether in temporarily nationalising companies or directing businesses to change what their employees do, what they make or how they operate. We explore the new twist on public-private partnerships whereby companies offer their services to governments. We also examine the role of volunteerism whereby  individuals, from retired doctors, nurses and other professionals, or students whose schools are shut, donate their labour to join the frontline of the war on coronavirus.  
 
Irresponsible Business
We examine the extent of, and policy responses to, bad practice including  price-gouging and “socialising losses while privatising gains” in  a crisis. 

Finance
Companies are switching away from quarterly reporting and ditching dividend payments as they focus on longer term mitigation and survival. Does the coronavirus crisis offer an opportunity to move the conversation away from quarterly guidance and short-term shareholder returns?
 
Shareholders
With bans on mass gatherings and significant distractions for management, some annual general meetings are being postponed and others conducted online, in a way that changes the focus and pressure of shareholder activism.  
 
Executive Remuneration
A number of large companies under particular financial pressures, including many airlines grounding planes and laying off staff, have announced pay cuts or suspension of salaries for CEOS, and reduced incentives for executive teams, as gestures of solidarity. We look at where this is happening and not. We scrutinise the challenge of redrawing pay plans to strike a balance between incentives and decency in a totally changed environment. We also examine the lessons from the 2008 crisis when it comes to executive pay at companies receiving bailouts.
 
Employee Welfare
Many employers are adapting to home working and having to adjust managerial culture in response to the needs of staff balancing childcare and other responsibilities outside work. How do employers also look out for employees’ mental health and psychological resilience?
 
Customers
Some companies are extending credit terms for customers struggling to operate or pay for services. A number of US health insurers have waived medical and test charges and some have extended cover to vulnerable groups such as the homeless. Some retailers are freezing prices, others are trying to prevent price-gouging on essential products. 
 
Data
An FT columnist explores the dividing line between authoritarian surveillance capitalism and socially beneficial uses of data in dealing with the public health crisis such as the one now facing the world.
 
Corporate Generosity and Kindness
Many companies and corporate foundations How generous are they are making donations of goods, time and labour. Can you quantify generosity in kind beyond ordinary corporate giving? Where does simple human kindness fit into how managers and owners should behave?    
 
Ethics 
What role should ethics play in guiding companies’ response to a crisis. We talk to executives grappling with such challenges as well as academic and legal experts. 

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Supplements and Special Reports. 
All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

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Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 
Thursday 04 Jun 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Lawyers in a Crisis 5
Thursday 04 Jun 2020
Future of the Workplace - Burst 3
Friday 05 Jun 2020
Coronavirus and Logistics - Burst 3
Coronavirus & Logistics
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in May – June  2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):
 
Week one Friday 22 May

Drones and Logistics
How quarantined cities became a proving ground for drone services around the world.  

How can the shipping industry handle its staffing challenges amid the crisis? Coronavirus has generated significant problems for the world's shipping industry. The suspension of most international flights, the difficulties of overland travel in many places and port authorities' reluctance to let people on and off ships have made it nearly impossible for the 100,000 crew changeovers that would normally happen every month to take place. Some shipping lines and ship-owners - including Maersk, operator of the world's biggest container ship fleet - have opted to keep the same crews on board ships indefinitely, in the hope the tactic will prevent outbreaks on board ships. Others have complained such a tactic risks leaving exhausted, fatigued mariners at sea and prevents those due to join vessels from starting work. 

Week two Friday 29 May

Polish Logistics
Companies are very active across Europe - how has coronavirus affected them and what changes are likely to be permanent? 

Robots and logistics - An FT writer examines the start-ups, the winners and the losers in this space

Week three Friday 5 June 

Why have consultants been drawn into sorting out logistics in the coronavirus crisis? And what role have they played?

Case Study:  Turkish logistics in the pandemic


Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

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Don Janocha +1 917 551 5014, don.janocha@ft.com

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Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


 
Friday 05 Jun 2020
China Green Finance
China Green Finance
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in June 05th, 2020.


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

China’s Green Bond Market:  How green is green? What does good look like? 

China’s Emissions Trading PlanWe look at the latest developments 

Interview with senior policymaker in the sector 

Belt and Road Finance in China may be becoming increasingly green-focused, but is this also the case for its investments abroad? The Belt and Road Initiative is spending billions of dollars in emerging economies - are these projects green focused, and what are the repercussions if they are not?

Disclosure 
The Shanghai and Shenzhen stock exchanges are expected to require all companies to disclose certain environmental information this year. What companies are disclosing environmental information the best? What does the average/ median company disclosures look like? What is the government doing to encourage environmental disclosures?

Beijing planning for Olympics of 2022


Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.
All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Olivia Hu + 86 21 6375 9222 ext. 121, olivia.hu@ftchinese.com
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or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 
Friday 12 Jun 2020
Collecting: Art in Europe 1
Monday 15 Jun 2020
Business Education 2020 (4) - Financial Training

Business Education: Financial Training

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on 15 June, 2020
We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Introduction

The masters in finance is becoming an increasingly popular degree among both students and corporate recruiters, but it needs to adapt to changing times. Applications grew in 2019 year-over-year, while MBA demand fell, according to GMAC. This has encouraged several leading schools to launch master in finance programmes in recent years. We look at what is driving this demand and the challenges ahead for the course.

Rankings, Data, Analysis 

What does this year’s latest FT ranking of masters in finance courses tell us about trends in the market? Plus an explanation of the criteria for a place in the list.

Business School Focus

Profile of one of the schools that has moved up the rankings this year, assessing what it has done to improve its position globally. The piece will look at what good schools in general are doing to adapt to a changing world and changes in demand for masters in finance degrees.

Coronavirus 

What impact will the coronavirus crisis have on financial training and how financial managers are taught at business schools to manage in an extreme crisis.  

Online Education 

Not many masters in finance programmes are currently delivered digitally, but the coronavirus crisis, as well as a greater need for flexibility amid fast changes in finance, is altering this state of affairs rapidly, with more schools launching online masters in finance degrees.

Sustainable Finance 

Over the past year, investors have poured money into stocks and portfolios with an ESG (environmental, social, and governance) focus. Evidence shows they perform well and may even weather global crises such as the coronavirus better than other funds. The challenge, however, is navigating a maze of different metrics and standards for measuring the impact of ESG investments. Given the growing prominence of ESG in the financial sector, how are financial training courses 

approaching this?

Entrepreneurship 

A case study of a business founded by a masters in finance graduate, explaining why they struck out on their own and how their formal education at business school helped them overcome their challenges, even in a crisis like the  coronavirus pandemic..

Added Value

Business schools are bolting on stackable industry certifications like the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) to their masters in finance degrees. The aim is to give their graduates an edge on the job market and a head start on some of the world’s toughest exams. 

Careers

What can graduates do to prepare for the impending changes in the jobs market in the wake of coronavirus and what skills will be in most demand to ensure a career for future? This piece gives an overview of career opportunities available to masters in finance graduates, where jobs are growing and what skills are most in demand. 

Information

■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:
Gemma Taylor +44 (0)20 7873 3698, gemma.taylor@ft.com

Rachel Spence +44 (0)20 7873 3290, rachel.spence@ft.com

Jackie King +1 917 551 5113, jackie.king@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

 

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

Wednesday 17 Jun 2020
Investing in Serbia
Wednesday 17 Jun 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Lawyers in a Crisis 6
Thursday 18 Jun 2020
Investing in Serbia
Thursday 18 Jun 2020
Europes Leading Patent Law Firms

Europe's Leading Patent Law Firms


The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on June 18th, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


How China’s failed attempt in backing of a candidate to lead the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), amid a trade war with the US, has provoked controversy over the replacement of the sitting director-general


The UK has reversed its position and threatened to withdraw from plans to create a European unified patent court. Where does that leave plans for the organisation aimed at simplified the sector across the continent?


The Human Touch

Recent judgments have rejected claims that AI machines can be deemed as inventors of patents. How long can this contested position hold?


Patents and Charities

When companies work with non-profits or foundations on innovations, what rules and policies should apply to who owns that IP?


University Challenge

What are the problems facing educational institutions, which are often the incubators of new ideas in tech, medicine and science, in managing their IP? What happens when companies spin-off from a campus pilot?


Case Study

A profile of how a company employing large numbers of patent attorneys in-house handles its resources


Could do Better

An EU report published in January has highlighted the scale and major causes of losses that result from breaches in IP across the trading bloc


Europe's Leading Patent Law Firms - a ranking by county and broad sectoral expertise



Information


Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Sarah Mohr on +44 (0)20 7873 3195, sarah.mohr@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


Thursday 25 Jun 2020
Sustainable Food and Agriculture 2 (Single Sponsor)
Friday 26 Jun 2020
FT Wealth 2020 - June
Friday 26 Jun 2020
Innovative Lawyers: FT General Counsel
Saturday 27 Jun 2020
Art of Fashion- Jewellery Special
Tuesday 30 Jun 2020
Energy Transition
Wednesday 01 Jul 2020
AI & Robotics
AI & Robotics
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over July, 01st, 2020

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

AI/ Robotics and Remote Working
The Covid-19 pandemic has resulted in an army of homeworkers. With uncertainty over future lockdowns, homeworking is likely to become more commonplace. How can AI and robotics assist homeworkers and what are their repercussions for business?

AI-finance and the Rise of the Robot
The use of AI in financial services is growing fast, as more services and advice becomes automated. Traditional finance companies are introducing more automated and AI-based services in response to heightened competition from fintechs. How will AI and automation change financial services over the next decade? What will it mean for consumers and banks?

AI’s Quest to Limit Human Interaction to Tackle Covid-19
Robots are playing a role in the battle against Covid-19. Autonomous robots carry medication and food through hospitals, disinfect public areas and are used by doctors to treat coronavirus patients. How can robotic advances prompted by the Covid-19 outbreak be utilised in other areas?

Can Robots Help Farmers Overcome Staffing Problems?
With the harvest looming, the UK's farms are struggling to find sufficient staff due to the coronavirus. The problem is acute for fruit and vegetable farms, which rely heavily on physical labour. Can robots step in to fill the gap? What repercussions will these advances have for the future?

Environmental Robotics:
How Robotics are Joining the Fight to Save the Environment
Technology is increasingly being harnessed to help preserve the environment, with AI used to monitor at-risk coral reefs, and to collect and classify marine populations. Robots are used to clean the oceans, AI is used to monitor elephant populations, and robot disassemblers extract valuable metals from expensive technologies for recycling. Can AI & robotics turn the tide in the fight for the planet?

Robotics R&D Efforts Confront the 'Last Mile'.
Developers are focusing on the subtler elements of robotic functionality that allow more flexible and nimble movements, and the ability to change shape and adapt to physical surroundings. What industries can benefit from such technology?

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Kirsty Newman on +44 (0)20 7873 4984, kirsty.newman@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 
Thursday 02 Jul 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Lawyers in a Crisis 7
Monday 06 Jul 2020
FT - e-Mobility Smart Transportation
Wednesday 08 Jul 2020
Rethinking Energy
Thursday 16 Jul 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Asia-Pacific
Thursday 16 Jul 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Lawyers in a Crisis 8
Thursday 23 Jul 2020
Japan and Sustainability

Japan and Sustainability

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report July 24th, 2020.


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Sport and Climate Change

Extreme weather conditions are increasingly threatening sport. Be it football pitches too waterlogged to play, or famous seaside golf courses crashing into the sea. What are the ways in which the 2020 Olympics and sport in general plan to adapt to climate change?


Video

Climate change effect on Olympics: Tokyo has already relocated the Olympic marathon event to rural northern Japan to avoid extreme heat concerns. The outdoor swimming events might be moving too. 


Infrastructure

Big sporting events are increasingly trying to work out how to have more sustainable events. We look at how this thinking has influenced the 2020 Olympics as a variety of sports have made efforts to become more sustainable - and we ask whether they are moving fast enough?


Activism

Activist investors have invested in several Japanese companies and in some cases forced corporate changes. How much does this signal a new readiness by Japanese groups to respond to shareholder demands? Is this a long-awaited investment opportunity. Will this facilitate or hinder some investors’ new emphasis on sustainability and ESG considerations? 

 

Sustainable Development Goals

We look at ways in which Japanese business has incorporated SDGs into their products and operations

Overview plus case studies from an investor and a manufacturer

 

Greenwash or Green Reporting?

An op-ed from a leading investor on Japanese progress when it comes to “greening” companies’ reporting and disclosure requirements.

 

Interview with an Advocate of More Sustainable Business and Finance 

What needs to happen to deepen the ability of Japanese business to create value in a sustainable manner.

 

Professional Services Firms

We look at the role played by accountants and law firms in Japan in driving or hindering progress towards more sustainable business practices



Information


Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Hiroko Hoshino +81 3 5219 2345, hiroko.hoshino@ft.com

Kazue Hasegawa +81 3 5219 2324, kazue.hasegawa@ft.com

Sunny Ningsun +81 90 3207 7568, sunny.ningsun@ft.com

Tomoko Asanuma +81 3 5219 2323, tomoko.asanuma@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Thursday 30 Jul 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Lawyers in a Crisis 9
Thursday 30 Jul 2020
FT 300: Top Registered Investment Advisers
Thursday 13 Aug 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Lawyers in a Crisis 10
Saturday 22 Aug 2020
Collecting: Venice Biennale
Thursday 27 Aug 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Lawyers in a Crisis 11
Saturday 29 Aug 2020
Art of Fashion AW20
Tuesday 01 Sep 2020
World Economy
World Economy
The Covid-19 Crisis


The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over September 01st, 2020

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Overview
The Covid-19 Crisis is reshaping the world economy in the short run and is quite likely to transform it in the longer run, too. It has come unexpectedly, a little over a decade after the worst of the global financial crisis. It has hit a world economy that was still struggling with the financial, economic and political aftermath of that crisis, in the form of feeble productivity growth, ultra-low interest rates, debt overhangs, slowing growth of world trade, protectionism and the rise of populism and nationalism. As Covid-19 has spread across the world, it has brought flight from risky assets, financial turbulence, huge central-bank interventions, shutdowns of economies, collapsed output, mass unemployment, a wave of bankruptcies, an almost-complete cessation of cross-border travel, huge increases in public spending and fiscal deficits and debt, political stresses and a sharp further deterioration in international relations, especially between China and the US. We have entered into an essentially unprecedented and dangerous new world.

Managing the Pandemic
Much depends on progress with managing the disease. So, what have learned so far about its impact, in terms of infections and fatalities? Are we likely to find a cure or a vaccine? Is it possible to keep the disease suppressed over long period or do we have to reconcile ourselves to its continued spread? How does one manage a wold economy in which some countries have suppressed the disease and others have let it spread freely? If a vaccine is found, how easy will it be to manufacture, distribute and deliver it across the globe? How will it be paid for?

Economics of Covid-19
The Covid-19 economic crisis has not affected economies uniformly. It has hit some economies far harder than others and, within societies, it hits some sectors, mostly those dependent on face-to-face interactions and the ability to travel freely, and some segments of the population, mostly the young and the less skilled, far more heavily than others. This is the natural result of “social distancing”, some of it voluntary and some of it enforced by governments. This has given rise to a lively, emotional and divisive debate on whether there exists a trade-off between preserving health and protecting the economy.  Yet what also matters is that this trade-off differs across countries, with the economic costs of a shutdown greater in poorer countries, but the health costs of the disease lower in countries with more youthful populations. 

Winning and Losing Business Sectors
Some sectors have been far worse-hit than others. So, what does Covid-19 mean for the present and future state of tourism and air travel or conventional retail? And what have been the gains for the digital economy, especially big tech and companies specialising in digital conferencing, such as Zoom. Has Covid-19 accelerated our ways of working and living by a decade? Or will we go back to the way it was before once the pandemic is over.

Future of Globalisation
Globalisation was under pressure even before the Covid-19 crisis. But the immediate impact has been a crash in world trade and movement of people. Again, outright protectionism has also been growing strongly, most prominently in the US under Donald Trump, which has launched trade wars against all its leading trade partners. Brexit has also now happened. But the ultimate trade deal has not yet been negotiated. It looks increasingly as though there will be none. But most important of all is the rising friction among China, the US and the EU and especially between China, on the one hand, and the US and EU, on the other. The future of world trade is very much at risk. 

End Game for Brexit
What will be the outcome for the post-Brexit deal with the EU. If there is no deal, what might that mean for the British economy and so the prospects for recovery from the Covid-19 crisis? Which sectors will be most adversely affected by the outcome and which might thrive?

Future of Global Finance
The Covid-19 crisis also created huge turmoil in financial markets and a pervasive flight from risk. This led to unprecedented responses by central banks, especially the Federal Reserve. But it has left a number of borrowers, especially in emerging economies, very vulnerable. What are the likely effects of this financial shock? Will there be a wave of bankruptcies and, if so, what effects might these have? Is the banking system now strong enough to cope? How are sovereign defaults being handled and how many more might emerge? Are the International Monetary Fund and other International Financial Institutions able to cope?

Fiscal Future Post-Covid-19
Far more than in the global financial crisis, central banks have not been alone this time. The scale of the fiscal response to the Covid-19 crisis has been enormous, across the world. How have the support policies been designed and which seem to be working best? In the longer term, will the fiscal and monetary policies used during the crisis inevitably lead to higher inflation? Will there be outright fiscal defaults? Or will there be a long period of financial “repression”, with limits imposed on interest rates and even exchange controls.

Crisis of the Eurozone
A big issue is the massive renewed stresses on the eurozone created by deep depressions, huge fiscal deficits and divergent mortality rates, all coming after what was a lost decade for a number of member countries, especially Italy. The European Central Bank has emerged as the key player, given the refusal to accept much in the way of fiscal solidarity. But even its ability to act is being constrained by decisions of the German Constitutional Court. So, will the eurozone survive at all and, if so, how?

Long-run Consequences of the Covid-19 Crisis
How might the world economy look five years from now? Let’s take a crystal ball to globalisation, productivity, inflation, defaults, bankruptcies, the new structure of the economy, employment, unemployment and so forth. What will be different from what it was before and what will end up more or less the same?


Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Charlotte Morgan +44 (0) 20 7775 6822, charlotte.morgan@ft.com
Petra Harkay +44 (0) 20 7775 6815, petra.harkay@ft.com
Ben Tobin +44 (0) 20 7775 6615, ben.tobin@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 
Friday 04 Sep 2020
FT Wealth 2020 - Sept
Saturday 05 Sep 2020
Watches & Jewellery - September
Monday 07 Sep 2020
Europe s Start-ups

Europe’s Start-Ups

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in

digital on 08th June 2020 and in print on 11 June 2020.


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


The FT and Sifted, working with the Founders’ Forum, present a special report on Europe’s tech founders and start-ups; the people, the businesses, the landscape. (this list is provisional and may be modified)


The List: Europe’s Top 50 Founders

This list is drawn from Sifted’s existing directory of Europe’s 100 top start-ups, based on the money they have raised, how quickly they have hired and how formative they have been for the start-up ecosystem. 


This includes a lot of the most well-known names in European tech, such as N26, UIPath, Monzo, Revolut, Deliveroo, Glovo, Flixbus, Blablacar and so on. A large proportion of these are valued at more than $1bn, so these are substantial businesses making a difference in Europe’s economy.

 

From the above list, a panel of judges chooses a key founder for each of the last 15 years. A short profile puts the company and founder in the context of other things going on at the time, for example, a company founded during the financial crisis, or after Brexit, a sustainability-focused company that responded to the climate-crisis etc.  


The List: Top 50 to Follow List

We look at less well-known names: companies that have raised a Series A funding round (ie they have just raised their first serious VC backing) and which are hiring at the fastest rate, using the hiring as a proxy for growth. These are the challenger companies potentially destined to be Europe’s next set of tech unicorns, all with interesting stories behind them.

 

Introduction: Rise of European start-ups and founders, and what does the future hold


Infographics: Top Investments per sector / country / city since 2000 


Brief Analysis of Numbers

How many founders are female or from a minority background, for example. 


A timeline of the biggest moments in European Tech since 2000 


The EU tech ecosystems of the future: Estonia, Poland, Lisbon etc


Angel investors: Their place in ecosystem; why they matter

Stories informed by what the list and data tell us about the concerns and preoccupations of modern Europe - and how they are changing, with some case studies and profiles:


-         AI start-ups

Artificial intelligence has been a watchword in tech for some time. But what can the latest start-ups in the field tell us about the way AI is being applied — and what are the limits?  How are some start-ups moving beyond machine learning? 


-         Sustainability Start-ups

There are many of them but are any having much of an impact when it comes to tackling climate change


-         Health Tech in areas such as Longevity and Genomics

Are apps and start-ups filling a gap in health service provision.    


-        Europe as Birthplace of Fintech


-        Role of Regulation in opening up some opportunities and closing down others


Information


Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Nick Eyles on +44 (0)20 7873 3613, nick.eyles@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Wednesday 09 Sep 2020
FT - e-Mobility Smart Transportation
Wednesday 09 Sep 2020
E-Mobility Smart Transportation
Thursday 10 Sep 2020
Europe s Start-ups

Europe’s Start-Ups

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in

digital on 08th June 2020 and in print on 11 June 2020.


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


The FT and Sifted, working with the Founders’ Forum, present a special report on Europe’s tech founders and start-ups; the people, the businesses, the landscape. (this list is provisional and may be modified)


The List: Europe’s Top 50 Founders

This list is drawn from Sifted’s existing directory of Europe’s 100 top start-ups, based on the money they have raised, how quickly they have hired and how formative they have been for the start-up ecosystem. 


This includes a lot of the most well-known names in European tech, such as N26, UIPath, Monzo, Revolut, Deliveroo, Glovo, Flixbus, Blablacar and so on. A large proportion of these are valued at more than $1bn, so these are substantial businesses making a difference in Europe’s economy.

 

From the above list, a panel of judges chooses a key founder for each of the last 15 years. A short profile puts the company and founder in the context of other things going on at the time, for example, a company founded during the financial crisis, or after Brexit, a sustainability-focused company that responded to the climate-crisis etc.  


The List: Top 50 to Follow List

We look at less well-known names: companies that have raised a Series A funding round (ie they have just raised their first serious VC backing) and which are hiring at the fastest rate, using the hiring as a proxy for growth. These are the challenger companies potentially destined to be Europe’s next set of tech unicorns, all with interesting stories behind them.

 

Introduction: Rise of European start-ups and founders, and what does the future hold


Infographics: Top Investments per sector / country / city since 2000 


Brief Analysis of Numbers

How many founders are female or from a minority background, for example. 


A timeline of the biggest moments in European Tech since 2000 


The EU tech ecosystems of the future: Estonia, Poland, Lisbon etc


Angel investors: Their place in ecosystem; why they matter

Stories informed by what the list and data tell us about the concerns and preoccupations of modern Europe - and how they are changing, with some case studies and profiles:


-         AI start-ups

Artificial intelligence has been a watchword in tech for some time. But what can the latest start-ups in the field tell us about the way AI is being applied — and what are the limits?  How are some start-ups moving beyond machine learning? 


-         Sustainability Start-ups

There are many of them but are any having much of an impact when it comes to tackling climate change


-         Health Tech in areas such as Longevity and Genomics

Are apps and start-ups filling a gap in health service provision.    


-        Europe as Birthplace of Fintech


-        Role of Regulation in opening up some opportunities and closing down others


Information


Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Nick Eyles on +44 (0)20 7873 3613, nick.eyles@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



Saturday 12 Sep 2020
Collecting: Art in Europe 2
Tuesday 15 Sep 2020
Assessing the SDG s / Global Goals
Wednesday 16 Sep 2020
Luxembourg as a Financial Centre

Luxembourg as a Financial Centre

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in 2020

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

What Brexit means for Luxembourg:
  •   In terms of relocations of financial services activities
  •   What happens to the Brits living in the Grand Duchy
  •   Other impacts on Luxembourg

What role does Luxembourg play in sustainable finance

Interview with a leading policymaker 

Interview with a business leader

What happened to the tax haven label?
How Luxembourg is adapting to the new OECD and EU tax rules

How Luxembourg is preparing the digital future of its financial industry

Luxembourg as a renminbi hub
Luxembourg’s financial services relations with China and how they compare to UK’s

An Expat Guide to Luxembourg
What it’s like to live in the Grand Duchy Luxembourg recently became the first country to make its public transport free in order to ease congestion. What else is different about life in Luxembourg?

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Stefan de Muynck +352 691 635989, stefan.de.muynck@financialtimes.lu 

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



 
Monday 21 Sep 2020
FTfm Special: ETFs 2
Monday 21 Sep 2020
Business Education: Asian Business Schools
Monday 21 Sep 2020
Investing in the New Madagascar
Monday 21 Sep 2020
FT Health: Cell Therapies - Part 1
FT Health: Cell Therapies
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report 31 January, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Definition: Gene therapy involves the transfer of genetic material, usually in a carrier or vector, and the uptake of the gene into the appropriate cells of the body. Cell therapy involves the transfer of cells with the relevant function into the patient.

Regulation
There are some real differences in how the industry is regulated around the world. Spotlight on Japan where deregulation five years ago has led to the country becoming a real focus of innovation with many stem-cell clinics and interest from foreign companies. US regulators on the other hand are trying to clamp down on things like DIY gene therapy.

Plus

Op-ed:  A leading industry voice talks on regulation and ethics

Science
How lab science can be turned into treatments.
Timeline of key developments since the 1940s.
Latest thinking in areas such as immunotherapy

Applications
The fight against cancer - especially in children - is the most promising potential application so far, but what other diseases could be treated?

Spotlight on China:   A flood of investment is creating a Car-T boom in China

Payment and Access
How will health systems pay for these new therapies? Will they be out of bounds for poorer countries? And how will hospitals cope? Will changes be needed in primary and secondary care? Will we need more specialist hospital wards, diagnostic units, oncologists and geneticists?

Manufacturing and Supply Chains
A look at the main players after a surge of related M&A activity this year. The made-to-order nature of cell therapies means a very different type of supply chain.

Future challenges?

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Ian Edwards +44 (0)20 7873 3272, ian.edwards@ft.com
Caitlin O’Sullivan +44 (0)20 7873 3743, caitlin.osullivan@ft.com
or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.
 
Monday 21 Sep 2020
Investing in the Western Balkans
Investing in the
Western Balkans
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report in September 2020

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional)


Companies
FT correspondents look at some of the most innovative and fast growing companies in the western Balkans.

Tech
Serbia’s population is shrinking by 37,000 people annually, with 30,000 of those emigrating abroad, mostly to the EU. But the country has a robust start up scene, and a local start-up hub Startit became the first European accelerator to be part of a Google accelerator, Startup Launchpad. The government has created a plan to invest €65m in science and technology centers and the same amount in new computers and technology for schools.

Foreign Investment
We look at the environment for foreign investors in the western Balkans

Tourism
Croatia and Slovenia, once new territory for travellers, are now considered well-discovered, and even at times, too full of tourists. But the other former Yugoslav countries and Albania have been experiencing a steady and sustainable tourism boom in the last five years. Between 2013 and 2016, nights spent by foreign visitors rose by more than 10pct each year in five Western Balkan countries: Albania, Bosnia Herzegovina, Serbia, Kosovo and Romania. There are still significant challenges -- many of the countries still face rule of law issues that could deter potential luxury investors. Furthermore, some links between countries have been left unimproved since Yugoslav times. But there are some bright spots: there are several new cross-border hiking and cycling routes.

Coal
The Balkans have not been able to quit coal. Two countries have recently announced new lines of credit to pay for new coal-fired power plants. Yet, according to the Energy community, all of the coal-fired power plants would be bankrupt by now if the countries were in the EU.Coal energy is inexpensive but the government is subsidizing it -- and pouring money that could be used on renewable sources into the power plants and into servicing the debt for new plants. (One irony is that most of the coal-fired electricity generated in the Western Balkans is exported to the EU, because it is cheaper due to the fact that the governments are not bound by EU carbon taxes.) How secure is the energy future of the countries in the Balkans? What will happen if the countries, as recommended, introduce an emissions tax? EU aspirants are asked to produce 20 percent of electricity with renewable sources by 2020 and 30 percent by 2032. Is that target achievable in the Balkans? Many of the governments have looked to small hydro as a solution -- is it feasible and at what cost to the environment?

Serbia -- Joining Russia-led Free Trade Zone, Pivoting to China
On October 25, Serbia, which aims to join the EU, is set to sign a free trade agreement with the Moscow-backed Eurasian Economic Union. The country, which was recently named as the number one recipient of greenfield investment per capita, has also received a lot of investment from China. As an EU aspirant, Serbia must align its foreign policy and investment rules to the bloc, but the transitioning country seems unready to turn away investments from China, Russia, and elsewhere that Brussels is wary of. In the past decade, Chinese companies have bought or invested in assets worth at least $318bn, making Serbia a key recipient of its Belt and Road project. The Chinese are constructing a railway from the capital Belgrade to Budapest, recently bought a large steelworks (formerly owned by US steel), a copper mine, and a power plant. Huawei is also working on surveillance projects and is making inroads in the telekom sector. How is Serbia balancing its EU aspirations with its need to develop industry that has needed significant investment since the collapse of Yugoslavia? This could also double as an interview with the president or PM. 

North Macedonia Bets on Medical Marijuana
This might be a bit unorthodox, but recently renamed North Macedonia legalised growing cannabis for medical purposes in 2016 and is now contemplating amending the law to allow its export. The health minister recently told Reuters that the country expects the marijuana industry to generate at least one per cent of GDP.

Companies Operating in Legally-complicated Kosovo
What is it like doing business in Kosovo, which fought a bitter war with Serbia in 1998-99, declared independence in 2008, but still remains unrecognised by 5 EU members, global powers like Russia and China, and of course, Serbia?



Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Supplements and Special Reports.
All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Stefan de Muynck +352 691 635989, stefan.de.muynck@financialtimes.lu 
Robert Grange +44 (0)20 7873 4418, robert.grange@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.




 
 
 
 
Tuesday 22 Sep 2020
Ghana & the New Economy
Ghana & the New Economy
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over November 06th, 2019


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Introduction

Ghana is set to be the fastest growing economy in the world this year, according to the World Bank and IMF, a remarkable transformation of a country that was on the brink of economic collapse just a few decades ago. This piece examines how the west African country achieved the turnaround and what it plans to do with this growth

Interview with President or Vice President

Ease of Doing Business

This piece explores how the country has become a leader in ease of doing business in this part of Africa by looking at the policies it has put in place and how they’ve been used by business across various sectors, along with what more needs to be done.

Tech Ecosystem Overview

Ghana’s startup scene is small but thriving. This piece takes a look at the most promising young companies, from healthcare to fintech. 

How Oil Will Transform Ghana’s Economy

The discovery of significant oil deposits is the main engine driving the economic boom in Ghana. This piece explores how the country plans to harness its newfound oil wealth, where investment is flowing in (and from where) and how it plans to avoid the pitfalls of its neighbours who have fallen victim to the resource curse.

Gollywood and the New Economy

While not nearly as big as Nigeria’s Nollywood, Ghana’s film industry punches far above its weight. This piece looks at how Gollywood is navigating the digital transformation of the movie business.

How Fibre is Transforming Small Business

We look at an initiative to put fibre broadband in a country where internet speeds remain slow. It has the potential to transform how everyone from SMEs to large companies operate.

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Mark Carwardine: +44 (0)20 7873 4880, mark.carwardine@ft.com

Larry Kenney: +44 (0)20 7873 4835, larry.kenney@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.



 
Wednesday 23 Sep 2020
Investing in Energy
Thursday 24 Sep 2020
The Business of Charity
Thursday 24 Sep 2020
Sustainable Food and Agriculture 3 (Single Sponsor)
Saturday 26 Sep 2020
Collecting: Design Art
Monday 28 Sep 2020
Business Education 2020 (5) - Masters in Management
Wednesday 30 Sep 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Europe
Wednesday 30 Sep 2020
Cyber Security
Wednesday 30 Sep 2020
Global Brands
Thursday 01 Oct 2020
The Future of AI & Digital Healthcare (Single Sponsor)
Thursday 01 Oct 2020
New Trade Routes: Arab World
Thursday 01 Oct 2020
Nigeria at 60

Spclrprts


Nigeria at 60

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over October 1st, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional


Intro: We take a look at Nigeria sixty years after independence, as Africa’s biggest crude producer attempts to diversify its economy away from oil production amid a global oil slump, manage a major recession and provide for its growing, largely impoverished population of 200m.


-Economy: With the price of oil hovering right around the cost of producing a barrel in Nigeria, Africa’s largest economy is bracing for its second recession in five years with pain likely to ripple throughout the country. The government, which derives over half of its revenues and nearly all of its foreign exchange from crude oil, has already slashed its budget. More belt tightening is likely on the way - but the crisis also provides a clear opportunity for the Buhari administration to enact long-awaited structural reforms.


-Oil & Gas: We explore how the oil price crash is likely to affect IOCs, major projects and domestic players in Nigeria’s most important industries.


-Coronavirus: Medical supplies flown in from China on private planes, isolation centres built on football stadium pitches, mobile PCR testing labs delivered to remote regions. We examine the private sector response to the pandemic, which acted as a backstop to the Nigerian government.


-Interview with a prominent Nigerian businessperson.


-Governors - We speak to two governors - one from the north and one from the south - about the challenges facing their states and the opportunities they see on the horizon. 


-Banking - We assess the likely impact of the oil crash on the Nigerian banking sector, which is heavily exposed to domestic oil companies that account for roughly 30 per cent of banks’ lending.


-Manufacturing: The Buhari administration’s efforts to diversify the economy has had mixed results. The manufacturing sector in particular remains weak - we explore the challenges it faces and whether the need for domestic production revealed by coronavirus pandemic will spur a resurgence.


-Healthcare: Nigeria’s hospital system is notoriously patchy, and the country has one of the lowest per capita rates of healthcare spending in the world. The system has not so far been overwhelmed by the pandemic, but will investments being made now to cope with coronavirus create meaningful change for its future?


-Agriculture: The jewel of the Buhari administration’s economic diversification drive has borne fruit, with domestic food production rising. But the system relies heavily on government subsidies and low-cost loans, particularly from the central bank. We take a look at the Central Bank of Nigeria’s prominent, unorthodox role in the farming sector.


-Tech: Lagos has the hottest tech scene on the continent, with fintech playing a particularly prominent role. But the coronavirus pandemic is expected to dry up VC funding - how are Nigerian founders bracing for a post-Covid world?


-Op-ed from a Nigerian commentator.



Information


Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Mark Carwardine: +44 (0)20 7873 4880, mark.carwardine@ft.com

Larry Kenney: +44 (0)20 7873 4835, larry.kenney@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


Saturday 03 Oct 2020
Collecting: Frieze Week
Monday 05 Oct 2020
FTfm Special: Responsible Investing
Monday 05 Oct 2020
Mumbai as a Financial Centre

Mumbai as a Financial Centre

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over May 1st, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Mumbai’s Future

Since the liberalisation of India’s economy in 1991, Mumbai has grown into one of the world’s predominant financial centres as global investors seek to take advantage of India’s booming economy. Yet economic growth has slowed, as has private investment, and the pulsating metropolis is creaking with population growth and climatic challenges. Foreign investors still often remain ambivalent about setting up here. Can the city continue to flourish?


Banking

Mumbai is home to India’s banking and shadow banking sector, which has over the past 18 months struggled under the weight of unpaid debts. New lending has slowed, and a number of financial institutions are at risk of collapse. The strain is reverberating through the real economy. Is the worst over, or do deeper issues remain unaddressed?


Regulation

Mumbai’s reputation as an investment hub has been damaged by financial scandals. Such episodes point to governance failings and inadequate oversight. The government has sought to give the Reserve Bank of India more power to oversee the financial system. What is being done?


New Financial Centres

Financial markets have prospered in Mumbai, with exchanges like the BSE and NSE thriving. But other financial centres are emerging in India, such as the purpose built GIFT City some 300 miles north of the city. How attractive are these new hubs to investors and businesses?


Fintech

The rise of payment start-ups and others challenging the dominance of Mumbai-based banks.


Tax Conflicts

The tax authorities an eternal source of trepidation to businesses in India. Some prominent global companies have been embroiled in painful disputes and new tax provisions continue to cause headaches for investors. Yet evasion remains rampant. The government has introduced measures to reduce tax conflicts while boosting revenue collections -- are they working?





Inequality

The capital flowing into the city over the past three decades has led to abundant spending by some, while almost half the population lives in slums. The city is considered one of the world’s most unequal. What challenges does this pose to Mumbai’s future as a global business hub?


Infrastructure

The city’s business reputation is hurt by poor infrastructure. This is being addressed, for example, by plans for a metro system and a high-speed railway, but such projects are beset by delays. What difference will they make?


Life in Mumbai (column)

A local financier or banker - from the city but who has lived in hubs like London or Hong Kong - reflects on its pluses and minuses. Work/ life balance, raising a family, culture and so on.


Interview:  Q and A with a leading Mumbai-based financier.


Interview:  Our correspondent speaks with a senior policy maker


Downtime Mumbai:  A leisure guide to the city for a visiting business person.



Information


Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


Robert Grange +44 (0)20 7873 4418, robert.grange@ft.com

Srinivas Iyer +91 98 2013 2670, srinivas.iyer@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 




Tuesday 06 Oct 2020
Watches & Jewellery Asia Special
Tuesday 06 Oct 2020
Brazil

Brazil

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on May 14th, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Introduction: Brazil under Bolsonaro

The Brazilian president in the broader Latam and global context.


Reforms - What economic reforms are on the table and why do they matter.


Brazil in the World

Once a leading advocate of multilateralism, Brazilian foreign policy has changed tack and is increasingly focused on bilateral ties with the US, China and India.


Security:  The murder rate is finally decreasing, but at what cost? Do people feel safer?


Profile

Rio is a hotbed of civic activism and social entrepreneurship and the next young and socially-engaged president of Brazil may come from here. The suave and sharp Luciano Huck, a television star in his mid-40s, is sharpening his knives to leap at the challenge of defeating far-right populism in the next presidential election.

 

Infrastructure

Interview with star infrastructure minister on the ambitious plan for PPP, concessions, privatisations.

 

Manaus Free Trade Zone

The end may be nigh for Brazil's once vaunted free trade zone in Manaus, Amazonia. The Harley Davidsons are still rolling off the production lines in the forest but critics say the site has become a den of vested interests, which alone is harming the broader Brazilian economy to the tune of half a percentage point.


Mercosur

The future of Mercosur now that its two biggest members are on the far ends of the ideological spectrum.


Brazil’s Credit Revolution

Brazil is on the threshold of a new and unfamiliar world: one of low inflation and low interest rates, with implications reaching into every corner of the economy.


Ethanol

Scene from Ribeirão Preto on the booming ethanol industry that is now being exported to India.



Roundtable

The future of Brazil’s oil and gas industry. Sidebar on Brazil key gas contract with Bolivia

 

Op -ed - The state of the Brazilian economy

Information


Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


John Moncure +1 917 551 5036, john.moncure@ft.com

 

Brazil - Alessandre Siano +55 11 992 912 814, alessandre.siano@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

Wednesday 07 Oct 2020
Rec: Women in Business
Thursday 08 Oct 2020
Future Logistics
Friday 09 Oct 2020
FT Wealth 2020 - Family Office
Friday 09 Oct 2020
Oil & Gas
Saturday 10 Oct 2020
Collecting: Paris Art Scene
Wednesday 14 Oct 2020
Investing in Greece

Investing in Greece

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over October 14th, 2020

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Politics

After three international bailouts and a turbulent period of left-wing rule, Greece aims for a sustained recovery under the centre-right prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis, a US-trained former consultant. His pro-business government is committed to completing further reforms under EU supervision following a solid election win last July over the radical Syriza party. But how will Greece catch up after a “lost decade” that saw output fall by one-quarter and massive emigration by skilled younger workers?


Economy

Business confidence has returned to pre-bailout levels since the Mitsotakis government took office. The economy is set to expand by around 2.5 per cent this year, while the jobless rate is slowly declining. But foreign investment is lagging and Greek banks are struggling to reduce their non-performing loans. Can Greece overcome the challenges left by the crisis and succeed in accelerating growth?

Interview: With a senior politician or business figure   


Privatisation

State-controlled energy companies, from gas-trading to electricity distribution, are being offered for sale, alongside a minority stake in the Athens international airport. Disposals of regional ports and yacht marinas are also underway. This article examines how the centre-right government is rebooting Greece’s privatisation programme with the aim of attracting big-name international investors.


Renewable Energy 

A decision by the Mitsotakis government to shut down Greece’s coal-fired power plants by 2024 has opened the way for rapid growth of renewables. Current solar and wind capacity would have to be tripled to replace electricity output from coal-fired plants. But bureaucratic obstacles and increasing popular opposition to installing giant wind turbines on Aegean islands raise doubts about whether Greece will be able to meet its revised targets for renewable energy production.   


Tourism

Tourism became more important to the economy during Greece’s recession: it now accounts for one-quarter of national output compared with one-fifth before the crisis. But the overwhelming majority of visitors still arrive between May and September. Can the season be extended by promoting niche tourism, such as hiking and wellness retreats, in the spring and autumn months?


Olive oil

It is considered Greece’s signature product, yet much of the country’s high-quality olive oil is sold cheaply and shipped in bulk to Italy or Spain for mixing with local brands. But in some Greek regions, interest in producing bottled olive oil revived during the crisis. This article examines how a new generation of farm-to-delicatessen Greek growers are selling their own brands of premium olive oil in European and US markets  


Education

Under a new policy to modernise the country’s universities, Greece is offering courses in classics and ancient history designed to attract foreign students. Chinese students are already enrolling at Athens university for a four-year undergraduate course taught in English, while US students are expected to sign up for graduate programmes. This piece will consider Greece’s prospects for becoming a global education hub for classical studies.   


Company Profiles

These will be short profiles of companies that flourished during Greece’s recession after deciding to focus on exports.


National Anniversary

Modern Greece marks its 200th birthday in 2021. This article looks ahead to celebrations and a national debate over how an impoverished Ottoman province won independence with the help of European powers, doubled its territory in successive conflicts with Turkey and eventually secured its place in western Europe as a member of NATO and the EU.


Information

■ Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library

Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the 

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page. 


For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports. 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com 

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries. 

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Thursday 15 Oct 2020
African Banking & Finance
Friday 16 Oct 2020
Arab World: Banking & Finance
Monday 19 Oct 2020
Business Education 2020 (6) - EMBA
Monday 19 Oct 2020
FTfm Special:Smart Beta
Thursday 22 Oct 2020
FT 401: Top Retirement Advisers
Friday 23 Oct 2020
FT Health: Cell Therapies - Part 2
Monday 26 Oct 2020
Risk Management: Exchanges, Trading & Clearing
Wednesday 28 Oct 2020
Cyber Security: Ai & Data
Wednesday 28 Oct 2020
Investing in Mauritius
Saturday 31 Oct 2020
Collecting: Autumn
Monday 02 Nov 2020
FTfm Special: Fixed Income
Wednesday 04 Nov 2020
Risk Management: Property

Risk Management: Property

 

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over November 04, 2020

 

We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional): 

 

Climate Change

Wildfires in Australia and California have exposed the toll climate change is taking on buildings in parts of the world exposed to extreme weather. Real estate markets are suffering and insurers are backing out of fire-prone areas. We look at the growing risks to global real estate markets from extreme weather events linked to climate change, and what the property industry itself should be doing to mitigate damage and reduce its own climate impact. 

 

Retail Property

Retail real estate is now in a steep slump in both the UK and US: values fell 12 per cent in the UK in 2019 (CBRE) and US malls dropped 11 per cent (Green Street Advisors). Is the decline set to infect European and Asian retail property too -- and how far does the downturn have left to run? Investors have begun buying UK shopping centres again, albeit at heavily discounted prices -- is this a sign of hope or are they catching a falling knife?

 

Real Estate Debt Funds (US-focused)

As banks retreated from risky real estate lending after the financial crisis, real estate debt funds mushroomed to fill the gap. But while some are run by experienced veterans, industry players say others are taking on excessive risk. What happens when loans turn sour as the property cycle turns? 

 

Brexit

With the government aiming to finalise the UK's trade arrangements with the EU by the end of this year, what are the potential implications for property markets if the UK experiences a "cliff edge" at year-end -- and how far is the prospect holding back real estate markets in the UK this year? 

 

Silicon Valley/ High Urban House Prices

Some big tech companies are to fork out vast sums to help address the housing affordability crisis in California they helped create by drawing in highly paid tech workers. Why have the tech giants finally decided this is a concern for them, and what are the risks if steep housing inequality continues?

 

Interview on Global Fire Safety

The Grenfell Tower disaster three years ago exposed fire safety failures in the UK which building experts say are also a concern in other countries. This prompted the launch of the International Fire Safety Standards (IFSS) Coalition in 2018. Why is the group needed and what are its top priorities? 

 

Money Laundering

The UK and US are among the advanced economies that have introduced new rules to prevent the flow of dirty cash into real estate, but campaigners say a far tougher approach is needed. With the UK government starting to seize properties and fine estate agents and other professionals who fail to take full anti-money-laundering measures, what more should the industry be doing to ensure it does not fall foul of illicit money flows?

India

Indian cities are studded with unfinished developments after a downturn and funding squeeze put paid to ambitious development projects. What went wrong -- and can a new scheme from the State Bank of India to finance builders and homebuyers unclog the market?

 

Shared Offices

After WeWork's near-collapse last summer, and the failures or acquisitions of several smaller providers, landlords are looking again at shared office operators and their business models. How risky is the model for property owners, and has its period of growth ended?

 

Hong Kong

The fortunes of some of Hong Kong’s richest men are built on property, while the territory’s residential prices are among the world’s most expensive. But political tensions and protests in the territory have cut into market values. Is this a buying opportunity -- or is investment in Hong Kong property fraught with risk?

 

Landmarks

As buildings from the mid to late 20th century become overdue for refurbishment, some are in danger of demolition. What are the neglected (UK or overseas) 20th century landmarks that deserve preservation?

 

Information

 

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

 

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

 

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

 

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

 

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

 

Ben Tobin +44 (0) 20 7775 6615, ben.tobin@ft.com

 

or your usual Financial Times representative.

 

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.

 

Friday 06 Nov 2020
Watches & Jewellery (November)
Monday 09 Nov 2020
Managing Climate Change
Monday 09 Nov 2020
The UKs Entrepreneurs
Tuesday 10 Nov 2020
Investing in Kuwait
Wednesday 11 Nov 2020
Energy Efficiency
Thursday 12 Nov 2020
The COP 26: Guide & Workshop
Wednesday 18 Nov 2020
REC: Diversity Leaders
Wednesday 18 Nov 2020
Investing in Senegal
Thursday 19 Nov 2020
Sustainable Food and Agriculture 4 (Single Sponsor)
Friday 20 Nov 2020
Innovative Lawyers: Intelligent Business
Friday 20 Nov 2020
Technology: Latin America

Technology: Latin America

The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report on May 01st, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):


Introduction

Latam tech is coming of age. After a slow start, the arrival last year of major investors such as Japan's Softbank and Chinese players such as Tencent have brought a flood of new money. Investment in 2019 totalled around $5bn and the number of venture capital firms active in the region is growing fast. 

 

Interview with leading tech fund investor in the region


Tech for Good

While Brazil is not likely to create a new social network or score a moonshot, there is a great deal of space for technology to improve people's lives in a country with huge social needs, whether in terms of tech-enabled education programmes to improve literacy, healthcare programmes to lower the cost of care or group buying to reduce the price of basic goods. 


Incumbents Play Catch-up

Brazil's old guard companies embrace tech. Some of the country's biggest companies - banks Itaú and Bradesco and beverage giant Ambev - are offering "fast tracks" to start-ups to supply innovations. The companies know they can't attract the talent that start-ups do, so their thinking is this "fast track" is a way to obtain cutting edge tech. 


Mexico Tech

Why does Mexico, Latin America's second biggest economy, not have a single unicorn? Part of the answer relates to President Andrés Manuel López Obrador and his tech problem. López Obrador's vision for the economy is one fired by fossil fuels and powered by state-led development. Tech is not a word often heard in the government's vocabulary. 


Colombia Tech

Despite President Duque's enthusiastic rhetoric promoting what he likes to call the "Orange Economy", tech companies in Colombia have had mixed fortunes. Uber's experience is a sobering lesson: following a battle over regulation, Uber exited the country earlier this month amid acrimony. 


Medellin

Better known as the hometown of one of the world's most notorious drug traffickers, Colombia's second city is re-inventing itself as a tech hub. Chosen as the only city in Latin America to host one of the Centres for the 4th Industrial Revolution, Medellin is now working on cutting-edge blockchain and AI projects. 


Montevideo

Tiny Uruguay has become an unlikely software star. Supportive government policies, a well-educated population, low costs and good internet access mean the country of 3.5m now exports software to more than 52 nations. 

 

Buenos Aires

Argentina has been the premier origin of Latin America's unicorns, with retailing giants such as Mercado Libre (Latam's Amazon). But will the new Peronist government promote the knowledge economy or will their protectionist and statist bent undermine all that? 


Chile

A look at Start-up Chile, a public start-up accelerator created by the Chilean Government for high-potential entrepreneurs. Today, Start-Up Chile is the leading accelerator in Latin America and among the top 10 globally. 


Company Profiles


Brazil Fintech

Known for its high costs and bureaucracy Brazil’s economy remains dominated by five big, traditional banks. The flipside is that this is making it an increasingly attractive target for agile technology start-ups.


Information


Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports


A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the

Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.

For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.


This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.


All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com

This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.


Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

 

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:


John Moncure +1 917 551 5036, john.moncure@ft.com

 

Brazil - Alessandre Siano +55 11 992 912 814, alessandre.siano@ft.com


Argentina, Chile, Uruguay & Paraguay

Gonzalo Rio +54 9 11 5497 6679, gonzalo.rio@ft.com


or your usual Financial Times representative.


Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no 

Wednesday 25 Nov 2020
Cyber Security: Internet of Things
Saturday 28 Nov 2020
Collecting: Art in The Americas
Saturday 28 Nov 2020
The Business of Formula One
Monday 30 Nov 2020
FTfm Special: Emerging Markets
Tuesday 01 Dec 2020
Investing in Uganda
Investing in Uganda
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over June 25th, 2020


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Introduction
Uganda has been growing at a moderately fast pace for several years, overcoming instability on its northern border with South Sudan and establishing itself as a stable ally of the US in the region. It has been a generous recipient of refugees from that conflict. Elections are due in 2021 when Yoweri Museveni’s long mandate will be tested again. The country’s economic prospects could be significantly altered by the oil industry, though there have been delays in bringing production on-stream. 

Oil
The discovery of large oil reserves - estimated at six billion barrels - in western Uganda in 2006 spurred high expectations of economic transformation. But crude production has been repeatedly delayed over the years by spats over taxes and a lack of infrastructure. We assess the state of play and outlook for the industry.

Fintech
Uganda's fintech industry is becoming one of the most vibrant in east Africa, accelerating financial inclusion. In a country where only 11 per cent of the population is banked by traditional institutions, over 24m mobile money accounts were registered in recent years, covering more than half the population. We look at the startups powering the sector’s growth.

Coffee
Uganda boasts some of the best coffee in the world but has been slower to brand its beans than some other countries, including Ethiopia and neighbouring Rwanda. This piece will look at attempts to extract more value from coffee by increasing premiums and moving up the value chain. 

Trade
A big chunk of Ugandan exports go to the East African Community - arguably one of the most successful of Africa’s trade blocs. But tensions with member Rwanda -  a long-running rivalry that led to conflict in the past and closed their busiest border crossing for the past year - continues to take a toll on the Ugandan economy. Ugandans are putting hopes on the new African Continental Free Trade Area that will come into force in July and aims to bring together 55 countries. 

Airlines
Uganda Airlines, founded by Idi Amin, is airborne again after almost two decades out of the skies. It wants to take a slice of the East African aviation industry that is dominated by Ethiopian Airlines. But the state-run airline is flying into an increasingly crowded aviation market - Tanzania is also resurrecting its airline, while Rwanda is expanding its own - in a continent where carriers have the weakest finances and emptiest planes of any region in the world. 

Politics
This piece will look at what is likely to be a hard-fought election campaign as challengers, including Bobi Wine and opposition stalwart Kizza Besigye seek to end Yoweri Museveni’s more than 30 years in power. After court interventions into elections in both Kenya and Malawi, the 2021 elections will be closely watched both in the region and internationally. 

China
China has now completed a digital television project that will see more than 500 villages across Uganda access digital television. Access to Satellite TV for 10,000 African Villages is among the largest such programmes supported by Beijing. This piece will look at China’s growing influence in Uganda, both in the economic and soft-power spheres.  

Gold
Gold production reached a record high in 2016, but has since slipped back. This article will look at the ups and downs of the country’s second-largest export.

Tourism:  Gorillas back in the mist
Amid growing concern over the prospects for wildlife worldwide, the population of mountain gorillas in Uganda is growing a new census shows. More than three decades of “extreme conservation” - including day-to-day protection of gorillas - coupled with collaboration between governments, conservation organizations is having a positive impact.  

Fashion
For years, Uganda has been pushing through "Buy Uganda Build Uganda" - a policy aimed at fostering domestic manufacturing and consumption in certain sectors. Now, in a country where imported hand-me-down trousers and second-hand dresses from the US fuel the local garment industry, an increasing number of locals want "Made in Uganda" apparel. This is underpinning a rising craze for fashion designed and made in the cotton-producing country. 

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

Mark Carwardine: +44 (0)20 7873 4880, mark.carwardine@ft.com

Larry Kenney: +44 (0)20 7873 4835, larry.kenney@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


 
Thursday 03 Dec 2020
Chile 2020
Investing in Chile
The Financial Times proposes to publish this FT Report over in 13 November 2019


We plan to include the following features (please note that this list is provisional):

Politics
Since the end of Pinochet’s military dictatorship 30 years ago, Chile has been one of the most stable democracies in the region. But the return to power in 2018 of Sebastián Piñera, after he became Chile’s first rightwing president to be elected in half a century in his first 2010-14 term, has seen him struggle to implement his business-friendly reform programme. What can be expected of Piñera’s second term?
 
Economy
Chile has long been held up as the example to follow by other Latin American countries after the unprecedented economic growth of the past 40 years that saw it become one of the richest nations  in the region, having been one of the poorest – a phenomenon known as the “Chilean Miracle”. But in recent years Chile’s economic performance has been disappointing. Can Chile ever escape the middle-income trap and become Latin America’s first developed nation?
 
Interview with a senior politician or business figure
 
Trade & Investment
As one of the region’s most open, stable and prosperous economies, Chile is regarded as a safe investment destination and a reliable trading partner, with more free trade agreements than any other country in the world. How can Chile harness organisations such as APEC to boost its trading prowess and enhance its standing with investors? Or the Pacific Alliance closer to home, and the rival Mercosur group?
 
Copper
As the world’s leading copper producer, the red metal has been the linchpin of Chile’s economy for decades, accounting for almost half of its exports. While this has helped to drive growth, it also leaves Chile exposed to price fluctuations and demand from China, while ageing mines and falling ore grades are requiring heavy investment. What is the future of Chile’s copper sector?
 
Lithium
Chile dominated the world lithium markets for decades, with some of the largest and highest-quality proven reserves. But despite soaring demand for use in mobile phones and electric cars, Chile’s production has flattened thanks to strict regulations, and the country is in danger of falling behind competitors like Australia. Can Chile’s lithium sector overcome its challenges, and even build batteries locally?
 
Tourism
A more than 2,600-mile-long strip of land wedged between the spine of the Andes and the Pacific Ocean, Chile is a country that is blessed with some of the most striking and diverse landscapes in the continent – from the Atacama desert in the north, to the lakes, forests and glaciers of its Patagonian south. This article examines how Chile is making the most of its tourism resources.
 
Company Profile
This piece looks at a company that is playing a leading role in the diversification of Chile’s economy away from its dependence on copper mining, so reducing the effects of “Dutch disease” associated with an over-reliance on natural resources.
 
Disaster Management
Earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes, floods, fires – Chile suffers them all. But as a member of the Pacific “Ring of Fire” countries, Chile has won a reputation as the example to follow when it comes to disaster management, thanks to rigorous building codes, evacuation simulations and preparation, which allowed it to escape a 2015 earthquake that measured 8.4 on the Richter scale virtually unscathed.
 
Renewable Energy
Until recently, Chile was a major energy importer. But in the last few years, a revolution in its renewable energy sector has greatly reduced its reliance on imports. What challenges does Chile face to becoming energy self-sufficient and how feasible is its goal to produce all energy from renewable sources by 2040?

Information

Recently published FT Special Reports can be viewed at www.ft.com/specialreports

A full list of published reports can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/reports/library Forthcoming FT Special Reports and their synopsis can be downloaded via the
Future Reports link on the www.ft.com/specialreports page.
For website assistance please call + (0) 20 7775 6297.

This editorial synopsis must not be amended in any way by anyone other than the Editor of Special Reports.

All submissions or suggestions for editorial features should be sent to reports@ft.com
This is to ensure all suggestions can be assessed and to enable the editorial team to cope with the huge volume of approaches that would otherwise stop them from doing their work. Due to the volume of approaches the editorial team are unable to confirm receipt or respond to all enquiries.

Advertisement and Sponsorship Information

For details of the advertising and sponsorship opportunities please contact:

John Moncure: +1 917 551 5036, john.moncure@ft.com

Gonzalo Rio +54 9 11 5497 6679, gonzalo.rio@ft.com

or your usual Financial Times representative.

Please note the advertising representatives cannot assist with editorial approaches or other editorial matters. Please be advised Financial Times advertisers and sponsors have no influence on editorial content.


 
Friday 04 Dec 2020
FT Wealth 2020 - Dec
Monday 07 Dec 2020
Business Education 2020 (7) - EU Business School
Friday 11 Dec 2020
Innovative Lawyers: North America
Monday 18 Jan 2021
Health at Work 2021 - Microsite (Single Sponsor)
Wednesday 20 Jan 2021
The World 2021
Thursday 16 Sep 2021
Health at Work 2021 - Magazine (Single Sponsor)
Friday 24 Sep 2021
The Future of AI & Digital Healthcare (Single Sponsor)
Monday 21 Nov 2022
Health at Work 2022 - Magazine (Single Sponsor)

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